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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Tuesday, September 20, 2005
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* SPOTLIGHT: BetterPhoto's Fall Online Courses: Our Best Schedule Yet!
* BETTERPHOTO: Getting Your Own Web Site Is Easy at BetterPhoto
* BETTERPHOTO: Once Every 19 Years: Re-visiting an Ansel Adams Image
* FEATURED GALLERY: Focus on Waterfall Pictures
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: The Detective and the Photographer / Look Who's Shooting
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: The Best Light for Your Travel Scenes ... by Brenda Tharp
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Raw to Smaller JPEG or TIFF
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Backdrop Materials
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Best Starting Tools for Home Studio
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Do I Need a Model Release?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: When You Must Shoot In Midday Sunlight
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Studio Lights Problem
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Online Photo Processing Labs
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: To Polarize or Not To Polarize
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: RGB Setting: What's the Best?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Eye Glare with a Digital Camera
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Exposure Settings for Low-Light Action Shots
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Tips for Taking Wedding Pictures


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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BetterPhoto's Fall Online Courses: Our Best Schedule Yet!
We have so many fine online photo courses on tap for the next session. Here's a sampling:
  • The Four Essential Filters for Film and Digital Cameras
  • Fashion and Beauty: Intro to Fashion Photography
  • The Business of Photography
  • Stock Photography
  • People Photography Up-Close and Personal
  • How to Photograph Animals & Wildlife
  • Beyond the Postcard: Creating Memorable Travel Photos
  • Bare Bones Digital Photography
  • Digital Slide Shows
  • Field Techniques: Light and Composition
Check out BetterPhoto's entire school schedule at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 230th issue of SnapShot!

Hi {FirstName}

September is rolling right along, and we're looking forward to such an awesome fall school session. But if you are planning to sign up for an online photo course, you'd better hurry. Some classes have already filled up, while others are nearing capacity. Check out the schedule at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp

The BetterPhoto Summit was a great success, and this first-ever event lives on in a Summit Q&A thread:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/QnAdetail.asp?threadID=17956

In this issue of SnapShot, don't miss instructor/author Brenda Tharp's excellent Photo Tip: "The Best Light for Your Travel Scenes". Also, we have yet another great collection of questions and answers, including input from instructors Peter Burian and Charlie Borland.

That's it for now. Have a wonderful week of photography.
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Getting Your Own Web Site Is Easy at BetterPhoto

Are you ready to share more photos, get more exposure, even sell your photos? If so, check out BetterPhoto.com's terrific Deluxe BetterPholios™. Whichever option you choose (the "standard" Deluxe BetterPholio™ or the upgraded Deluxe Pro version), you'll get a complete package - Web site design, Web hosting, and domain name registration. And it's all available for a really reasonable price. For details:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs.asp


*****
Once Every 19 Years: Re-visiting an Ansel Adams Image

A team of Texas astronomers has found that one of Ansel Adams' photos from Glacier Point, Yosemite National Park, was misdated by 4 years, according to an Los Angeles Times article that appeared in the Seattle Times. The Texas University astronomers pinpointed the clock ticking to a rare encore performance on September 16, 2005, re-creating the same dance of the moon and mountains captured by Adams a half a century ago.

The cycle repeats itself once only every 19 years. It was long believed that the widely published photograph was shot in 1944. But the Texas State astronomers have sleuthed through celestial history, plotted lunar phases, crafted computer programs, crafted angles to determine the exact spot and time where the legendary photographer snapped the shutter. It actually occurred on Sept. 15, 1948, at 7:03 PDT, plus or minus a few seconds. A detailed study can be found in the October issue of Sky & Telescope magazine.

The shot depicts an ethereal mix of land and sky, looking away from Yosemite Valley southeast toward the jagged peaks of the Clark Range. Adams never recorded an exact date. The San Marcos, Texas, university team used topographical maps and sky photographs to triangulate the location of Adams' camera to a spot near the Geology Hut halfway between Glacier Point's cliff-side railing and the parking lot. With that information, the team plotted the moon's location in Adams' photo. The moon's lunar face helped further pinpoint the exact location. The moon's "lava seas" and rimmed craters were discernable as reference points. Given the moon's penchant for rocking and nooding ever so slightly as it cycles through the sky, another third of the suspected dates could be discarded.

