BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THIS ISSUE - Tuesday, September 06, 2005
~~~~~~~~~~~

* SPOTLIGHT: BetterPhoto Summit: A Jam-Packed Event This Weekend!
* BETTERPHOTO: BetterPhoto School: Awesome New Courses for Fall
* BETTERPHOTO: The BetterPhoto Guide to Digital Photography ... by Jim Miotke
* BETTERPHOTO: The New Digicams: Is Thin Actually Worth It?
* FEATURED PLACE: Washington State: Home of the Summit!
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Digital Debut / Detecting a Photo Op
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Light Quality: Soft Vs. Hard ... by Charlie Borland
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Selling to Stock Photo Agencies
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Using Flash Outdoors
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Shoot in Color or in B&W?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: How Many Proofs Are Enough?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Tips for Taking Wedding Pictures
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Color Management Problems
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Images Used on a Web Site
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Proper Digital Scanning
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Displaying Portraits in Public: Any Ideas?
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 3: Is a Backpack a Good Choice?


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

BetterPhoto Summit: A Jam-Packed Event This Weekend!
This is the week! The BetterPhoto Summit takes place this coming weekend - September 10th and 11th in Seattle - and what a jam-packed event we have planned. But if you are thinking of signing up, you'd better hurry: Just 10 spaces are left. A dozen BP instructors will present talks and slide shows, such as:
  • Digital Exposure - Bryan Peterson
  • Making Money with Your Photography - Jim Zuckerman
  • The New Features of Photoshop CS2 - Ben Willmore
  • Camera Raw and Digital Workflow - Jim Miotke
  • 6 Steps Toward More Dynamic Images - Brenda Tharp
  • Flower Photography: Thinking Outside the Box - Tony Sweet
  • Shooting Stock Photography - Charlie Borland
  • Starting Out with Basic Photography - Robin Nichols.
  • Plus, many more programs and instructors!
For all of the Summit details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/summit.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to the 228th issue of SnapShot!

Hi {FirstName}

What an absolutely exciting week ... with the first-ever BetterPhoto Summit coming right up! The Summit promises to be such an enjoyable, educational, and inspirational experience. Join us in Seattle on September 10th and 11th for exciting talks and shows by a dozen top professionals from the BetterPhoto team of online instructors. The Summit schedule was recently updated, so check it out at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/summit.asp

At the same time that we are planning for this weekend's events, we are also looking forward to our best online school schedule ever. See the lineup at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp

In this issue of SnapShot, don't miss yet another fine Photo Tip from BetterPhoto instructor Charlie Borland - this one on light quality - as well as a short article detailing the new ultra-thin digital cameras.

That's it for now. See you in Seattle this weekend!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
BetterPhoto School: Awesome New Courses for Fall
Our next online school schedule is going to be terrific ... our very best ever! New courses include:

  • Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting
  • The Digital Landscape
  • Camera RAW Processing
  • Color Management for Digital Photography
  • The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography
  • People Photography Up-Close and Personal
  • The Magic of Wide-Angle
  • Using Your Digital SLR
  • Ready, Set, Go: Get a Jump Start to Digital Photography.
Check out our entire lineup at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp


*****
The BetterPhoto Guide to Digital Photography ... by Jim Miotke
Mysterious icons, strange jargon, a dizzying array of imaging software and hardware. These stumbling blocks are quickly put aside when you read the terrific new book by BP founder Jim Miotke: "The BetterPhoto Guide to Digital Photography." In this practical, lesson-based guidebook, you'll learn about exposure, file formats and quality settings, low-light photography, digital filters and white balance, composition and lens choice, and much more - all in a handy, bring-along format. For details, or to order your autographed copy, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1311


*****
The New Digicams: Is Thin Actually Worth It?
No question that thinner cameras look sexier than their bulkier competitors, points out a Washington Post article that was just published in the Seattle Times. Under an inch thick, these engineering marvels are easier to tote around, in pocket or purse.

But added style and usefulness can come with their own trade-offs. Price, somewhat surprisingly, isn't the biggest among them. Among the top 10 digital cameras tested, the thinner models were around $90. And for that, you'll get a camera that's not only thinner, but also lighter and sleeker. Nor is picture quality sacrificed.

