The weekly newsletter on the art of photography from
 
Tuesday, November 07, 2006
IN THIS ISSUE
Featured Gallery
Welcome Note
This Week's Tip
Updates From BetterPhoto
Q&A 1: Winter Wedding...
Q&A 2: Release for Shoot...
Q&A 3: Too Much Noise in...
Q&A 4: Canon External Fl...
Q&A 5: How to Price Holi...
Q&A 6: Picture Pricing...
Q&A 7: Shooting a Weddin...


TESTIMONIAL OF THE WEEK
"Vik was absolutely amazing as a teacher! This class was excellent, as were the critiques. I can't recommend it enough!" - student in Photographing Children with Vik Orenstein, who also teaches Studio Portrait Lighting.

LENSBABIES: SELECTIVE FOCUS SLR LENSES
BP RADIO: ASK A QUESTION & TUNE IN
NEW CLASS: SELF-DISCOVERY IN PHOTOGRAPHY
This new 8-week online class is a journey of self-discovery in finding out what you love to photograph and how best to photograph it. In Self-Discovery, master photographer and author Jim Zuckerman will gently push you to explore different areas of photography and learn where your passion in photography lies. You may discover new areas of creativity that will prove to be very fulfilling! Photo below by Jim Zuckerman Learn more about Self-Discovery class...
ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
Get word of your product or service out to a rapidly growing list of over 60898 serious photographers.
Learn More...

THIS WEEK'S TIP
The Monopod: Handy When You Need It! ... by Brenda Tharp
"Monopods are great for adding some stability when you need it, but either can't carry a tripod or are not allowed to use a tripod as it takes up too much space where you are," says instructor Brenda Tharp in a recent BetterBlog. "The most effective way to use it is to wrap one leg around the monopod, and hug the pod close to your body. This uses your body as the other 'legs' and creates a quasi-tripod, at least in effect. I can usually gain 2-3 shutter speeds with this method. Having a small ball head on the monopod is useful to allow you some flexibility in positioning the camera, too. And panning using a monopod can be very effective, as it helps to keep the up/down motion to a minimum as you are moving horizontally with the pan."
Editor's Note: Brenda Tharp teaches four excellent courses here at BetterPhoto: Mastering Macro; Macro II; Creating Visual Impact; Travel Photography.


   
Featured Gallery
Death Valley Dunes
© - Kay Beausoleil

Welcome to the 289th issue of SnapShot!
Hello,

More good news at BetterPhoto.comŽ! We are thrilled that popular instructor Jim Zuckerman has come up with yet another awesome online photography class: Self-Discovery in Photography... Along with Brenda Tharp, Jim Z is also a frequent contributor to our outstanding BetterBlog: Instructor Insights... By the way, all of the books in the BetterPhoto Store have been discounted -including my new BetterPhoto Guide to Digital Nature Photography...

Jim Miotke
Where Is Jim?

Updates From BetterPhoto

Would you like to learn more about exposure, composition, digital photography, photographic field techniques, Photoshop, specialty subjects, or the business of photography? Join us for an exciting online class at BetterPhoto.com... Having trouble deciding? Our Course Calculator will help you find your best next class. Learn more... In his new book, BP Founder Jim Miotke offers helpful lessons that cover every aspect of digital nature photography. We are selling this awesome book - autographed by Jim! - at $5 off the cover price. Learn more... Our redesigned BetterPhoto Deluxe Web Sites offer beautiful and functional design and easy Web hosting – at a great price. And they just got cheaper... 15% off all renewals. Learn more...