The team's final clues were earthbound shadows. A particular shadow cast on a distant ridge by the setting sun brought further focus. Accounting for atmospheric refraction and the earth's curvature, the team concluded that "autumn Moon" was shot in mid-September 1948, not 1944 as previously believed.

For only the third time since the shutter was originally snapped, between 6:50 and 6:52 pm, September 15, 2005, was the same celestial configuration available for photographing of the same golden scene captured by Adams - a re-creation of a moment in time.


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FEATURED GALLERY
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Focus on Waterfall Pictures
Water in motion - specifically, the waterfall - is always a favorite subject of BetterPhoto shooters. Check out this gallery and see for yourself. Note that many of the images make use of a slow shutter speed in order to capture a soft-and-silky look. This is accomplished with most or all of the following: low ISO, small aperture (high f/number), low light (heavy overcast or shade, or very late or very early in the day), and perhaps even a deep-tinted filter (i.e., polarizer or neutral-density). View these outstanding photos at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=495

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
In this episode of the old TV show "Columbo", how does the detective figure out that the photographer (played by Dick Van Dyke) is the murderer?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Penny Steiner is:
A famous photographer, Paul Galesco kills his wife and Colombo figures it out by the negatives in his darkroom.
Episode aired in 1974.

Editor's Note: Good answer, Penny. Also, an excellent answer from Todd W.!

See Penny 's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=27123

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Look Who's Shooting - entered by BetterPhoto member Kerry Drager

A famous model/actress has taken up photography in a serious way. As a result, she's now talking about having to "crank up the ISO" and "opening the aperture up" in low light. "A year ago," she recently told a camera magazine, "I didn't know what those words meant". Her favorite subject, by the way, is a certain rock guitarist. ... Now for the question: Who is this model/actress? Bonus question (but not officially part of the quiz): Who is the musician?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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The Best Light for Your Travel Scenes ... by Brenda Tharp

"Rise early, and stay out late" is my motto wherever I am traveling. When you work the edges of day and night, you get the most interesting light and you can create more mood-evoking images of your destinations. Plan your evening meals to be early or late - so that you don't miss the great light. And for those hotels that offer breakfast included? You might get them to put it out early for you or prepare a boxed breakfast to go. Or simply come back for breakfast after the best morning light has come and gone.

Check out Brenda Tharp's online photo courses:



Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
  • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
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You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Raw to Smaller JPEG or TIFF
I have begun to use RAW format with my Nikon D70 and am pleased with the results. What is the most efficient way to share the images with family who want to make prints, send by e-mail, etc. but can't or don't want to handle the large RAW file size. Thanks!
- Anne M. Guidry

ANSWER 1:
Anne, I change the images to JPG as it is close to universal. If the person wants to print what you send them, then save to the large to medium size JPG . If you just want to share them on the Web, then a medium to small size will do. Generally speaking, the size remains large (ie: RAW 6 MGs to a max JPG of 5 MGs) when going from a RAW file to a JPG. But if the question is a universal viewer, then I would go with a JPG. If the question is size of file, then you will have to change the image size by how you save it or manipulation within the image and then save it. As usual, there is more than one way to "skin a cat"! Hope this helps! Eti
P.S.: I shoot with a D70 as well.
- Eti Swinford

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19343

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19343

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NEW QUESTION 2: Backdrop Materials
Does anyone know that, if I buy my own muslin material to make a backdrop, will the seam be visable in my pictures? Other than muslin, what is another good material to use? I heard that you can also use vinyl. Any help would be great.
- Megan McKenzie

ANSWER 1:
If you buy the muslin in 108 or 120 inches, you shouldn't have a seam. You can get it this wide at most fabric stores ... at Hobby Lobby, it's about $5.97 regular price, but they run 33-percent off and on!
- Michelle Ross

