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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Wednesday, December 28, 2005
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* SPOTLIGHT: BetterPhoto Online School: Learn to Use Your Holiday Gift!
* BETTERPHOTO: Learn to Be a Complete Digital Photographer ... in Just One Year!
* BETTERPHOTO: Good News! Lower Price on New Photoshop Elements Course
* BETTERPHOTO: Photograph Wildlife and Horses for a 2006 Adventure!
* FEATURED GALLERY: Focus on William Neill's Dynamic Landscape Photography
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Original Nikon / First Scanned Image
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Lighting: Using White Balance for Effect ... by Charlie Borland
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: ISO: Still Vs. Moving Subjects
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Digital Camera Suggestion Wanted
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Print Quality of Digital Images
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Digital Lens on a Film Camera?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Soft Pictures: How to Get Them?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: How Are Photos of the Day Chosen?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Use or Mis-Use of Sharpening Adjustment
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Problem with Sharpness
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Volunteer Photography for Community Service


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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BetterPhoto Online School: Learn to Use Your Holiday Gift!
Did Santa bring you a new digital camera? Do you want to learn how to use it to make great digital photos? Then consider one of the following BetterPhoto.com™ courses: Mastering the Digital Camera and Photography; Bare Bones Digital Photography; Digital SLR Photography; Digital Workout #1: Beginning Digital Photography; Jump Start to Digital Photography; The Joy of Digital Photography; and An Introduction to Digital Photography: Using Your Digital Camera. For details:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photo-courses.asp?catsearch=DIG


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 244th issue of SnapShot!

Hi {FirstName}

At BetterPhoto this holiday season, we are having so much fun gearing up for another exciting session of online classes. Check out our schedule at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp

While we are looking forward to a wonderful new year, we can't help but look back at 2005, with the launch of so many fine new features at BetterPhoto. For example:

- BetterBlogs (Instructor Insights, Notes from Team BetterPhoto, and of course, Jim's Journal):
http://www.betterphoto.com/BetterBlogs.asp

- New Deluxe BetterPholio™ designs:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/deluxe-photographer-websites.asp

In this issue of SnapShot, don't miss instructor Charlie Borland's Photo Tip on lighting, and instructor William Neill's awesome gallery.

Have a fantastic and safe holiday week! And whatever your plans, don't forget to have your camera handy :-)

Happy New Year,
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Learn to Be a Complete Digital Photographer ... in Just One Year!
Join BetterPhoto™ founder Jim Miotke for a fantastic year-long adventure: The Complete Digital Photographer online course. Through assignments that you will be sent every two weeks, as well as immediate answers to the questions that arise, you will have what it takes to be an award-winning photographer! Read all about it at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JCM05.asp


*****
Good News! Lower Price on New Photoshop Elements Course
BetterPhoto's exciting new online course covers all you need to know about Photoshop Elements - an awesome, popular, and affordable image-editing program. Appropriately titled "Adobe Photoshop Elements" and now costing just $297 USD, the 8-week class is taught by instructor-author Robin Nichols. For details:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/ROB02.asp

New Course: Perfect Digital Exposure: Join master photographer and author Jim Zuckerman for an exciting online course: Perfect Digital Exposure. After completing this 8-week class, you’ll never say "I hope my pictures turned out", because you’ll know how to handle every exposure situation with the confidence of knowledge! Read all about it at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JZK13.asp


*****
Photograph Wildlife and Horses for a 2006 Adventure!
BetterPhoto's exciting lineup of workshops combines the best of two worlds - online and on-location. These 3- and 6-day workshops include:
- Snow Shoot: Siberian Tiger, Horses, and Ranchers (January 25, 28, February 6, 20)
- California Wildlife, Day at the Ranch, and Yosemite (March 30)
- Wildlife in Montana (May 19, 22, July 17, 20)
- Summer Horse Roundup (August 14, 23)
For details:
http://www.betterphoto.com/on-location-photography-workshops.asp

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FEATURED GALLERY
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Focus on William Neill's Dynamic Landscape Photography
William Neill is the longtime "On Landscape" columnist for Outdoor Photographer magazine ... but, best yet, he's part of our talented team of BetterPhoto instructors with his awesome Portfolio Development online course. And you won't want to miss the stunning images in William's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/gallery.asp?memberID=98736

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
In 1946, Nikon produced the "Model One", their first camera for retail sale. Which two camera brands did the Nikon engineers use as a basis for this new camera design?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Mark Shotter is:
Leica and Contax

Editor's Note: Great question, Scott ... and you are absolutely right, Mark! The engineers agreed that these two cameras could use some improvement, according to the Nikon Historical Society. Work on the camera began in early 1946, with actual production on this first Nikon beginning in early 1948. "Many names were considered for the new camera," reports the society's Web site, "and some will sound familiar. In possible chronological order they considered: Bentax, Pentax, Pannet, Nicca, Nikka, Nikka, Nikoret, Niko and Nikkorette. It is thought that 'Nikkorette' was the last name to be considered before the final configuration was decided upon. Just before the final design was completed, the name was changed to 'Nikon'."



