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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Tuesday, August 30, 2005
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* SPOTLIGHT: BetterPhoto Summit: Get Inspired in a Jam-Packed Weekend!
* BETTERPHOTO: New Course: The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography
* BETTERPHOTO: Article: Photographic Model Release Forms ... by Jim Zuckerman
* BETTERPHOTO: Getting Your Own Web Site Is Easy at BetterPhoto
* FEATURED GALLERY: Photographing the Night Sky
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: BP on Talk Radio / Digital Debut
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Are Your Photos Slightly Soft? ... by Kerry Drager
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Proper Digital Scanning
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Purchasing a Flash
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Displaying Portraits in Public: Any Ideas?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Tips for SLR Photography
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Is a Backpack a Good Choice?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Smith Victor Lights: Good Starter Choice?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Focal Length for Shooting Groups
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: How to Conserve Photo Paper When Testing?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Resizing Photos
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Commercial Photos of Country Club
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Model Release for a Parade?


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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BetterPhoto Summit: Get Inspired in a Jam-Packed Weekend!
Less than two weeks away, the first-ever BetterPhoto Summit is going to be a fantastic weekend of information and inspiration. Among the exciting presentations from BP instructors are the following: "Digital Exposure" with Bryan Peterson; "Making Money with Your Photography with Jim Zuckerman; and "The New Features of Photoshop CS2" with Ben Willmore. We hope to see you September 10th and 11th in Seattle. Bonus: On the evening of September 9th, there will be a sneak preview party for Jim Miotke's upcoming DVD: "Photographing Kids". For all the Summit details, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/summit.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 227th issue of SnapShot!

Hi {FirstName}

So many exciting things are happening as August winds down! The first BetterPhoto Summit - September 10th and 11th in Seattle - includes a jam-packed lineup of presentations. See the updated Summit page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/summit.asp

Our next online school schedule is going to be awesome, with so many new courses on tap. For example: "Camera Raw Processing"; "Color Management for Digital Photography"; "The Digital Landscape"; "The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography"; "Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting"; "People Photography Up-Close and Personal"; "The Magic of Wide-Angle"; and "Using Your Digital SLR". Check out our entire lineup at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp

In this issue of SnapShot, don't miss instructor/author Jim Zuckerman's article. It's a fascinating take on the need for obtaining model release forms ... even from a subject who was photographed in a remote area of southwest Africa.

In addition, be sure to read the Questions and Answers, featuring excellent input from two BP instructors: Peter Burian (on sizing for prints) and Charlie Borland (on model releases and lighting).

That's it for now. Have a great week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
New Course: The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography
In Charlie Borland's excellent new online course, you'll receive a broad overview of the outdoor and nature photo industry, gain a good idea of how to shoot your favorite subjects in a marketable way, and then learn how to go about submitting and getting them published. A widely published photographer, Charlie will show you how to organize your office and photo files, Web site strategies, approaching outdoor clients for assignments, promoting your business, pricing your work to receive fair value, and dealing with stock photo agencies. For information:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/CBL06.asp


*****
Article: Photographic Model Release Forms ... by Jim Zuckerman
Stock photo agencies and publishers have become more insistent in the last few years about photographers having model releases, says photographer/author Jim Zuckerman, an active stock shooter who teaches many terrific online courses at BetterPhoto. And this applies even for people in Third World countries who don't have access to a legal system and who have no understanding of the concept of lawsuits. Read Jim's new BP article - "Photographic Model Release Forms: Third World Perspective" - at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/article.asp?id=84


*****
Getting Your Own Web Site Is Easy at BetterPhoto
Are you ready to share more photos, get more exposure, even sell your photos? If so, check out BetterPhoto.com's terrific Deluxe BetterPholios™. Whichever option you choose (the "standard" Deluxe BetterPholio™ or the upgraded Deluxe Pro version), you'll get a complete package - Web site design, Web hosting, and domain name registration. And it's all available for a really reasonable price. For information, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs.asp

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FEATURED GALLERY
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Photographing the Night Sky
A check of BetterPhoto's astrophotography gallery shows so many dramatic images of star trails, shooting stars, and other shots of the twilight and nighttime sky. See the fine imagery of BP members at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=299

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
On Friday, August 19th, two of BetterPhoto's luminaries appeared on a Web radio show. Who are they?