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19341

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19341

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NEW QUESTION 3: Best Starting Tools for Home Studio
I have been a hobbyist photographer since I was a teenager and have taken a few photography courses over the years. My dream is to have a studio in my house some day. But, until then, I need to get more experience to justify investing in all the equipment. I am now attempting to start my own portrait business focusing on infants, kids and family portraits. Although I prefer to shoot outdoors as much as possible, I am forced to shoot inside sometimes, especially with infants. I find lighting and backgrounds my biggest challenges, because you don't know what you will find in someone's house.
I use a Canon Rebel XT with the Canon 420EX speedlite. I would love to hear from pros. What basic equipment do you recommend as "have to haves" for portraits, especially indoors for beginners. I don't have all the lighting, backdrops, etc. I would be greatly appreciative of any tips and advice on what I absolutely should invest in at this point. Thank you!
- Leslie A. Browne

ANSWER 1:
Hi Leslie,
Lighting is as important to the success of a photo as composition and subject. There are many ways to learn lighting, including my courses here as well as some Web sites and plenty of books available. There is also a thread here that offers a bunch of tips. When I first learned lighting I purchased 3 strobes and a couple of umbrellas to get started as I quickly learned that is how it is done. But if you have plenty of window light, you can use that as available light and reflectors to fill in shadows. But strobes are clearly the way to go, because when photographing people, the strobes will freeze the movement that comes with photographing adults and infants.
Have fun!
Charlie
- Charlie Borland

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Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - www.borlandphoto.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography
Lighting for Commercial Photography
Advanced Lighting for Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting (2nd Session)
The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19321

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19321

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NEW QUESTION 4: Do I Need a Model Release?
Do I need a model release if the picture is backlit and the person only appears in shadow? It is a a partial profile shot.
- Jane Holestine

ANSWER 1:
Everything I've seen says the person has to be recognizable for you to need a release.
- Carolyn Fletcher

See Carolyn's Premium BetterPholio™

Visit PickYourShots.com - Carolyn's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Jane,
The issue of photo releases is often misunderstood. But the rule should be "get them" ... period. As a veteran of 30 years stock shooting, owning two photo agencies myself, and representation by 10 different agencies during that time, I have personally been "accused" of photographing someone and not obtaining a release. Although I was able to prove that I had a release for the person who was in the photograph, I had to spend considerable time to prove that the person in the photo was not my accuser.

That is where we are in the state of this issue. If you are accused of not having a release, the burden is on you to prove it is not the accuser in the photograph, rather than they having to prove it is themselves. Over the years, I have had several photographer/friends pay out thousands to people they had photographed, but failed to get a release, as well as to attorneys to battle these claims. I have seen others being sued when they had a release, because the model didn't like how the photo was used. Whether the photographer won or lost, it costs plenty in legal fees. It is easier to pull a release and prove immediately who is in the photo and that the image is released. It is true that editorial photos often do not need to be released, but that does not mean that you are protected from litigation. Numerous photographers have paid out here as well. A verbal OK is not sufficient either; all they have to do is change their mind. If they saw the photo published once, then published again, they are thinking money and the fact they didn't get paid and you did.

If you want to be represented by a stock agency, they will require releases ... period! They deal with legitimate and false claims every year, and most, if not all, will not accept any image without a release, no matter how great the shot. No matter whether it is a silhouette, and hand or foot, they want a release. And your agency contract specifically states that you agree to provide a release for any image on file at the agency, upon request ... and that you will be responsible and hold the agency harmless for any and all claims arising from model release issues. AND that you will reimburse the agency for all costs, losses, and damage awards they incur and related to a model release issue for one of your images.

At Fogstock, we require them and ask the photographer to provide them within 48 hours of our request. Many ad agencies, designers, etc., who buy stock will often ask for the release in advance of purchasing the rights to use the image. They don't want any hassles either. I not only get a release from everybody, but I also have a "Photo-shoot agreement" that says they will receive no more compensation that what we agree to up front, and I put it in writing.