To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - First Scanned Image - entered by BetterPhoto member Kerry Drager

At the U.S. National Bureau of Standards, a picture of the young son of researcher Russell A. Kirsch reportedly was the first photograph to be digitally scanned. Kirsch used an early mechanical drum scanning device. What year did this occur?



Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Lighting: Using White Balance for Effect ... by Charlie Borland

Once you have set up your strobe lights to photograph a subject, you can use your digital camera to creatively change the color of your scene by adjusting the white balance (WB) in small Kelvin temperature increments. For example, if you are photographing a person outside using a flash key technique, you can adjust your WB to a warmer setting such as 7000, 8000, or 9000K to make it feel more like a sunset light. Or if you are taking a picture of someone and want a cool moody lighting color effect, you can again adjust your WB to a bluish cool tone more in the 2000-4000K. If your camera comes with presets only, you can still get cool effects using those. For a cool blue look, use the Tungsten preset. Try Shade for an amber cast and fluorescent for a shade of purple.

View Charlie Borland's online photography courses:



Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
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BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: ISO: Still Vs. Moving Subjects
I just got a Kodak p850 for Christmas and I need help on what to set the ISO to when taking pictures of a subject in motion and a subject that is still.
- Kayla W

ANSWER 1:
Well, Kayla, the higher ISO number means that the chip will be more sensitive to light, which in turn means that you can use a faster shutter speed (to freeze action, say). The downside (there's always a downside) is that the faster ISO setting can mean that you will see "noise" in the image - sort of like grain in film.
So, for still stuff you will probably want to use the lowest number you can (if using a tripod, just use the lowest number since your hand movement won't cause any blurring when you're not holding the camera).
For in-motion subjects, though, there are other considerations. There's a lot more light shining on a BMX-er in an outdoor course than on a basketball player in a school gymnasium. For the former, you might be able to use a lower ISO number and still get a fast enough shutter speed to freeze action. For the latter, you'll probably have to use a higher ISO number to get any sort of image at all, and the highest might not be sensitive enough to allow for a fast shutter speed anyway.
I hope that helps.
- Bob

ANSWER 2:
Thanks for your help! After I read your advice, I went outside and shot photos of my neighbor's dog and some trees, and I worked with both the aperture and ISO number. The pictures turned out great! Thanks for your advice
- Kayla W

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21409

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21409

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*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Digital Camera Suggestion Wanted
Hi. Great Web site and forums! I am an old 35mm SLR guy. I mostly shoot landscapes, primarily waterfalls. I enjoy manually manipulating the shot by varying the exposure time primarily. I use a 28mm-70mm and 70mm-200mm zoom.
I want to try digital and would like recommendations under $500 for this first purchase ... unless a DSLR would be sooooo much better for a little bit more.
Another question is on "zoom". With the type of shots mentioned, should I go for a 12x optical zoom as opposed to a 3x optical with 4x digital? Or is there little difference?
Thank you!
- Richard A. Curle

ANSWER 1:
Richard, please understand that you are getting advice on a digital camera from a dedicated film guy so my knowledge is limited. If you have been shooting with a film SLR, I don't think you are going to be happy with a digital P&S camera. I would spend a little more and get a digital SLR, if digital is the way you want to go. If, however, you decide to go with a high-end digital P&S, stay away from the digital zoom. It doesn't really zoom like a zoom lens on an SLR does. It just crops the picture, and you won't like the results.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 2:
Richard,
I just recently made the switch to D-SLR and love it. I have to agree with Kerry. Depending on the SLR camera you have, you may want to look at buying a D-SLR body that will accept your current lenses. I had a Nikon N75 and went to the Nikon D70S. All my lenses work with my D70s. You may want to look on Ebay. You can probably find a used D-SLR for a good price. I think the D70S body sells for around 800-900 bucks new.
- Todd Bennett

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21407

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21407

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NEW QUESTION 3: Print Quality of Digital Images
When I had some digital images printed at the local photo store, some of the images (faces) had a distorted color appearance. It seems that certain areas of the picture had too much color. The photos were taken with a Canon A95 Powershot and were enhanced (image size, color, red eye, cropping) with MS Picture It. I copied the images to a CD for developing. The pictures do not look the same as they do on the computer. Any ideas about what I am doing wrong?
- Mary R. Hess