The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Susan Feulner is:
Jim Miotke and Kerry Drager

Editor's Note: Right you are, Susan! The two both appeared on Shutterbug Magazine Radio ... Incidentally, Jim is a regular contributor on the show, with live show time every Friday 12:00pm-1:00pm PST.

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Digital Debut - entered by BetterPhoto member Kerry Drager

The first totally digital camera for consumers recorded images in black and white, and the photo resolution was 90,000 pixels (less than 1/10th megapixel). What year did this camera debut?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Are Your Photos Slightly Soft? ... by Kerry Drager
This is a question that comes up frequently in courses - and, for that matter, throughout BetterPhoto. Jim Miotke's awesome new book - The BetterPhoto Guide to Digital Photography - is so practical and reader-friendly, illustrated by great images, and filled with excellent tips and tricks like this one:

Turn Off Your In-Camera Noise Reduction (by Jim Miotke)
If you're having problems with images not appearing sharp enough, be sure that your camera doesn't have an internal noise reduction function turned on. In the interest of smoothing out any graininess, the noise reduction function can produce results that are a bit on the blurry side.
How you go about turning noise reduction functions on and off will vary from camera to camera. Check your camera manual to see if you have noise reduction, if you can control it, and if so, how. With one of my Canon digital SLR cameras, I go into Menu and choose Custom Functions, and then turn off Long Exposure Noise Reduction. When shooting raw files and importing them via Photoshop's raw converter, I turn the Color Noise Reduction down to 0.

Check out Kerry Drager's online courses:



Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
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P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Proper Digital Scanning
I'm having a heck of a time with scanning my negatives or digital. I can't seem to get it. Any help would be appreciated. I like to blow pictures up sometimes to 30x40. So when I scan negatives to computer, do I have to put in all info then? Like BEST resolution and such? Or do I wait and put that info in after I've worked on it, and then am ready to scan it for printing? Thanks!
- sandi

ANSWER 1:
Sandi,
If you want prints that size, you have to scan at the highest possible resolution. Go into Image/Image Size in Photoshop or Elements, and enter 240 in the resolution block, Resample Unchecked. What you will see is a readout of the max printable photo quality size you can expect.
There are programs - Genuine Fractals being one - that will boost your resolution. I haven't used it.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18901

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18901

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*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Purchasing a Flash
I'm looking into purchasing a flash for my camera. I am clueless as to which one I should but. Does the flash have to be the same brand as my camera? I have no idea?
- Amber D. Jones

ANSWER 1:
There are other brands like Metz and Sunpak that made flashes for a lot of cameras. But you have to make sure the flash you are interested in is compatible with the camera you are using. You can go to their sites and see what cameras each of their flash supports or you can post your question here if you let us know the brand and model of your camera. Your gallery has a few photos taken by the Minolta AF 101R. That one is a point-and-shoot type camera, and I don't see a mount on the camera that accepts external flash.
- Andy Szeto

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18897

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18897

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*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Displaying Portraits in Public: Any Ideas?
Hello everyone,
As a newer photographer, I am interested in displaying some photos in doctor's offices and smaller boutiques throughout my city. I was wondering if anyone had any ideas about how to go about doing this. I didn't know if I should write a letter, or call, or if that's even appropriate. I do a lot of portraits - mainly maternity, newborns, children, etc. - and I thought displaying prints would be a great way to get my name out there.
Has anyone had any experience with this? Would I then pay for the prints to be printed, or do I strike a deal with them? I didn't really think it would be appropriate to 'ask' if I could display prints, and then expect them to pay?
Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks
Sarah
www.uniquelyyouphoto.com
- Sarah Ulrich

ANSWER 1:
Hi, Sarah. I am looking at doing the same thing myself. My plan is to start with my own dentist and doctor, and go from there. Also, if you happen to be somewhere and see that others have photography work displayed, make a comment to the employees about how you yourself are a photographer interested in having your work displayed. My thought was always that I would be giving them the photograph in exchange for letting me display and put out my business cards.
- Joan W