Unfortunately, our legal system allows anybody to sue anybody for any reason, so the better you protect yourself, the safer you will be.
- Charlie Borland

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Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - www.borlandphoto.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography
Lighting for Commercial Photography
Advanced Lighting for Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting (2nd Session)
The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography

ANSWER 3:
Thank you, Carolyn and Charlie, for your answers. This was a shot I took at a wedding reception, and I just wanted to enter into the BP contest. Based on Charlie's response, I will pursue the release. Thanks again.
- Jane Holestine

ANSWER 4:
Jane,
You do not need a release for the BP contest or posting on your site. I see I did not address the issue that you get in trouble when you make money from the sale of the image, usually not the display of it.
Charlie
- Charlie Borland

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Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - www.borlandphoto.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography
Lighting for Commercial Photography
Advanced Lighting for Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting (2nd Session)
The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19314

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19314

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: When You Must Shoot In Midday Sunlight
I am shooting with another company that contracts for school sports portraits. Sometimes, the schools require that we shoot at 2:00 pm outdoors in the direct sun. I did this for the first time yesterday, only to come home and see these awful images!!
The best angle to shoot the kids meant the kids were looking directly into the sun. Even having the sun come in from the side caused a lot of squinting. So, we shot with the sun above and slightly behind the subject to avoid the squinting.
I shot with a SB-800 Flash for fill on a Nikon D70 with the standard ED short lens. When the sun went behind the clouds, the images were fine. What I didn't know how to balance was flash output, aperture, ISO, and shutter for the best possible results in the worst possible lighting. Any suggestions out there??
- Tracy Smith

ANSWER 1:
Tracy,
Occasionally I am confronted with a similar situation when shooting commercial jobs outside. We always overpower the sun with flash. What I mean by that is that your approach, which is fine most of the time, uses the sun as the 'key' or main (more powerful) light and your flash as a 'fill' light. I reverse that order, flash being brighter than the sun. The key theory here is that shutter speed controls ambient (sun) light and aperture controls the flash.
To do this, take your camera and flash off any automatic modes and set them to manual. Start with the camera set on manual and take a meter reading of the kid, or a test subject before the kids arrive so you are ready to go. Let's say the camera says f/8 at 1/250th and the test shot shows exactly the ugly light you describe. Now change the f/stop to f/11 and you are now underexposing the ambient light 1 stop. Turn on the flash and with it on manual, choose a power setting to give you f/11 output. You can also leave it on auto TTL and you should get the correct output. Or turn the flash to manual and set the output for f/11. Experiment with someone, so you have this down before the next job.
- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - www.borlandphoto.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography
Lighting for Commercial Photography
Advanced Lighting for Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting (2nd Session)
The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography

ANSWER 2:
Thanks for the suggestions. I will try it out tomorrow if I am able to stand in the sun after getting cooked in it today!!!
- Tracy Smith

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19313

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19313

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Studio Lights Problem
The other day I went to a studio and took some photos using studio flashes. I took two rolls, one b&W, which I developed at home, and one color, which I took to the store to be developed. Both came out with the same problem. Most of the frames were not even exposed, and some had only one-third of the frame exposed (the top third of the negative was correctly exposed and the rest completely blank). I checked my camera, and it seems to be working fine, plus I shot another roll at home and it came out OK. Could it be that I used shutter speed that was too fast (I did use a photometer)? Could it be that the mirror was getting stuck? Any other ideas?
Thanks!
- Daniela Meli

ANSWER 1:
Daniela,
You have answered your question - shutter speed. You had too fast of a shutter speed set for the flash to sync with the shutter speed. Cameras vary, but average 1/125 -1/250 as the fastest shutter speed you can use. If you set your camera manually to 1/60, you should always be fine. A flash meter only helps you with f/stop but doesnt know your camera sync speed.
- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - www.borlandphoto.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography
Lighting for Commercial Photography
Advanced Lighting for Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting (2nd Session)
The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19294