ANSWER 1:
Mary, what you see on your screen and what comes out of a printer can be rather different (different even from coming out of multiple printers). It sounds like the colors printed as oversaturated (red dress is "too red" etc.) - this could be a function of the way the photo store's printer read your digital files. Perhaps when you were doing adjustments in Picture It the software changed color values?
There is a whole craft and science to what is called calibration - where you first use special software and reader on your monitor to "teach" the computer what this certain shade of red really is, then you load so-called "profiles" for each printer/paper combination so the computer can translate that shade of red into the numbers the printer needs to reproduce the same shade. But that can take a bit of effort ... perhaps you can ask the folks at the lab to tone down the colors in a reprint or something?
- Bob

ANSWER 2:
Try making a print from the original and then see what comes from the unaltered file. Then make adjustments as you see fit, but without a calibrated monitor, it may be difficult to anticipate what your prints might look like. Many things can affect monitor color: ambient light around the monitor, brightness, image size, file viewer, and on and on. If you get your monitor calibrated, do so according to the specs of your most-often-used photo printer, so that you will see what they will print for you.
Chris Walrath
Walrath Photographic Imaging
http://home.comcast.net/~flash19901/wsb/html/view.cgi-home.html-.html
- Christopher A. Walrath

ANSWER 3:
I have found that a lot of the "quick print" photo labs have different qualities to their photos. Costco, for example, doesn't do anything to the pictures to fix them and will print as is. Kits, on the other hand, automatically uses their software to fix exposure so the pictures often look different from what you see on your computer. Plus, everyone calibrates their printers differently. Some are very careless about it. In my photography class, my teacher suggested taking one particular photo, of a pink rose or something with one basic color, to all the different labs in the area to see which place gives the truest to actual color photo. Hopefully, you can find one that you like. You can have the perfectly toned photo and everything could be right, except for the printer. :/ Unfortunately, sometimes it's the luck of the draw with the fast printing places.
- Autumn Hernandez

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21402

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21402

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NEW QUESTION 4: Digital Lens on a Film Camera?
I shoot 35mm film with a Nikon N65. I just received a Tokina 19-35mm lens for Christmas. However, it's a lens for a digital camera. Will it still work on my film camera? I heard that using digital lenses on film cameras causes some vignetting. Is this true?
- Ann Marie Carter

ANSWER 1:
Ann Marie, there are generally two differences between the digital lenses and their film brethren:

1) Because the chips in most digital SLR cameras are smaller than the 24x36mm frame size of the 35mm film format, lens makers can design their digital lenses with a smaller "cone of light". That is, some digital type lenses will not fully expose the entire frame of 35mm film - rather, you will see vignetting (sometimes rather extreme) towards the edges of the shot. Of course, if you enlarge just the central portion of the film, this doesn't make a difference.

2) Because CCD and CMOS chips are more reflective than film, lens makers have started to multicoat the rear elements of their digital lenses (to reduce unwanted reflections in the shutter box). There is no downside to this enhancement as far as film goes.

The instruction guide that came with the lens ought to say if it's suitable for use on film cameras or not. Mechanically, there should be no difference - autofocus and exposure, etc., should work just like a Nikkor lens. If you don't want to open the box so you can return it just in case, you should call and ask the store.
- Bob

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21394

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21394

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Soft Pictures: How to Get Them?
Hi,
I am just wondering: How do you get pictures that look soft? For some pictures, I know you don't want that but for others it gives a nice effect. Thanks!
- Jackie F. K

ANSWER 1:
Greetings, Jackie: There are a lot of ways. Starting with camera shake at slow shutter speeds, which will blur the entire image.
Or, you can get softar filters of one grade or another, and one type or another, that will leave some of the image sharp while the center is soft, or a sharp center with soft focus elsewhere.
Another trick is to get some Vaseline and smear a little bit on skylight UV or warming filter, and place that on your lens. Never smear Vaseline on the lens itself.
Also, remember that when you use softar filters or the Vaseline trick, you're going to need to compensate a bit, say 1/3 to 1/2 of an f-stop in additional exposure.
Lastly, there's the old depth-of-field trick, using a larger f-stop like f2.8 or as wide as your lens will allow, while focusing on the foreground, will soften or depending on how far back it is, will entirely blur out the background, or visa versa.
Take it light
Mark
- Mark Feldstein