ANSWER 2:
Just a thought. Some ob-gyns might let you hang photos in their office as a nice comfort for the pregnant women. Usually, they will let you put some business cards too. Offer to let them hang your work for a certain amount of time. Sometimes you will find that they are up for a change from regular old decor and would like something new.
Explain that you will bring them in framed and that they will have the option to buy them if they like.
Whatever you do, make sure you have signed model releases from your models/subjects. Also, I would get a separate permission form signed by them saying that they agree to you hanging their photo in such a public place. Yes, the model release should cover that, but I like to do a separate permission form just so they understand what my intentions are.
Hope this helps.
- Liza M. Franco

ANSWER 3:
This is funny that you ask this question, because I work at a doctor's office and just a couple days ago, I asked my boss if I could bring in about 20 or so framed photos and hang them around the office. She was thrilled. I am, however, paying for all the enlargements, and frames, but I will have a business card displayed on each and every one of them. It's a great way for people to see your work, and hopefully get more business. Good luck, and have fun!
- Jen Meehan

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18883

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18883

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Tips for SLR Photography
My husband just bought me a Canon Digital Rebel SLR. I am a picture fanatic but was getting frustrated because my action photos (sports, riding, etc.) with my point-and-shoot camera weren't coming out. Just wondering if anyone had any suggestions for using this camera's features.
- Debbie

ANSWER 1:
Hi Debbie
I shoot with a Minolta camera, so I cannot give you specific suggestions for your Canon; however, as someone who is still learning the ways of better photography I can offer a few suggestions based on my own experiences. My first suggestion is to take the time to read your camera manual carefully. You have no idea how many people skip this important step and then wonder why they have trouble with camera features.
After reading the manual to the point that you have at least a grasp on the important features of your camera, get out and shoot in as many varying conditions as possible. Post your images here for some of the real skilled folks here to critique. If you can handle the criticism (and most of us can, since we are all here to learn), you will gain some important insights. Go ahead and post your mistakes as well as your successes almost everyone here has, at one time or another, posted their mistakes and it is very rare for anyone to be nasty in their criticism. In fact, for the most part, people are kind and very helpful, eager to share their knowledge and willing to tell you how to improve.
I have found the classes here to be great! I highly recommend that you take one or two beginner classes and then move on to the other, more advanced, classes. The bottom line, for me anyway, in learning photography (and most anything) is to read, shoot, and share your work with others who can offer honest critique. I hope that this helps you!
- Irene C. Troy

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ANSWER 2:
I would try taking some pictures using the sports setting instead of manual and then take a look at what shutter speed, etc., your camera used. You can do this with the File Viewer Utility your camera probably came with. Just select the image and the information will come up on the right side of your screen. Then you can try taking some pictures manually and adjust the settings based on what you've learned from the camera.
But if you have the time, it would be great to take a class or two. I have not had any time to take a BetterPhoto class; however, the one photography class I took from a university helped me by leaps and bounds!
- Cherylann Collins

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18864

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18864

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Is a Backpack a Good Choice?
I have a Tamrac bag that goes over one shoulder (or diagonally across the chest), which puts too much strain on my lower back due to my camera, which is heavy, a 300mm lens and a wide-angle lens. I'm thinking of getting the Lowepro Micro Trekker 200 backpack. But, is using a backpack too inconvenient if you often switch lenses like I do? That's my main fear. But I'd like a less-conspicuous bag, something much more comfortable and versatile and more room, since I want to expand on my equipment yet something not big and bulky like I'm hiking when I'm really just walking down the street. Can you give me your feedback on your experience using a backpack as your main bag? Thanks!
- Ernestine Lona

ANSWER 1:
I've been using backpacks for many years in the field, and their versatility and comfort level far exceeds the inconvenience of having to take them off all the time. I carry a LOT of gear with me (around 40 lbs.), and the pack distributes the weight evenly.
If it's a real "active" shooting day, I'll strap one camera body with a lens over my shoulder and put a few rolls of film in my pocket. This eliminates taking off the pack every time and possibly missing an opportunity.
If you want to be inconspicuous, get a standard daypack. They look less like they would contain something of value than something with Lowepro written on it.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
I have just a plain black photographer's backpack I bought at Wal-Mart for not much money. It has room for a couple of lenses, the camera, and compartments for your memory sticks/cards, batteries, etc. Plenty of room, and I don't think it was over $25.
- Carolyn Fletcher