But, batteries are a major compromise. Most ultra-thin cameras must employ expensive, proprietary rechargeable batteries that are found only in camera stores. Sony's CyberShot DSC-T7, only 0.6-inch thick, even where the LCD cover protrudes, is itself thinner than the rechargeable AA batteries that power the thinner DSC-S90.

All midrange cameras offer both optical viewfinders and color displays screens. But some ultra-small models omit the viewfinder. Both options are preferable.

Useability can and should be the biggest factor in choosing any camera. Some electronic devises can be too small, especially for one's fingers, as is with a few of the ultra-thin cameras. Important: Never make a purchase without a hands-on trial.


back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FEATURED PLACE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Washington State: Home of the Summit!
If you're attending this weekend's BetterPhoto Summit, plan to arrive early or stay late ... after all, Seattle and the rest of Washington state offers so many photo ops. For example, the BP gallery features awesome images of beautiful mountain scenes, seascapes, rural landscapes, and, of course, the Seattle skyline and other cityscape shots. For ideas and inspiration, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=212

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Last week, we asked:
The first totally digital camera for consumers recorded images in black and white, and the photo resolution was 90,000 pixels (less than 1/10th megapixel). What year did this camera debut?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Robert Strain is:
1990 - The Dycam Model 1/Logitech FotoMan

Editor's Note: Right you are, Robert! That was the first entirely digital camera for consumers ... according to the "Digital Technology Timeline" in the April issue of American Photo magazine - from BP instructor Jeff Wignall's book The Joy of Digital Photography. Some other key digital dates from the timeline:
1972: Texas Instruments files the first patent for a filmless electronic camera.
1975: Eastman Kodak produces an operation electronic sill-image camera, one of the first. It recorded images onto cassette videotape.

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Detecting a Photo Op - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

In which episode of the TV show "Agatha Christie's Poirot" does the famous detective, known for using his "little grey cells", photograph Inspector Japp while the two are sightseeing in Brussels, Belgium?


Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Light Quality: Soft Vs. Hard ... by Charlie Borland

The quality of light is described by how hard or soft the shadow created by the light source is. Soft light and hard light are determined by the size of the light source in relation to the subject. Generally, the larger, more diffused the light source, the softer the light quality and shadows.

If you have hard sunlight on your subject, the shadows are going to have hard edges. When the clouds cover the sun, a huge diffuser has been placed over the light source and the shadows become softer. When you place a diffuser in front of a hard light source and close to it, the shadows cast by the subject are as hard as if the diffuser wasn't used. The farther you move the diffuser away from the light source and closer to the subject, the softer the shadow edges become. The idea here is that the larger the light source in relation to the subject, the softer the light.

Check out Charlie Borland's online courses here at BetterPhoto.com:



Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
  • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
  • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
  • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NEW QUESTION 1: Selling to Stock Photo Agencies
Does anyone have any information on selling to Stock Photo Agencies? Is it difficult to get into? Any help on this would be appriciated. Thanks!
- Jeaneen S. Rider

ANSWER 1:
Hi Jeaneen,
Good question! Instructor/photographer Charlie Borland, who teaches the Stock Photography online course right here at BetterPhoto, has written an excellent article on the subject:
Stock Photography: How to Join an Agency

Hope this helps!
Kerry

- Kerry Drager

See Kerry Drager's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Kerry Drager's Web Site - www.KerryDrager.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
Point, Think, and Shoot: Beyond the Snapshot
Field Techniques: Light and Composition
4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups
4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups (2nd Session)

ANSWER 2:
Thanks so much, Kerry. I will read the article. I have been looking for a course to take on photography. Maybe this will be the one. Thanks for your help ...
- Jeaneen S. Rider

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19055

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19055

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Using Flash Outdoors
I just bought the SB-800 for use with my D-70. I am going to practice taking some shots of my daughter later in the day ... and I am curious about angling the flash head. Should I angle it at 45 degrees using the diffusion dome? Or use the built in bounce card? (Remember, this is for outdoor portraits.) Thanks!