ANSWER 2:
Photoshop absolutely has features that will soften. Gausian Blur is a very popular filter that you can use to soften a part of a picture or just the entire image. It can be used to soften a person's face and make wrinkles less noticeable. I like to blur the face a little but leave the eyes sharp. To do this, I copy the image into a new layer so that I can do the editing to the copy. I blur the copy a little and then I adjust the opacity to make it transparent so that the original image shows through. I then erase the eyes little by little from the copy to let the sharp, original eyes show through even more.
Some people use Diffuse Glow in Photoshop to get that dreamy, soft look. It doesn't work well for all images but can be quite awesome for others.
There are plenty of other ways to soften in Photoshop - I only mentioned the easiest, most common ways.
- Cherylann Collins

ANSWER 3:
Just breathe on the lens a little or a lot.
- Samuel Smith

See Samuel's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
As mentioned, there are many ways to achieve a soft-focus effect. (I've even heard of spraying a clear filter with hair spray.) A fog filter will create a dreamy, soft halo around lights and bright reflections while retaining sharpness throughout the rest of the image.
When using slide films, it's possible to sandwich two transparencies together ... one tack-sharp and the other out of focus for a neat effect.
Whatever method one chooses to use, it should appear to the viewer as intentional and not a by-product of poor focusing techniques or camera-shake.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 5:
Take your pictures using the LCD as the viewfinder. I've been asked to try to salvage too many images by friends who failed to use the viewfinder. The results cannot be sharpened.
- John Sandstedt

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21391

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21391

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NEW QUESTION 6: How Are Photos of the Day Chosen?
I would like to know about the Photo of the Day? Is there a contest for it? Can I participate? Many thanks.
- Jorge Sanz

ANSWER 1:
I believe they just snag them out of the general daily contest entries. POTD, however, doesn't mean that it'll be a finalist or winner for the month - just that it struck the judge's fancy at that moment.
- Bob Cournoyer

See Bob's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Hi Jorge,
Thanks for your interest in the Photo of the Day newsletter! I couldn't say it any better than Bob ... that's exactly how the POTD selection operates! (Hi Bob ... and thanks for jumping in with your answer!)
Kerry

Note: For anyone interested in checking out the POTD archives, or in subscribing to BetterPhoto's daily "dose" of visual inspiration, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/Photo-of-the-Day.asp


- Kerry Drager

See Kerry Drager's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Kerry Drager's Web Site - www.KerryDrager.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
Creative Light and Composition
4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups - January
4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups -February

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21389

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21389

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Use or Mis-Use of Sharpening Adjustment
I have had 5.1mp Sony for almost 2 yrs. I usually edit the pictures adding a little sharpness as offered in my editing room. Is there any disadvantage to doing this to my pictures?
- chefjoez zieger

ANSWER 1:
You can answer your own question best. Try printing your original, or final-edited, but not sharpened image. Then apply sharpening and make a comparison print. Which one do you like better?
Many, many articles state that all digital images need a bit of sharpening. When I scan my negs, slides or prints, I still sharpen.
The trick is to be judicious. Start with settings of Amount: 144, Radius: 1.4 and Threshold: 0. Remember, these are starting numbers. Make a print and check it out. Adjust as suits YOU!
- John Sandstedt

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21384

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21384

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: Problem with Sharpness
I need a little advice. I am shooting pictures of birds outside my living room window (window open during shooting) in a tree in my yard. I am using a Canon Rebel Digital with a 75-300 4-5.6 IS USM lens and aperture priority 5.6 - 6.3 to knock out the background - a big red stop sign, etc. My pictures are not very sharp. Do I lose sharpness by extending this lens to 300mm? Would 200 be sharper? How much effect would the 5.6 - 6.3 aperture have on sharpness? At 300mm, I can fill my LCD with the subject. Many thanks!
- Richard S. Clemens

ANSWER 1:
Richard, you don't mention using a tripod, and this can very well be the main problem. When you use the lens at 300mm focal length, it's similar to using a 9 power binocular - which not only magnifies the subject 9 times; it also magnifies any shake or movement at the camera side as well. While your intent is good to use the widest available aperture, it is still not a fast lens in the first place. This means that the shutter speed will be slower than it would with, say, an f2.8 lens. Slow shutter speed means a number of things - any quick enough movement on the subject's part will appear as a blur, and any movement introduced by you at the camera end will cause blur as well.
Understand, no matter how still you think you are, the blood flowing through your arteries and veins will cause a barely perceptable movement in your hands, which in turn is magnified by the longer lens. So ... use a tripod. That's rule number 1. Any stable support will be good - doesn't have to be a $500 carbon fiber behemoth. It should be sturdy, though - not a flimsy collapsible. From inside your home, a sturdy tabletop tripod or beanbag might make sense.
If possible, use a shutter release as well - to keep your finger pressure from disturbing the stability.
Beyond that, it's up to the shutter speed. The "rule of thumb" for 35mm cameras is 1 over the focal length should be the slowest shutter speed to handhold. With your camera's "crop factor", that multiplies a bit - so at 300mm the slowest shutter speed you should ever handhold is 1/500th - and that's a stretch. Even at 1/2000th you will see improvement using a support.
Of course, if there's not enough light to expose properly at those higher shutter speeds, you must go slower, or raise the ISO (and deal with noise). If the bird's wings are flapping, then, they may become blurred.
- Bob