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Visit PickYourShots.com - Carolyn's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
I used a Tamron shoulder bag for many years. It had a nice padded leather strap, and enough room for all my gear. Still, it was very inconvenient for what I do, which is mostly outdoor photography. I recently purchased a Lowepro Nature Trekker, and have fallen in love with it. I don't find it any less convenient than the shoulder bag; in fact, I usually find it is better. It is much more comfortable, and everything has its place. As for advertising what you are carrying, I always have my tripod either in my hand or strapped to the pack, so it is going to be obvious what is in the pack. The pack stays on my back when I am anywhere I think it might disappear. This makes the pack safer, in my opinion, because I can still be mobile and shoot, and not have to set my gear down like I would have to with a shoulder bag.
One piece of advice, though: Make sure you get a pack with a waist belt. It is much more comfortable, especially if you are going to be carrying it for any distance or time.
- David A. Bliss

ANSWER 4:
I have a backpack and I love it! I have a lot of joint pain from lupus, so I find the backpack to be indispensable. Sure - it's a nuisance to have to keep taking it on and off, but recently I traveled from my home in the Bahamas to Scotland, and had to practically sprint through Heathrow airport between flights - the backpack made it so much easier!!
- Elisabeth Ann Gay

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18827

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18827

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Smith Victor Lights: Good Starter Choice?
At first, I was inquiring about Alien Bees, and $600 is a lot to tackle for me, so I found this Smith Victor set for $200 from B+H that includes 3 flashes, stands, 2 umbrellas, sync cords ... etc. Now I know B+H is reputable but is Smith-Victor? I just need something as a starter to get my foot in the door for portrait lighting and things. Thanks for the input. Also, the sync cords are what connect directly to my camera right?
Here's the link:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=121855&is=REG&addedTroughType=categoryNavigation

.justin.
- Justin D. Goeden

ANSWER 1:
Smith Victor is one of the oldest names in studio lighting. They supply lighting to many a TV station and movie company. However, you are comparing apples to oranges here. Alien Bees are strobe lights (flash), while Smith Victor are continuous hot tungsten lights.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net
- Michael H. Cothran

See Michael's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Well, I went to their site and I clicked AC Strobe Light Kits and it came up with the one I want called "3 light thrifty umbrella flash kit", included is 3xFlashlight 45i AC Slave/Master Flash so this leaves me to believe that its a strobe flash like the one on my camera. Am I missing something somewhere? I see that they ALSO have steady tungsten hotlights, but they also have a strobe flash section. So do you think this strobe set would be a good starter for the price? Thanks.
- Justin D. Goeden

ANSWER 3:
Evidently, you're not missing as much as I am! I was not aware that Smith Victor had joined the ranks of strobe manufacturers. I'd compare what's in the box, and how much power each kit has, and base my decision on those criteria. Each doubling of watt seconds = 1 f-stop of light power.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net
- Michael H. Cothran

See Michael's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
Justin
This is a good example of you get what you pay for. These are strobes, but they are only 45-watt seconds. That is less power than a Nikon SB800 on your camera. Bounce those out of the umbrellas and you barely have enough power to take a portrait with your lens wide open. Then if you add a few more people to the scene and need depth of field, you wont have power. Research carefully or you may be disappointed. I have 10 white lightnings, same people that make alien bees and I love the product.
Charlie
- Charlie Borland

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Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - www.borlandphoto.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography
Lighting for Commercial Photography
Advanced Lighting for Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting (2nd Session)
The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography

ANSWER 5:
Great info, Charlie! Always nice to have an experts opinion on this stuff! Any opinions on light meters???
mel
Timeless Images by Mellanie
- Mellanie White

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ANSWER 6:
Thanks, Charlie, so much for your help. Now I understand it a tad more and probably won't go for these. I'll just stick with the alien bees little starter digibee set even though its $600. Thanks again.
- Justin D. Goeden

