The weekly newsletter on the art of photography from
 
Wednesday, February 28, 2007
IN THIS ISSUE
Featured Gallery
Welcome Note
This Week's Tip
Updates From BetterPhoto
Q&A 1: How to Photograph...
Q&A 2: Getting Catchligh...
Q&A 3: Shooting a School...
Q&A 4: Copyright Questio...
Q&A 5: Studio Business L...


TESTIMONIAL OF THE WEEK
"Thanks again for your wonderful teaching, insightful critiques and inspiring comments - without you guys, I would never have tried to take a shot of a moving taxi. I owe it all to you!" -student in Susan and Neil Silverman's Street Photography online photography class.







NEW CLASS: DIGITAL SLR EXPOSURE TECHNIQUES
Start getting the best exposures out of your digital camera, ones that will not require extensive "fixes" in software later. This new class by George Schaub - longtime BP instructor and Shutterbug magazine's editorial director - begins March 7th. Learn more....


ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
Get word of your product or service out to a rapidly growing list of over 63679 serious photographers.
Learn More...

THIS WEEK'S TIP
Pro Advice: Of Cases and Lists ... by John Siskin
I have different cases for my camera depending on how I’m going to be shooting. I have a hard Pelican case for the studio and a soft case for jobs with multiple locations. I have a list of the things I need in each case. I have forgotten things too often, and such a list solves that problem.
Editor's Note: Commercial shooter John Siskin teaches many excellent online BetterPhoto classes, including Portrait Lighting on Location and in the Studio and Understanding Professional Lighting.


   
Featured Gallery

Welcome to the 305th issue of SnapShot!
Hello,

Great news! We have a two-day sale - 2 years for the price of 1 on any BetterPholio product! Simply order before 11pm PT, March 1st, and write "2 for 1" in the "Additional Comments" field of the order form. We'll add a free year to your Premium or Deluxe BetterPholio account! Offer good for renewals too. Learn more... Also, check out the sleek new design of our course categories page. Also note that we have two awesome new categories: People Photography Classes and Classes on Nature and Travel... In this issue of SnapShot, don't miss the excellent new articles by instructors Richard Lynch and Kerry Drager. Also, be sure to read This Week's Photo Tip from John Siskin... And, if you aren't regularly visiting our Instructor Insights BetterBlog, you've been missing many enlightening tips, techniques and thoughts ... That's it for now. Enjoy your week of photography!

Jim Miotke
Where Is Jim?

Updates From BetterPhoto

Would you like to learn more about exposure, composition, digital photography, photographic field techniques, Photoshop, specialty subjects, or the business of photography? Then join us for an inspiring online PhotoCourse™ at BetterPhoto.com. Learn more... At BetterPhoto, many of our instructors share their expertise through how-to articles. Read these new ones: - Beyond Your Mouse: The Best Devices for Image Editing by Richard Lynch and Kerry Drager - Getting Creative with Close-ups: Depth of Field by Kerry Drager Excellent news! We now have all of the exciting details for the 3rd Annual BetterPhoto Photography Conference (September 29th and 30th, 2007, in Chicago). The event features a grand location, a plethora of instructors, a ton of information and inspiration, and a lot of great fun!

Photo Q&A

1: How to Photograph a Painting
What's the best advice for taking a photo of a painting?
- Mary E. Heinz
ANSWER 1:
Hi Mary,
I posted this article about copying artwork ... I hope it helps! How to Copy Artwork
Thanks, John Siskin
- John H. Siskin

See John Siskin's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=158091

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with John Siskin:
4-Week Short Course: Framing and Mounting Your Photographs
4-Week Short Course: Introduction to Product Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Lighting on Location and in the Studio
Understanding Professional Lighting
ANSWER 2:
Hi Mary,
The material must be uniformly illuminated in glare free light. If you don’t have a copy set-up, take the work outside. Place in full shade or better, wait for a highly overcast day. Always remove cover glass.

Place camera on a tripod and make sure the camera is square on, dead center, perpendicular to the work.
If you can’t fully eliminate glare and reflections by lighting technique, mount a polarizing filter on your camera. The filter mount must allow the filter to be rotated. As you observe through viewfinder or LCD screen, turn the filter (rotate) for maximum reflection cancellation.