- Linda L. Clark

See Linda's Premium BetterPholio™

Visit familyfotos4u.com - Linda's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Outdoors, there is no ceiling to bounce the light. Do not angle the head 45 degrees, use direct flash. Using the diffusion dome or built-in wide panel will help make it a softer fill light.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
Thanks! That's what I thought ... that I should definitely aim it direct on. But two people who I work with told me that they angle it ... and I was thinking, "But what the heck is it bouncing off of?" lol.
- Linda L. Clark

See Linda's Premium BetterPholio™

Visit familyfotos4u.com - Linda's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19033

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19033

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Shoot in Color or in B&W?
I usually try to take all photos in color and then convert to B&W/grayscale in PhotoShop later (so I always have the option of a color image). For those more experienced photographers out there ... would you suggest shooting in black-and-white for photos that I know I only want in B&W? How much of a difference is there in the quality of the print? Thanks!
- Emily

ANSWER 1:
Personally, I would shoot in color and convert to black and white later. Sometimes I have had the camera in black and white and forgot to turn it back for some nice colorful images. I definitely would do color and then make it a point to see what it looks like in black and white before you keep it only in color. Hope this helps!
- Andrew Laverghetta

See Andrew's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19018

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19018

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 4: How Many Proofs Are Enough?
Hey everyone! I need help. I just did my first newborn shoot, and since the baby was almost 3 weeks, she was pretty fussy. I got some beautiful shots, but only about 25 images that I can show to the client. Is that enough? I've seen a lot of sites where photographers promised 35-40 proofs. Any advice or suggestions? And does it even matter? Are 25 really good proofs better than 40 OK ones?
- Christy Denard-Hall

See Christy's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Twenty-five good proofs are far better than 40 OK ones. You don't want to show your clients anything that is not a good shot. It reflects bad on you, even if it is not your fault. If they can't pick out what they want from 25 pictures, they are just too picky. Show them quality, not quantity.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 2:
I did my first young child(11 months) on Tuesday. He went one round and about 15 minutes, and maybe 10 shots he was getting tired. So mom asked if I had time to wait while he took a short nap and a bottle. This is a friend, and I wasn't busy, so she left and came back in 45 minutes and we started again. It took about 20 more minutes and he was done. LOL. I asked her how many shots she expected. She said if she had 3 or 4, she would be happy. I ended up giving her around 15-18, plus I made some different collages because I knew she was wanting one. She was thrilled and placed a $200 order!
I charge a $35 sitting fee as a base. If they want more than 3 locations or outfits, it's $10/each one more. I'm thinking if you can give at least 15 good proofs for an infant that you will be fine. For a young child up to age 4 or 5, I'd say you might even get less because they are going to start giving you those goofy faces, slouching, etc., but I would try to stay at around the 15-20 mark for them also. I did some dance girls and two of the girls I had about 8 or 9 proofs each, and another girl (which we had more time) had probably 15-20. Another time, I did a boy, and his mom told me she wanted a few 4x5 for their desks and a collage, so I knew it wouldn't be a lot of enlargements. I think she had about 7 or 8 proofs and that was it, and she was fine with that.
Seniors - as mentioned above - will depend on outfits and locations. But the two senior girls I did had between 80-100 proofs. One ended up picking 5 poses, and another picked about 7. For boys, I'm guessing the proof numbers could be as low as 30 to around 50, unless they just really enjoy being in front of the camera!!!
- Michelle Ross

See Michelle's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Thanks, Kerry, Amber, and Michelle for all of your feedback. I feel better now. I guess I spent so much time on the shoot that I was a little disappointed that I didn't have more shots. But it is all a learning experience. Thanks again!
- Christy Denard-Hall

See Christy's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19001

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19001

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Tips for Taking Wedding Pictures
This might sound like a dumb question, but to those of you that do paid weddings; do you ever use a tripod when taking the wedding pictures? We had a photographer (she's a hobby photographer, not a pro) who just did our daughter's wedding. All the shots were hand-held, and I was under the impression that if you wanted to blow any of the photos up beyond a 5x7, you should have the pix taken on a tripod for sharpness.