ANSWER 7:
Mellanie,
I use Sekonic and am still using the same meter for the last 15 years. Get a combo flash/incident so you can meter both light types. I have been using mine so long that I don't know much about the new ones. I think most Sekonic are all flash/ambient these days.
Charlie
- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - www.borlandphoto.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography
Lighting for Commercial Photography
Advanced Lighting for Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Beginners Guide to Strobe Lighting (2nd Session)
The Business of Outdoor and Nature Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18801

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18801

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Focal Length for Shooting Groups
What focal lens are suitable for full-body pictures? Groups of 10-25 people?
- A D. Ross

ANSWER 1:
This is best determined by how far back you can get. I would avoid wide-angle lenses completely, since the poor individuals on the edges will be badly distorted. If you are photographing sports teams outdoors, you should have plenty of room to back up - at least to the point of being able to use a normal lens for whatever size camera you are using.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net
- Michael H. Cothran

See Michael's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Okay, I just took sports pictures ... some were outdoors and some were indoors ... I was able to get far enough back, however ... I hate all of the foreground and background, and then the players look like little ants among the surroundings. LOL Is this just gonna be something I have to live with when you have a bunch on the team? Or are wide-angle lenses supposed to help with that, keeping in mind to leave room on the sides for less distortion. Or should I forget about WA altogether? I used my Tamron 28-75.
- Michelle Ross

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ANSWER 3:
Michelle - I believe the problem is in your "composition." You simply need to arrange your team to better fit the format (2:3) of your camera. You've probably set them up either too squared, or too panoramic, which does not match your image format. It is crucial to set up the team proportionally to your format - presumably 35mm or digital.
If you do this correctly, you will not have any excess "foreground," "background," or team members that look like "ants".
Wide-angle lenses WILL distort those people nearest the edges, unless you leave a lot of space. And leaving a lot of space on the sides, and/or top/bottom is exactly what you are trying desperately to avoid. It's what gives you all that extra, unwanted foreground and background, while making your subjects look like ants. Why do that?
It CAN be done right. Use your Tamron lens in the 50mm-75mm range. You may even be able to tweak down to 35mm, but I would not do it. Good luck.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net
- Michael H. Cothran

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18785

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=18785

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: How to Conserve Photo Paper When Testing?
I have recently purchased a wonderful Epson R2400 photo printer. My interest is in printing large prints. What is the best way to test print images without wasting large photo paper? Many times I will print many test prints before wanting to print the final large print. Thanks,
Paula Leslie
- Paula Leslie

ANSWER 1:
I would say to use either a very low grade of photo paper, or don't even use photo paper. Just use regular printer paper. You won't get great results with regular paper, but after the first few times you use it - then print it on photo paper - you will start to get an idea of what it will look like on photo paper after you print on regular paper.
- Brendan Knell

ANSWER 2:
Another option would be to get a box of 4"x6" paper in the same brand and quality as your large photo paper, and print small test prints.
- Chris A. Vedros

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=18765

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*****


NEW QUESTION 9: Resizing Photos
Is it possible to resize a digital photo by simply increasing dpi? I realize you would have to unlock the original size by unchecking things like "maintain original size" or "lock original size". Is it better to increase the size in inches? Will the dpi automatically increase?

Jpg comes out of my Nikon D70 roughly 3,000 x 2,000, 300 dpi. This file size is not big enough for large size prints according to many printers. Are there any formulas or rules of thumb for upsizing? Thanks in advance for your help.
- Joan Warburton

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ANSWER 1:
I'm sorry, I should have mentioned that I have Photo Shop and Paint Shop Pro. I'm more proficient in PSP. Also, I realize there's distortion in some instances, and that's not an issue. Thanks again.
- Joan Warburton

See Joan's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Joan: An interesting discussion. I have a few comments to add.
Using Photoshop or Elements 2 or 3.
When you select SIZE or RESIZE, a dialog box opens with various options.
1) If you select RESAMPLE IMAGE (put check mark in the box) the software *will* change the image file size if you change the dpi setting.
2) If you do *not* select RESAMPLE, the image file size will not change. Only the dimensions change. See below.
Example:
Let's say you have a JPEG that is 35 inches x 26 inches at 72 dpi. (File size is 14 megabytes.)
A) Do *not* select Resample. Then, change the dpi to 300. The dimensions of the image will change to 8.5x6.4 inches. But the file size will be the same as before.
You could now make an 8.5x6.4 inch print at 300dpi, a high resolution setting great with any photo printer.
Note: If you decide to select 240dpi, also fine with most photo printers, you could make an 8x10.7 inch print. So far, you have not changed the image file size.
B) If you *do* select Resample, the file size will change.
e.g. Using the same example file, let's say you decide you want to make an 10.5 x 14 inch print, using 300dpi.