Photo Q&A

1: Winter Wedding
I have a wedding coming up in December, and the bride and groom want several portraits (of themselves, and the whole party) taken outdoors - no matter how cold. I am worried about harsh light and red noses. Rudolph bride does not sound festive. Any thoughts or suggestions about this? Thanks.
- Jennifer Hopper
ANSWER 1:
Have them hold the wedding in Laguna Beach, CA, or maybe Hawaii.
M
- Mark Feldstein
ANSWER 2:
Marks right, I'm shooting this evening in Laguna Beach and the weather is great with the Santa Ana winds blowing. How about buying the ring flash from White Lightning or using a 20" beauty dish with the white lightning 1600 and vagabond? Can't makeup keep her nose white?
- Oliver Anderson
ANSWER 3:
Your question brought to mind a winter wedding I had 2 years ago. It was December, and the bride's gown had fur on the collar and the arms (custom made) and it was supposed to be cold ... it was so HOT that her makeup melted...
I have done weddings in the summer, and the brides planned and WANTED to do photos outdoors, but when they got to the day and they were soooooooo hot, they changed their minds. This happened in winter as well ... once the day arrives and they are soooooooo cold, they may change their minds.
I'd keep their noses red ... serves them right!!!
Good luck!
- Debbie Del Tejo
ANSWER 4:
Makeup melting, red noses...weddings are so great. Photoshop can solve any of the red-nose problems or perhaps a nip of Whiskey. Then think of the great photos you'd get. LOL
- Oliver Anderson
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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2: Release for Shooting Lighthouses
I have photographed numerous lighthouse around the Delaware and Chesapeake Bays. I believe they are government-owned but also are associated with non-profit lighthouse associations. I did a show this weekend where I had some photos of the lighthouses for sale. A lady made a comment that all of these lighthouses belong to us. She took one of my business cards off the table and walked off. She didn't seem happy about the fact I was selling the photos. I got the impression she felt I didn't have permission to sell photos of the lighthouses and that she was part of some lighthouse foundation. Is there a requirement to get permission to sell these photos?
- Earl Blansfield
ANSWER 1:
I think you'll find that most lighthouses are still publicly owned property. If they still operate, it's likely the Coast Guard (In the U.S.) that physically maintains the light itself and a private non-profit association maintains the rest of the property, like the structures that house the lights, grounds and associated buildings. That's a pretty common scenario in California, Oregon and Washington. Where I live, it's Point Sur, Pigeon Point, Point Pinos, and a few in the San Francisco Bay Area.

So, public property owned and maintained by state or federal agencies is fair game for photographers and doesn't require a release for any reason, including commercial sales and/or self-promotion. There are a few lighthouses that were sold to private parties who turned them into residences. Those I believe DO require a release, but the property should be marked as PRIVATE PROPERTY, NO TRESPASSING, etc.
What you could do, and what I've done in the past, is directly contact the association or foundation that operates the lighthouse. Tell them who you are, what you want to do, ask for special access and offer them an opportunity to sell prints or posters of your work in their gift shop for a percentage of the profits. That, in turn, ingratiates you to them, motivates them to help you out when you need to shoot, helps you develop a relationship with them and their own benefactors (and trust me, they DO have lots of benefactors), and may help you turn a profit with your work. Works for me.
The really fun thing I've done is to volunteer as a docent for two lighthouses and went through a training course by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, so depending on my schedule, that allows me to give lighthouse tours to talk about their history, plants, ghosts, etc., and includes privileges like overnights. Wanna see something really scary?!?!? Nothing like being on top of a 620-foot hill perched over the Calif. coast during gale-force winds and rain, and the only two sounds you can hear are the howling winds and the fog horn on your light.
"It was a dark and stormy night... BOO !!!!"
Take it "light" ;>)
Mark