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19294

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Online Photo Processing Labs
What online digital photo processing labs do any of you recommend? I have my first photo shoot in a few days and I would like to find a place where I can email my photos and have them mailed to me via snail mail. I need a place with great quality and that has a variety of selection (glossy, matte, canvas, etc. and different sizes) for my customers. I have tried searching, but I am afraid because I'm not familiar with the sites I have found, and don't know about their reputations. Thanks in advance for any info you can share.
- Amber Stephens

ANSWER 1:
Amber: There are many good on-line photofinishers but I love using www.shutterfly.com Their prices are reasonable but like most wholesalers, they do not offer a variety of paper types. But here's one you should definitely check out: www.mpix.com
Also, see www.imagexperts.com
I'm sure that one of these two will have the services that you need.
Regards,
Peter Burian, Digital Photography course Instructor
- Peter K. Burian

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ANSWER 2:
Thank you, Peter. I appreciate your information!!! Thanks for taking the time to write.
- Amber Stephens

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19287

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19287

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: To Polarize or Not To Polarize
Recently, I took a cruise to Aruba. I shot almost all my pictures with a polarizer. Even though the skies were darkened, almost to purple, I was somewhat disappointed in the way the water appeared. I'm heading to Tahiti for a once in a lifetime trip. I know how polarizers intensify the blue of skies, and intensify greens of foliage, but it seems that they can sometimes rob color from the beautiful turquoise green waters and also, suppress details. Any suggestions for resolving this dilemma?
- Tim L. Hansen

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ANSWER 1:
The effects of the polarizer can be seen in the viewfinder. As you rotate it, note how it changes the appearance of the water. The polarizer can remove cloud reflections on the water, bright highlights off the tops of waves, etc. If you want these elements retained, then turn the polarizer to get what you want. But to keep these elements, you'll likely lose some of the saturation of the sky. It may be that instead of a polarizer you need a graduated neutral-density filter instead.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
And how does the graduated neutral density filter compare to the polarizer? What does it do? I purchased a circular polarizer for my camera but have only used it outside a few times. The sky did look beautiful, but haven't tried it on water.
- Kathy L. Pollick

ANSWER 3:
Without any filtering, the sky will often be "blown out" or rendered white because it is so much brighter than the terrestrial scene. The film or digital sensor does not have the range to record such a great disparity in brightness.
The polarizer will saturate the sky and remove reflections off water/glass, but darkens the entire scene equally. A graduated neutral-density filter is half dark and half clear so that the sky can be darkened to more closely match its exposure with the foreground.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 4:
Well, I wish I would have known that when I bought my polarizing filter. I got it purposely for brightening the sky, but I didn't know it darkened everything equally. Now I'll have to go buy the neutral density filter. That sounds more like what I wanted. Does that affect water any? Of course, I haven't learned to photograph water yet, but to get either the water photographed as the "flowing" effect or the "stopped motion" effect, does the density filter have any bearing on how it appears, colorwise?
- Kathy L. Pollick

ANSWER 5:
Neutral density filters block all light and colors equally. To get slower shutter speeds for flowing water, one would use a regular neutral-density filter rather than a graduated ND. For stopped motion, one needs higher shutter speeds, so would not use a neutral density or other light-blocking filter.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 6:
Kathy: A polarizer does not really darken everything. It wipes glare from reflective surfaces, so colors are richer. And if the sky is blue, it makes the blue richer and deeper.
Also, the polarizer increases color contrast.
But the effect can be excessive at times. Watch the effect changing in the viewfinder as you rotate the polarizer. When it looks right (and not excessive), take the shot.
Is it also possible that your photos are underexposed? For example, too dark because of inadequate exposure? You should be able to fix that if it's not too serious. In Adobe programs, Levels can be very useful for that purpose. Or Brightness. (IMAGE ... ADJUST ... LEVELS or BRIGHTNESS/CONTRAST)
Regards
Peter Burian, Digital Photography instructor
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/PBN01.asp
- Peter K. Burian

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Visit Peter Burian's Web Site - www.peterkburian.com