Make the pertinent changes after checking RESAMPLE. You'll see that Photoshop will now increase file size to 38MB ... using Bicubic Resampling.

Conclusion: It's not ideal to make massive increases in file size. Quality will really suffer.
With most photo printers, you'll get beautiful prints if you set the dpi to 240 in Photoshop or other software.
If you plan to make a large print, Photoshop will increase the file size (if you check Resample.) But not nearly as much as it would if you selected 300dpi. So, image quality should be fine.
With your D70 camera, an increase of about 50% in file size (from 18 megabytes to 24 megabytes for example) should still maintain high image quality. (Unless you plan to make massive prints, selecting 240dpi will not! lead to a huge increase in file size.)
Do sharpening *after* the re-sizing is completed. (FILTER > UNSHARP MASK. Experiment with settings such as 150, 0.9, 1.) Then, proceed to make a print.
Regards,
Peter Burian
Instructor, Digital Photography
- Peter K. Burian

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ANSWER 3:
Thanks so much for clearing this up for us!! We all are eternally grateful!! I mean it!!
- Carolyn Fletcher

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ANSWER 4:
Thank you so much, Peter. I printed out your response and intend to copy it for both printers who told me minimum 400dpi. My feeling is that they've had problems with digital photos and what they've really experienced is problems with people who haven't resized properly. Thanks again.
- Joan Warburton

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ANSWER 5:
Joan: Please print this note too:
Inkjet photo printers are optimized for using files at 300dpi or at 400dpi, depending on the brand and model.
But extensive testing shows that prints made from an image at 240dpi are gorgeous. (Assuming a high quality image file of course.)You would need a magnifying glass to see any difference.
Use the 240dpi rule of thumb and I doubt you will ever be disappointed.
Regards, Peter Burian
- Peter K. Burian

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ANSWER 6:
Thanks for the info Peter. I get so confused. I have printed to 11x14 with no problem but have never gone any larger that that ... and I don't "offer/advertise" prints larger than that. I just bought this camera, so an 8mp is out of the question ... LOL ... I have very few customers who ever get over an 8 x 10 though ... This was just a question this coach asked me so I thought I'd research and see. ... I guess I'm still confused as to why more dpi in larger images degrades the images. It's just a brain thing on my part. LOL
- Michelle Ross

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ANSWER 7:
Peter, I can't thank you enough. This site is wonderful and I'm so happy to get such clear, concise information. Thank you. Michelle, I've printed out 16x20, and it was beautiful. I'm using Nikon D70 6 mp. From what I'm gathering, though, Paint Shop Pro is resizing my images because they're all listed at 300 dpi when I open them up in that program.
- Joan Warburton

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ANSWER 8:
Michelle: Yes, it is a confusing topic. I hate to tell you how long it took before I finally fully understood it.

Joan: The Nikon D70 produces larger files and images of superlative quality. A compact digital camera (with a much smaller sensor, etc.) cannot match that level of quality.
Paint Shop Pro is not re-sizing the images. They are about 18 megabytes in size. And Paint Shop Pro does not change that.
It may be setting the dpi to 300, but remember, that does not change the actual file size (just the dimensions of the print size that is recommended). No pixels are added.
Of course, you can always change the file size yourself if you want to make huge prints. Then, the file size will change. Because you will be adding pixels, when using RESAMPLE in Photoshop or Elements.
Peter
- Peter K. Burian

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ANSWER 9:
My friend asked me a few more questions on the same topic, and I provided the following answer. No different than what I have been saying but expressed slightly differently.