- Kathy L. Pollick

ANSWER 1:
Yes, I use a tripod. No, I do not use it for all the shots. I mainly use a tripod for the shots taken in the church during the ceremony without a flash. I have many photos blown up to 16x20, and beyond that were not taken with a tripod and they are plenty sharp. A wedding is a fast-moving event and, for most shots, a tripod is impracticable.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 2:
When I am shooting formals of the bride and groom at a wedding (and bride with Dad, etc.), I tell them to enjoy themselves while I get set up, even though I am standing there ready to shoot. They think I am doing something with my camera, so they relax and, often get quite intimate, smiling and looking lovingly at each other. I shoot THAT, then I pose them for the formals. The unposed shots are usually the best ones.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 3:
Wow, Kerry. Great thing to tell the B&G and Dad/Bride. I am going to try that next time :). It seems that lack of creativity in poses is a common problem among newcomers...
- Cynthia L. Wanyonyi

ANSWER 4:
Sometimes you can something like: "Well, Dad, your little girl is grown and married now" and you will get a tear - great shot if you can get it. When shooting a wedding, you have to be part photographer, part wedding coordinator, and part psychologist. Just interact with them a little, and direct them a little. If all you do is pose them, all you will get are posed shots. Posed shots are nice, but it is more important to capture the emotion of the event.
- Kerry L. Walker

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=19000

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=19000

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Color Management Problems
I am having problems with my color management system. My Rebel is set to adobe RGB. I have a HPPhoto 7960 printer, and my monitor is Adobe Gamma-calibrated. What do I set my printer to print colors so that all match? Do I use SRGB, Adobe 1998, ICC? I am confused. A big thanks for any help.
- Martha A. Rumley

ANSWER 1:
Martha -
I think you are confused thinking you HAVE to set your file to a particular color space. This is not true. You can choose whatever color space you wish - then calibrate your monitor to that space.
That said, I would strongly recommend Adobe RGB 1998. It has the widest color gamut, I believe.
Adobe Gamma is a good way to calibrate your monitor if you don't have a spyder. It is not as accurate, and you may need to tweak your monitor a few times after running test prints.
Also, be sure to use the correct profile set up for your particular paper and ink. If you are using a third-party paper (and/or ink), you may need to have a custom profile made for your HPP printer.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net
- Michael H. Cothran

See Michael's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18988

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18988

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Images Used on a Web Site
A high school administrator recently asked if I would mind them using my candid shots of sporting events on the school Web site. How do I handle model releases for this? Is this my responsibility or the school's? (I am not making $$ on this.) Most of the athletes are under 18. Thanks for any help! Kristi Geelan
- Kristi G

ANSWER 1:
You would not need a model release, as this is considered editorial use, not commercial use - just like the school yearbook.
- Kerry L. Walker

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18955

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18955

back to top

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Proper Digital Scanning
I'm having a heck of a time with scanning my negatives or digital. I can't seem to get it. Any help would be appreciated. I like to blow pictures up sometimes to 30x40. So when I scan negatives to computer, do I have to put in all info then? Like BEST resolution and such? Or do I wait and put that info in after I've worked on it, and then am ready to scan it for printing? Thanks!
- sandi

ANSWER 1:
Sandi,
If you want prints that size, you have to scan at the highest possible resolution. Go into Image/Image Size in Photoshop or Elements, and enter 240 in the resolution block, Resample Unchecked. What you will see is a readout of the max printable photo quality size you can expect.
There are programs - Genuine Fractals being one - that will boost your resolution. I haven't used it.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Try stair interpolation. Press Alt+II This will bring up Image size. Check Resample Image and Resolution to 200 pixels/inch. Change Width and Height to percent and change 100% to 110%. Keep increasing the size by 10% each time untill you get to the required file size. Another software program to try is Neat Image. Some say it's easier to use than Genuine Fractals
- Sid Pearce

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18901

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18901

back to top

*****


CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Displaying Portraits in Public: Any Ideas?
Hello everyone,
As a newer photographer, I am interested in displaying some photos in doctor's offices and smaller boutiques throughout my city. I was wondering if anyone had any ideas about how to go about doing this. I didn't know if I should write a letter, or call, or if that's even appropriate. I do a lot of portraits - mainly maternity, newborns, children, etc. - and I thought displaying prints would be a great way to get my name out there.
Has anyone had any experience with this? Would I then pay for the prints to be printed, or do I strike a deal with them? I didn't really think it would be appropriate to 'ask' if I could display prints, and then expect them to pay?
Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks
Sarah
www.uniquelyyouphoto.com
- Sarah Ulrich

ANSWER 1:
Hi, Sarah. I am looking at doing the same thing myself. My plan is to start with my own dentist and doctor, and go from there. Also, if you happen to be somewhere and see that others have photography work displayed, make a comment to the employees about how you yourself are a photographer interested in having your work displayed. My thought was always that I would be giving them the photograph in exchange for letting me display and put out my business cards.
- Joan W

ANSWER 2:
Just a thought. Some ob-gyns might let you hang photos in their office as a nice comfort for the pregnant women. Usually, they will let you put some business cards too. Offer to let them hang your work for a certain amount of time. Sometimes you will find that they are up for a change from regular old decor and would like something new.
Explain that you will bring them in framed and that they will have the option to buy them if they like.
Whatever you do, make sure you have signed model releases from your models/subjects. Also, I would get a separate permission form signed by them saying that they agree to you hanging their photo in such a public place. Yes, the model release should cover that, but I like to do a separate permission form just so they understand what my intentions are.
Hope this helps.
- Liza M. Franco

ANSWER 3:
This is funny that you ask this question, because I work at a doctor's office and just a couple days ago, I asked my boss if I could bring in about 20 or so framed photos and hang them around the office. She was thrilled. I am, however, paying for all the enlargements, and frames, but I will have a business card displayed on each and every one of them. It's a great way for people to see your work, and hopefully get more business. Good luck, and have fun!
- Jen Meehan

See Jen's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
I'm in the process of working this out myself. I just approached my son's pediatrician with the idea, which she fell in love with. After seeing my website and having over half the children as patients, she is eager and willing to let me put photos and frames up in her waiting room and office.
Just remember: It's a favor to you. Let them designate what kinds of frames they would like and where. Even let them direct you in what kinds of photos they'd want to see. Then all costs are at your expense. But be sure that you will get something out of it ... leave lots of business cards and pamphlets.
One big plus for me: She has a child and wants to schedule a session with me. What could be better than her good word of mouth to back up my work?
- Amy Anderson

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18883

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18883

back to top

*****


CONTINUING QUESTION 3: Is a Backpack a Good Choice?
I have a Tamrac bag that goes over one shoulder (or diagonally across the chest), which puts too much strain on my lower back due to my camera, which is heavy, a 300mm lens and a wide-angle lens. I'm thinking of getting the Lowepro Micro Trekker 200 backpack. But, is using a backpack too inconvenient if you often switch lenses like I do? That's my main fear. But I'd like a less-conspicuous bag, something much more comfortable and versatile and more room, since I want to expand on my equipment yet something not big and bulky like I'm hiking when I'm really just walking down the street. Can you give me your feedback on your experience using a backpack as your main bag? Thanks!
- Ernestine Lona

ANSWER 1:
I've been using backpacks for many years in the field, and their versatility and comfort level far exceeds the inconvenience of having to take them off all the time. I carry a LOT of gear with me (around 40 lbs.), and the pack distributes the weight evenly.
If it's a real "active" shooting day, I'll strap one camera body with a lens over my shoulder and put a few rolls of film in my pocket. This eliminates taking off the pack every time and possibly missing an opportunity.
If you want to be inconspicuous, get a standard daypack. They look less like they would contain something of value than something with Lowepro written on it.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
I have just a plain black photographer's backpack I bought at Wal-Mart for not much money. It has room for a couple of lenses, the camera, and compartments for your memory sticks/cards, batteries, etc. Plenty of room, and I don't think it was over $25.
- Carolyn Fletcher

See Carolyn's Premium BetterPholio™

Visit PickYourShots.com - Carolyn's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
I used a Tamron shoulder bag for many years. It had a nice padded leather strap, and enough room for all my gear. Still, it was very inconvenient for what I do, which is mostly outdoor photography. I recently purchased a Lowepro Nature Trekker, and have fallen in love with it. I don't find it any less convenient than the shoulder bag; in fact, I usually find it is better. It is much more comfortable, and everything has its place. As for advertising what you are carrying, I always have my tripod either in my hand or strapped to the pack, so it is going to be obvious what is in the pack. The pack stays on my back when I am anywhere I think it might disappear. This makes the pack safer, in my opinion, because I can still be mobile and shoot, and not have to set my gear down like I would have to with a shoulder bag.