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Digital Photography with Peter Burian

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19271

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19271

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NEW QUESTION 9: RGB Setting: What's the Best?
I have the Canon Rebel xt and I'm wondering, should I set it to sRGB or Adobe RGB? I use elements 3.0 and I'd like to know what is better to have my camera set to?
- Mike Carpenter

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ANSWER 1:
These are color spaces, and should be selected based on your working environment from data capture through the printing process. Adobe RGB has a wider color gamut than sRGB, and thus would be the better choice.
However, it is my understanding that some Windows versions default to sRGB, which may or may not present an issue in this matter. If you can work in Adobe RGB from camera to print-ready, it is by far the better choice.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net
- Michael H. Cothran

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ANSWER 2:
I was also wondering which to use - I have Windows XP Pro. Any suggestions as to which is better for XP Pro. Many thanks.
- Robyn Ball

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ANSWER 3:
Robyn: In a nutshell, Adobe RGB is ideal if you plan to print your images. And sRGB is ideal for images for Internet use.
But as Michael said, not all image editing programs support the Adobe RGB format. All Adobe programs do. So, it depends on what imaging software you use, and not what operating system (XP) that you have.
Regards,
Peter Burian, Digital Photography course instructor
- Peter K. Burian

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Visit Peter Burian's Web Site - www.peterkburian.com

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ANSWER 4:
Tks Peter. I have Photoshop CS (but don't quite know what I'm doing with it yet!) I also just use Microsoft Picture Editor, and also have the program my Canon Eos3D came with (I multi-task hey??). So ... some pix are uploaded to the net, others are saved in albums on my laptop, others will/might be printed! So ... to be on the safe side, would you suggest sRGB which would cover me for most things? Sorry to sound confused - I am :) LOL
- Robyn Ball

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ANSWER 5:
Robyn: If you use 90 percent of your images for the Web or e-mail, just set your camera to sRGB. That's fine for prints you order from labs too. (They work with sRGB files.)
But if you often want to print images yourself, on your own inkjet printer, set the camera to Adobe RGB. You can easily convert those images to sRGB for Web or e-mail use. Here's how:
1. Set your camera to shoot in Adobe RGB color space.
2. When you open the image in Photoshop, retain Adobe RGB if a pop up asks you if you want to do so.
3. These images will be perfect for printing.
4. If you want to use some images for the Web or e-mail ....
A) Take an image, downsize it, and Save As JPEG. If the large file was a JPEG too, give the small file a new name.
e.g. Large file was: Mary_at_Beach.jpg
Name the small file Mary_at_Beach_Web.jpg
B) Now, convert the small file to sRGB.
From the items at the top of your screen, select IMAGE.
Then, IMAGE ... MODE ... CONVERT TO PROFILE.
Select sRGB from the list and click OK.

Your small file (for Web or e-mail use) is now in the sRGB color space.
Regards,
Peter Burian, Digital Photo course instructor
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/PBN01.asp

- Peter K. Burian

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NEW QUESTION 10: Eye Glare with a Digital Camera
I just purchased a Kodak Easyshare C330 digital camera. This is my first digital camera. I am having a problem with "eye glare" in the pictures that I am taking. The problem is not "red eye", but there is a glare in the eye due to reflection from the flash. Kodak is telling me this is normal. It does not sound normal to me. Please help.
- Howard J. Mitchell

ANSWER 1:
HI, is it just a small dot of light? Kind of like a twinkle in the eye? If so, that's generally a good thing. That's a "catch-light" that people pay big bucks for...:-)
If not, just ask people to look at your hand on either side of the camera, so the flash doesn't get in their eyes.
Bob
- Bob Cournoyer

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NEW QUESTION 11: Exposure Settings for Low-Light Action Shots
I have a Minolta Maxxum 7D with a Tokina AT-X Pro 80-200 zoom f1:2.8 lens. I am attempting to shoot night football games from the sidelines. As it gets darker, I have a challenge having crisp, clear action shots with a fast enough shutter speed that allows enough light. I use f2.8 and I try to adjust the EV but find that in doing that, it often picks too slow of a shutter speed to allow the light it needs. I am shooting with manual settings for the most part. What settings should I be using to get the clear, crisp action shots without blurring, especially when I can't always use flash? Thank you in advance.
- Chris