<<If the camera generates a 14MB file, it's a 14MB file (with the same number of pixels) whether it's set for 72dpi, 180dpi or 300dpi. (It's only the print size dimensions that change. No pixels are added.)
But, if you increase the dpi in Photoshop - with RESAMPLE checked - then you will change file size.
Play around in SIZE in Photoshop with an image, changing the dpi. First with RESAMPLE **not** checked.
Then, with RESAMPLE checked.
That will make the concept clearer.>>>
Peter
- Peter K. Burian

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NEW QUESTION 10: Commercial Photos of Country Club
Recently, I approached a country club with the prospect of taking pictures of their golfers. It turned into me doing a shoot of their course for a revamping of their brochure. I have no clue how much to charge them. I want to make a good profit but also don't want to scare them off. What are the going rates so that I can undercut the mainstream and still be professional about it?
- Sebastian J. Scalora

ANSWER 1:
See if they: 1. are willing to tell you, 2. if they have the information on how much the previous photographer charged. If you're lucky and they do, then maybe go the slightest bit lower than him (or her) so they choose you. If they don't (more than likely) ... umm ... I don't know what to tell you. I haven't a clue how professional this is, because I don't have a clue about business in general, but what if they wrote down what they would like to pay and you wrote down what you think you are worth and then meet in the middle or negotiate. PURELY an idea because I'm a young-en and I really don't know how business works.
.justin.
- Justin D. Goeden

ANSWER 2:
Sebastian,
I think you should charge at a minimum $50 an hour and try for $75, if you can. Now that you are a pro, you should inquire immediately before doing any work for anybody: "what is your budget?" ... if they don't ask for your prices in advance. Usually, if they are not asking what your price is in advance, they think it is going to be real cheap or even free. I have made the mistake more than once and have twice had to settle for barely enough to cover my costs. It is your responsibility to make sure they know your rates, otherwise they can balk at your invoice and say, "forget it", claiming they didn't know it was going to cost so much. Then you wasted time and possibly film. If terms of the shoot aren't in writing, it will rarely hold up in court and in your favor.

If they ask your price, tell them and then ask, "How does that work for your budget?" If they are shocked, then ask what they had in mind. If it was half what you asked for, then offer to do it for that but scale back how much you do. This way you both are compromising - they are paying you less and you are doing a little less work. But you must get the money worked out before you take a picture on every job, or you will get burned at some point.
Charlie
- Charlie Borland

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Model Release for a Parade?
I recently took a lot of photos at my hometown Homecoming Parade. I want to use some of the shots in a portfolio and Web site to show my work. Do I need a release since they were in a public event? Also, are children different than adults, in that I need their parents' permission, or are they granting permission by having their children in the parade as a public event?
- Tracy Turner

ANSWER 1:
Tracy, you have a person in the picture, so you get their permission to use the image. If it is a child, you get the parents' permission.
- Kerby Pfrangle

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ANSWER 2:
I'm pretty sure that you can use it in a portfolio without a model release. But, yes, as Kerby said, you would definitely need a model release to post it on a Web site.
- Brendan Knell

ANSWER 3:
Tracy,
The biggest issue that gets photographers in trouble is the commercial use of an unreleased photo or person(s) or property. They have to prove damages to prevail, and once you have made money, they have a legitimate issue.
Charlie
- Charlie Borland

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ANSWER 4:
Charlie, I have an additional query. Essentially, it would be impossible to get releases of a parade - how would one possibly trace down the people? There could be out-of-town spectators. Aren't you essentially saying no more broad public photos for commercial photographers, even though news photographers have the right? Also, who would sue? How would they find out? It seems like a crazy situation to me. Also, what do you mean by property? If I take a picture of a private house or someone's flowers, do I need a model release?? Egads!!
- David Ziff

ANSWER 5:
Thank you for your response, David ... you asked all the other questions I was wondering about. How is it OK for the newspaper to print the same photo I took, but I'm not allowed to use it without a release? Aren't they making money with it on the front page? Also, the property thing has me puzzled, because I like to take pictures of old abandoned houses and old barns.
- Tracy Turner

ANSWER 6:
For editorial use (newspapers, etc.), you don't need a model release. That is just how the law is written.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 7:
For commercial release and use, you need a model release for people (parents for children). Charlie Borland had mentioned in a previous article/thread about a lawsuit regarding just a hand in a photo, no faces. He had the release, so all was well.
For private property, a release is required for property too.
You can take the pictures, you can't sell them as prints, postcards, calendars, T-shirts, etc., unless you have the release.
I have been shooting classic/custom hot rods lately, and have been getting the property release signed by offering a print. The property release, like any other contract, needs to have something of value to make it legitimate.
Hope this helps.
- Robert Hambley