ANSWER 2:
Everything Bob said. I want to add one more thing. I don't know if the D Rebel has mirror lockup (my 10D does). If it does, you might want to think about using it as well. When I am shooting with my 400mm lens, I always set the camera for mirror lockup, unless I am shooting at a high shutter speed (over 1/500th). I can see a huge difference in the sharpness of my photos. The mirror moving to let light onto the sensor makes the camera shake just slightly. Locking the mirror means that the first time you push the shutter, it locks the mirror, the second time, it opens the shutter. BTW, you do not want to leave the mirror locked for very long, as it is letting light into the camera the entire time, and bright light for too long can damage the sensor.
Use a shutter release cable. If I am thinking of the right lens, the lens you are using doesn't have a lens mount for the tripod, which means your camera will not be as stable when on the tripod. Just pushing on the shutter can make the camera shake enough to blur.
Remember, it takes very little camera shake to make the picture seem just slightly out of focus, just enough to seem slightly soft, and not tack sharp.
- David A. Bliss

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21332

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21332

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Volunteer Photography for Community Service
I'm an 18-year-old high school student looking to volunteer in the Boston area one day a week for a minimum of 6 hours (it's a school project) doing some sort of photography. The photographic work has to be some sort of community service so it can't be news photography or anything like that. I have a Nikon D50 with the 18-55 and 55-200 kit lenses and a bit of experience. I'm willing to do anything, basically. Send me an email if you know anything or need me! Thanks! Eli
- Eli C

ANSWER 1:
I've heard of people going down to the local animal shelter and photographing the animals for the shelter's Web site, I doubt that would take 6 hours a week, though.
- Brendan Knell

ANSWER 2:
Funny you should mention that. My backup plan was just to work at the local shelter where I volunteered over the summer. I can certainly combine the two but I was looking for something more photography-oriented. Thanks, though!
- Eli C

ANSWER 3:
I just searched the forum and came up with a thread that might help:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=17274
- Brendan Knell

ANSWER 4:
Eli,
Check around for community Christmas parties for children. Or local club like Lions, Eagles, Shriners, and offer your services if they have children's Christmas parties. You call the organizers and I bet they love to have you.
- Kerby L. Pfrangle

See Kerby's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 5:
Another thought is to check with hospitals that have Christmas parties for the children. What a special gift for the child's family.
- Kerby L. Pfrangle

See Kerby's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 6:
Eli, we just did a tea at a retirement home and I was fortunate to get each person's picture. I brought a small 4x6 photo printer, and the home provided lovely frames for each picture. Most of the people enjoyed having their pictures taken. A very rewarding experience for photo lovers such as ourselves.
- Janet Kinney

ANSWER 7:
Eli,
My daughter did something similar. One place she took pics was at a local elementary school for their bulletin board. She had to get permission from the principal, and the pictures could only be used at the school. She mostly took photos of special events like awards assemblies or parties but also lunch time and recess. They loved it. She also contributed a disc of all the pictures at the end of the semester to the school.
- Barbara Sherman

ANSWER 8:
Check with the local Masonic Lodge (the Masons). They do a lot of work with under-privileged kids, and they are usually a good bunch of guys (my dad's a Mason).
- eric brown

ANSWER 9:
Eli,
I am just getting a photo business started, and I have done work for the Heart Gallery, which is a program to photograph children in the adoption systems around the country to try and help find parents. They are great kids, and it is a great program. Go to www.adoptuskids.org to find a project near you.
- Glenn Donaghy

ANSWER 10:
Glenn,
That's exactly what I was looking for! I am sending emails and getting in touch with a few adoption organizations at the moment. Hope everything works out. Thanks to all of you for your answers!
- Eli C

ANSWER 11:
Eli,
My wife, who does a lot of portrait photography, suggests looking for women's shelters, planned parenthood places, and support groups for pregnant teens, and offer to shoot portraits of kids and families. They probably would never be able to afford to pay for portraits, and they may be the only pictures they get of their children.
- Anthony Gedris

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=21235

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=21235

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