If this is to become routine, invest in a copy set-up. Polarizing filters on the copy stand lights as well as camera can be helpful. Can’t work outside, no copy set-up? Use ordinary pin-up lamps from the hardware store, Mount two lamps at 45° placed off to side. Increased lamp to subject distance insurers uniformity. Sometimes, with a causal set-up, bouncing the light off the ceiling is best.
Alan Marcus

- Alan N. Marcus
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



2: Getting Catchlights in Subject's Eyes
Is there a sure-fire way to capture catchlights in a subject's eyes?
- Debbie 
ANSWER 1:
Hi Debbie,
A small strobe near the lens will give you a catch light. Near does not mean an on-camera strobe, though that works. Generally a strobe within about 3 feet of the lens works well. If you use an on-camera strobe, you’ll have a catch light just about dead center in the pupil. If you make this the main source of light in your shot, you’ll have other problems, but you’ll have a catch light.
Thanks, John Siskin
- John H. Siskin

See John Siskin's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=158091

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with John Siskin:
4-Week Short Course: Framing and Mounting Your Photographs
4-Week Short Course: Introduction to Product Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Lighting on Location and in the Studio
Understanding Professional Lighting
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



3: Shooting a School Play in Dark Auditorum
What settings should I set my camera on to take pictures at my daughter's talent show? It is going to be dark in the auditorium and the stage will be well-lit. Thanks.
- Joyce B. Byerly
ANSWER 1:
I do a lot of theatre photography. The first rule of thumb is NO FLASH! 1). You will only end up lighting up the audience in front of you. 2). It's very bad etiquette.
Next, even with the bright stage lights, you'll want to bump your ISO up to 800, 1600 depending on the light.
You will need to watch your shutter speed and aperture, so it is probably easiest to set it on Aperture or Shutter Speed priority, depending on which is your biggest concern. I tend to work wide open so I can have somewhat faster shutter speeds. Depending on your camera and the lenses you have to choose from, you'll want a fast lens (I use the 50 mm 1.4).
HTH! :)
Erin
- Erin Tyler
ANSWER 2:
You should follow the same guidelines as you would band photography:
1) Higher ISO. 2) Fast lens (f/1.4 to f/2.8). 3) No flash.
This will be your best bet for low lighting. This should get you those extra shutter speeds and allow you to freeze the action.
- Michael A. Bielat
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:



4: Copyright Question
I am providing a print to someone as consideration for a Property Release. The original image was shot in 2004. What should the wording and year be on the © notice I place on the back of the print? Should I also put my company name along with my name? Thanks.
- Mike Rubin
ANSWER 1:
Mike, the copyright date (year) is the date you shot the image - 2004. If you intend to place info on the back, what you put is up to you.

John

- John R. Rhodes
ANSWER 2:
... or, Michael, it could be the year it was first published. If you're doing this under the company name - say, in your capacity as owner - then be sure to put the name of your company along with your name on the image. For example:
    Copyright 2004, Mike R.
    XYZ Photographic Conglomerate, No job too big or too small, open 7 days a week, by appointment only, etc. etc.
    2130 ABC Boulevard, Anywhere U.S.A.
If the company isn't involved, then just your name (or the name of the actual copyright holder) will suffice.
Okie dokie?
Mark
- Mark Feldstein
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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5: Studio Business License Needed?
I have recently rented studio space in a privately owned building in which there are about 75 other artists and photographers also renting studio space. My plan, after some remodeling and painting, is to exhibit and hopefully sell some of my photographs. Do I need a business license to sell photos from my studio? Is it dependent on state/locality (Virginia) and/or dollar value of total sales? Thanks in advance for any input provided.
- Nevia Cashwell
ANSWER 1:
The answer is probably "yes you do". You're actually a set-up to be visited by the local county tax collector, assessor, fire inspector, ad infinitum, by virtue of your location with all those other artists and photographers.
To get the straight scoop, contact the local county clerk's office or talk to the business license desk person at the city business license office. Tell them what you're proposing, and ask them whether you need a business license, among other permits oh yeah, and premise liability and business insurance.
Take it light.
Mark
- Mark Feldstein
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

Answer this question:

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