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ANSWER 8:
In a portfolio presentation, you can show anyone anything at all. If you publish someone's photograph (yes, the Web is publishing), you need to be aware of privacy laws. This is a great place to apply the Golden Rule.
- William Koplitz

ANSWER 9:
Images taken of people in public places: OK, you can't sell it, but how about these contests? I don't normally enter photos of people but last month, I did enter one I had taken behind the crowd of an eruption of Old Faithful. Many many people in the pic. Is it inappropriate to win or even display such photos? BTW, it didn't make it in the contest. Just wondering if I should remove it from my gallery as well? After reading these discussions several times, I'd never try to sell one with so much as a hand in the photo without a release.
- Sharon D

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ANSWER 10:
Hey Gang,
You all have very valid points and questions regarding releases. I am not a lawyer, but have been in the biz of stock for close to 30 years and been threatened many times with legal action. Never lost, though!

The question of "how can they sue me"? I can sue any one of you for any reason, no matter how ridiculous, because our system allows that. My complaint may get tossed, but you spent time and possibly money fighting me. I have been threatened with a lawsuit for one of my Royalty-Free images of a mouth talking into the phone. I hired a model for the shoot, and the accuser was not the model. Once I produced a full-face image of my model, the guy backed off, but I spent time dealing with it. My ex-business partner spent about a thousand dollars on a lawyer battling a guy who said he wasn't 18 years old when he signed the model release for the shoot. My partner proved he was legal age.

If you shoot a crowd at a parade and every person is recognizable and you sell it to a major insurance company who uses it in an ad on a theme of "Americans Stand United and Blaw Blaw Insurance will stand with you", you could very easily hear from several of their lawyers. As Kerry mentions, the newspaper is editorial news and the use of the photo does not endorse a commercial product or service.

I have shot events in my town with lots of people in the scene and sold to the tourism board for publication. This is not news nor commercial use. I have never heard from anyone in the photos published, either.

You can shoot private property from public property, but once you make money, you have entered new territory and a property release is required. Otherwise, you can open the door for more legal action. The owners of the TransAmerica building in San Francisco have successfully sued numerous photographers who have singled out their building and sold the pictures. My understanding is that if you have 3 or more buildings in your image, you have a skyline instead of a building photo. Skylines don't require releases for any building.

Putting your unreleased image in a contest or on your Web site should not be a problem because you have not sold the image. I believe they have to prove damages, and if you weren't paid, then you did not profit from the use of their photo. I don't worry about that stuff, I worry about the higher-profile uses.
Charlie
- Charlie Borland

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ANSWER 11:
Charlie, thanks for the helpful data. Can you address the issue raised by William regarding publishing on the Web in personal Web sites? I thought the rule was one has to profit or seek commercialization before the photo police come knocking on your door. Please, can anyone point me to the relevant code on the Internet so I can verify this data for myself?
- David Ziff

ANSWER 12:
My belief is this ... "If you make money from the photo ... then get a model release". If it sits in your portfolio as a "sample of your work", then you do not need a model release. I believe this applies to publishing on the Web also, providing the photo is not for sale.
- Roy Blinston

ANSWER 13:
David,
I think Roy is right on the mark in his explanation. I have plenty of photos of clients in my course lessons and Web site with no releases and have never had an issue. All I am saying with the photos is I took them, and here is the quality of my work. That's it.
Charlie
- Charlie Borland

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ANSWER 14:
Whew! Roy and Charles, much appreciated!
- David Ziff

ANSWER 15:
Thanks Charlie!!! I have wondered about the contest for a while. I don't normally shoot people, because I don't like to deal with model releases. Wildflowers aren't so picky :D.
- Sharon D

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ANSWER 16:
Thanks to everyone who responded to my question! I have a little better understanding of the ways I can use my photos without getting into trouble. I will start getting releases from now on, when able, just in case I want to sell the picture. Thanks again, everybody!
- Tracy Turner

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