ANSWER 1:
To keep the shutter speed as high as possible, shoot in aperture priority with the lens wide open. If it is a small field with small stands or openings, then you may be getting dark/black backgrounds that fool the meter into longer-than-necessary shutter speeds. Once the sun is down and all light is coming from the field lights, take a meter reading off the grass (which is close to 18-percent gray toned), and simply set that exposure in manual.

Otherwise:
(a) Set the ISO higher.
(b) Shoot in RAW, which records greater detail in otherwise underexposed images that can be brought out in post-processing.
- Jon Close

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Tips for Taking Wedding Pictures
This might sound like a dumb question, but to those of you that do paid weddings; do you ever use a tripod when taking the wedding pictures? We had a photographer (she's a hobby photographer, not a pro) who just did our daughter's wedding. All the shots were hand-held, and I was under the impression that if you wanted to blow any of the photos up beyond a 5x7, you should have the pix taken on a tripod for sharpness.
- Kathy L. Pollick

ANSWER 1:
Yes, I use a tripod. No, I do not use it for all the shots. I mainly use a tripod for the shots taken in the church during the ceremony without a flash. I have many photos blown up to 16x20, and beyond that were not taken with a tripod and they are plenty sharp. A wedding is a fast-moving event and, for most shots, a tripod is impracticable.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 2:
When I am shooting formals of the bride and groom at a wedding (and bride with Dad, etc.), I tell them to enjoy themselves while I get set up, even though I am standing there ready to shoot. They think I am doing something with my camera, so they relax and, often get quite intimate, smiling and looking lovingly at each other. I shoot THAT, then I pose them for the formals. The unposed shots are usually the best ones.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 3:
Wow, Kerry. Great thing to tell the B&G and Dad/Bride. I am going to try that next time :). It seems that lack of creativity in poses is a common problem among newcomers ...
- Cynthia L. Wanyonyi

ANSWER 4:
Sometimes you can say something like: "Well, Dad, your little girl is grown and married now" and you will get a tear - great shot if you can get it. When shooting a wedding, you have to be part photographer, part wedding coordinator, and part psychologist. Just interact with them a little, and direct them a little. If all you do is pose them, all you will get are posed shots. Posed shots are nice, but it is more important to capture the emotion of the event.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 5:
Hi Kathy,
We shoot around 100 weddings a year. I shoot the weddings where there is a natural bond or attraction to the people, and so on and so on. I hear quite a bit that pros use a tripod, pros don't use autofocus, etc. Kathy, I have found that a good photographer will follow advice for lighting and then develop their own style. Honestly, I never touch a tripod! I have no use for it. I sell 30x40 prints from weddings, they are outstanding. Focus on creativity and lighting and you will be successful!
- Sandy D. Anton

ANSWER 6:
Hi Kathy,
Don't use a tripod if you have a fast enough lens. If you don't have a 2.8 lens, then grab that tripod and bring it along just in case.
- Julie M. Cwik

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ANSWER 7:
Nothing wrong whatsoever with hand-held shots. Flash will stop the action and the image will be sharp regardless of the size of the enlargement. If the situation calls for a tripod, however, one should be used even if all someone will order is a wallet size.
I use a tripod for altar pictures if I want to bring out the light in the beautiful altar area so the background isn't dark. I use it for available light shots when I can't hand-hold the camera due to the shutter speed I need. And I use it when I absolutely must have a perfect horizontal or vertical, where even the slightest tilt would be noticeable, like when I'm matching straight lines in a scene, such as a horizon at a beach. I use it when doing portraits if I have certain props in there, like columns. But, other than all the above, hand-held shots are fine and allow me to work faster and get more shots.
(And Kathy, this is by no means a "dumb question.")
- Maria Melnyk

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