One piece of advice, though: Make sure you get a pack with a waist belt. It is much more comfortable, especially if you are going to be carrying it for any distance or time.
- David A. Bliss

ANSWER 4:
I have a backpack and I love it! I have a lot of joint pain from lupus, so I find the backpack to be indispensable. Sure - it's a nuisance to have to keep taking it on and off, but recently I traveled from my home in the Bahamas to Scotland, and had to practically sprint through Heathrow airport between flights - the backpack made it so much easier!!
- Elisabeth Ann Gay

See Elisabeth's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 5:
I also use a small LowePro backpack and have done the "Heathrow" thing, LOL. I absolutely love the bag. There is room for my camera, three lenses, and other needed gear. Just buy a cheapy pack to slide over your good pack if you want to look inconspicuous ... a few holes will accommodate straps.
- Lyn Winans

See Lyn's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 6:
I use the Micro Trekker 200 backpack that I bought 4 months ago. It is very comfortable, and best to walk on mountains. It is well-padded and protects a lot. I use it for my Nikon D70 with a 18-70, an 70-300mm, one flash, filters, belt for tripod, and some accessories. Great idea.
- Alfonso Gordillo

ANSWER 7:
I have a LowePro 200 Micro and couldn't live without it. This may sound strange, but I do a lot of horseback riding to get some of my photos and having the backpack is indispensible. But a HINT ... I turn mine around backwards when I ride so I can get to my camera at once. Looks dumb but it frees my hands up for reining, and it gives me something to rest on, on a long ride!
- Gena A. Tussey

See Gena's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 8:
I also use a backpack. I like it because I shoot a lot of roadside waterfalls and flowers. Usually when I get to where I am shooting I am able to find a spot and leave it open. Makes it easier than digging through my old shoulder bag which had items stored at different levels.
- Michael Antonucci

ANSWER 9:
I have a large camera bag at home to store all of my equipment, but for a shoot or a day out, I bought a large Eddie Bauer messenger bag at Target. I LOVE IT. I can keep everything in there. I have added a few pieces of foam to protect my equipment. It has one strap, and the bag hangs over one shoulder. It stays in place, and everything is right in front of me and I have everything on me without feeling heavy! It was indespensible for my last wedding.
- Carla McCarthick

ANSWER 10:
Carla .... do you get married on a regular basis ?? LOL !! (couldn't resist)
- Lyn Winans

See Lyn's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 11:
LOL ... That was a good one!
- Carla McCarthick

ANSWER 12:
Thanks to everyone that gave their input on the backpack deal. Just got my Tamrac 750 today and used it for about 3 hours tonight, and it made a TREMENDOUS difference. No lower back pain, plenty of storage and free hands to only be concerned with my camera and not worried about my bag. Now I can recommend the same to someone else.
- Ernestine Lona

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18827

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18827

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ASK YOUR OWN QUESTION ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ask a question or answer a few from your fellow photographers:
http://www.betterphoto.com/qnaTOC.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
READ PAST ISSUES OF THE SNAPSHOT NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read previous issues of SnapShot in the BetterPhoto archives:
http://www.betterphoto.com/snapshots.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SIGN UP TO PHOTOFLASH AND THE DIGITAL PICTURE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join the fun and master the arts of traditional or digital photography! Participate or follow along as we discuss topics & lessons, practice assignments, and offer feedback on each others' work. Subscribe to our other two free newsletters - PhotoFlash and the Digital Darkroom - at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Get word of your product or service out to our rapidly growing list of 52525 subscribers.

Until next week, happy shooting!

Thank you,
Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you would rather not receive SnapShot, you may unsubscribe at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeun.asp?e={Email}

To change your email address, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeCOA.asp?e={Email}

If you use a Challenge-Response system for email, please make certain that you can receive our email by adding www.betterphoto.com to your Allow List.

The sender of this email is the BetterPhoto.com, Inc., P.O. Box 2781, Redmond, WA 98052

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Copyright 2005 BetterPhoto.com - All Rights Reserved. No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission. BetterPhoto is a trademark of BetterPhoto.com, Inc.

Copyright 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.