- Mark Feldstein
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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3: Too Much Noise in Low Light Situations
Hi, I've just bought a Nikon D80 as an upgrade from my D50. The problem is when I'm shooting at dusk/night on long exposures. No matter what ISO I choose, I seem to be genarating far too much noise. I've turned on the noise reduction in the camera's menu but still there's loads of noise. Can somebody tell me what I'm doing wrong?? Thanks.
- Damien J. 
ANSWER 1:
I have a Nikon D70, and I also get a lot of noise when shooting long exposures at night. From what I understand, this is typical. Try using noise reduction software such as NeatImage, Noise Ninja or Noiseware. They're all relatively inexpensive and they work wonders.
- Deb James
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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4: Canon External Flash
I am considering buying an external flash for my Canon 30D Any opinions on the best one?
- Kathleen  Brennan
ANSWER 1:
Canon 580EX
- Tareq M. Alhamrani
ANSWER 2:
Hi Kathleen,
I have the Rebel XT and have both the 420EX and 580EX. I recommend the 580 ... it's more powerful, can be used as a master if you ever want to get more for to act as slaves, and has a built-in bounce card that is great!!
- Denyse M. LaMay
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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5: How to Price Holiday Greeting Cards
I am trying to set price points for my Holiday Greeting Cards. I don't design any of the cards, I simply drop a photo into a design provided by my lab. I was going to charge $2 from 1-49 cards and $1.50 for cards over 50. My lab charges .84 and .50 respectfully. Am I charging too much?
I am also taking photos at an open house for a day care on Saturday offering free sitting fees (also not getting paid for my time), so I'm trying to get my holiday pricing down. I am getting differing opinions on this ... some say I'm too high and others say it's okay. Comments? Thanks!
- Angie M. Nemanic
ANSWER 1:
It's not the highest I've seen. What do other photogs in your area charge? I personally charge $1 each, which is probably too low. But then my lab only costs $.45 each so it's more than double profit.
I think doing free sitting fees for an event like that is fine. It's really just a way to get business. It's not as much about the money you'll make that day but more about the customers you'll get. That's how I look at it anyway.
- Danielle E. Rutter
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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6: Picture Pricing
While taking a few pictures at a local zoo, one of the docents asked if I would email her some of my pictures with the possibility of buying some of them in an 8 X 10 form. I have never sold pictures before and don't know what sort of price to put on them. Thanks for any advice you may have to offer.
- David K. Newman
ANSWER 1:
To keep it simple in this case, you could just double the price it costs you to produce the prints, if they are just for her enjoyment. I'm sure others will have an answer for you here, members that are not full-time pros but are selling prints here and there, yet lack the overhead I have. I'd have to charge more than she'd want to spend, as a pro. Has she given you special access to anything in the zoo? Is there a chance that she could? If she's in position to grant you special access that might lead to even better photos, you might consider giving her two 8x10s. This has great perceived value to her, but may cost you only a dollar to two to produce on your printer ... and get you some photos none else can get.

Editor's Note: Learn more about Brenda Tharp and her BetterPhoto courses by clicking here.

- Brenda Tharp

See Brenda Tharp's Premium Gallery:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=44021

Take an Online Photo Course with Brenda Tharp:
4-Week Short Course: Mastering Macro Photography
4-Week Short Course: Macro II: Advanced Techniques
Creating Visual Impact
Travel Photography: Capturing a Sense of Place
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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7: Shooting a Wedding with a Cough!
Hi guys!
Help! I've got an awful cough, and I'm shooting a wedding on Saturday. Have you guys found anything that helps? Either a good cough remedy or something that will keep it quiet? Have you found any tricks for being quiet while sick during a wedding? What have you done? Thanks!
- Courtney  Lawyer
ANSWER 1:
Vicks Daytime
- Derek 
ANSWER 2:
Continuously keep a throat/cough lozenge in your mouth. Ricolas are great - sugar-free, and they work - but there's a million of them out there. It keeps things moist, which keeps things from tickling which keeps you from coughing! Sounds like an ad! Good luck.
- Brenda Tharp

See Brenda Tharp's Premium Gallery:
http://www.betterphoto.com/mg.asp?id=44021

Take an Online Photo Course with Brenda Tharp:
4-Week Short Course: Mastering Macro Photography
4-Week Short Course: Macro II: Advanced Techniques
Creating Visual Impact
Travel Photography: Capturing a Sense of Place
ANSWER 3:
Vicks Chloraseptic will kill the tickle for a little while, too, if you can spray it discretely when your throat tickles. If you smoke, try not smoking until your cough is better.
- Sharon D
ANSWER 4:
Thanks you guys! I plan to suck on a lot of candy. I tried that the other day and it did help. And, no, I don't smoke... LOL, I'm not even old enough to legally buy cigerattes. :-)
- Courtney  Lawyer
Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com

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