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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, May 09, 2005
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* SPOTLIGHT: New Instructor for New Course! Photojournalism with David Bathgate
* BETTERPHOTO: BetterPhoto Instructor Interview Puts Tony Sweet in the Spotlight!
* BETTERPHOTO: Summer Courses: Enjoy a Season of Learning and Shooting!
* BETTERPHOTO: New Feature at BetterPhoto: Photography Web Logs!
* FEATURED GALLERY: Pictures of Horseback Riding and Rodeo Pictures
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: 20th Century Icon / Unsold Life Saver Turned Photo Filter
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Medical, Science, and Research Stock Photography ... by Charlie Borland
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Slide Show on CD: How to Do It?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Printing Paper: What to Use?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Digital Stand-Alone Storage
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: How to Avoid Glare from Flash on Paintings
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Photoshop CS or Elements?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Pet Photography: Ideas for Backgrounds
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Converting Slides to Digital: How to Do It?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Flash: Dedicated Vs. Non-Dedicated
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Update for Photoshop CS2 & Elements 3.0
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: New Nikon D70s: How It Compares to D70
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Rights of a Model
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: How to Shoot Silhouettes Against a Sunset


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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New Instructor for New Course! Photojournalism with David Bathgate
Whether you travel the world with your camera or simply walk to the end of the street you live on, visual stories lie nearly everywhere. Viewing the world through photojournalistic eyes involves a deeper look to uncover the facts and then present them in an informative and creative way. "Photojournalism: Telling the Story in Pictures" is the exciting new BetterPhoto online course taught by new instructor and expert photojournalist David Bathgate. For all the details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/DAV01.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 211th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

So many great things are happening at BetterPhoto! First off, we welcome our newest online instructor: David Bathgate, who covers stories for the international news and photo agency Corbis. His work has appeared in international publications such as Time-Asia, The London Sunday Times Magazine, Stern and Focus. Check out his "Photojournalism: Telling the Story in Pictures" course at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/DAV01.asp

Our series of BetterPhoto Interviews with Professional Photographers continues with nature photographer, author, and instructor Tony Sweet. This is a captivating interview, and you won't want to miss it. Read it at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/interviews/Photographer-Tony-Sweet-A.asp

We begin the second week of our newest feature - Better Blogs - and it has been a tremendous success. To read these daily photography journals, click on the links at the top of BetterPhoto's home page.

In this issue of SnapShot, BetterPhoto instructor Charlie Borland continues his series of stock photography tips by focusing on medical, science, and research. See This Week's Photo Tip below. Also, don't miss the photo quiz, plus another outstanding collection of questions and answers, including excellent input from instructor Peter Burian.

That's it for now. Have another fun-filled photographic week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
BetterPhoto Instructor Interview Puts Tony Sweet in the Spotlight!
In a fascinating interview, instructor/author Tony Sweet talks about making the transition from photographing in jazz clubs to photographing in nature. In addition, Tony recalls his first photo sale and his first book deal, and shares advice for those wanting to improve their camera skills. In addition, he provides a five key tips for becoming a professional photographer. Check out this interview at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/interviews/Photographer-Tony-Sweet-A.asp


*****
Summer Courses: Enjoy a Season of Learning and Shooting!
Would you like to learn more about exposure, composition, digital photography, photographic field techniques, Photoshop, specialty subjects, or the business of photography? Join us this summer for an inspiring online photo course at BetterPhoto. Let us be your guide ... with our Web classes, you WILL become a better photographer. For details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


*****
New Feature at BetterPhoto: Photography Web Logs!
BetterPhoto's exciting lineup of Web logs (called "blogs") includes "Instructor Insights" (thoughts on photography and the thrilling world of online instruction); "Notes from Team BetterPhoto" (which relates a behind-the-scenes view of BetterPhoto.com by staff members); and "The BetterPhoto Digital Photography Show" (in which BetterPhoto founder Jim Miotke shares his photographic experiences, while also providing sneak peeks into the world behind BetterPhoto.com). Find Better Blogs links on the Home Page, or visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/betterblogs.asp

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FEATURED GALLERY
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Pictures of Horseback Riding and Rodeo Pictures
A tour through the horse images of BetterPhoto members and instructors reveals a creative array of techniques: from silhouettes and portraits to action and humor. Check out our Pictures of Horseback Riding and Rodeo Pictures gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=141

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
One of the most influential figures in photography had a long career, including as a fashion photographer in the 1920s and '30s, and later as director of photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. He also was a brother-in-law of poet Carl Sandburg. Who was he?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member sy miller is:
Edward Steichen (1879-1973)

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Unsold Life Saver Turned Photo Filter - entered by BetterPhoto member Josh Hudson

Some inventors are famous for one or two of their creations, but often not the inventions they are most proud of. This inventor quit Harvard University when he was 19 years old to invent his first of hundreds of patented inventions. This invention was a safety feature to be used on automobiles to save drivers from headlight glare. It was not picked up by car manufacturers, but it has been used by photographers all over the world as a filter to remove glare from unwanted reflected light. Who is this inventor?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Medical, Science, and Research Stock Photography ... by Charlie Borland
Are you interested in shooting medical, science, and research stock photography? There is money to be made here. But getting access to a hospital or high-tech clean room is difficult and often impossible. The next approach would be to create the illusion that you are in one of these facilities or shoot it as a conceptual image. An example could be a laboratory and a person in a lab coat, rubber gloves, and working with test tubes. This could be shot in your garage. Another example is a person dressed like a doctor with a stethoscope and chart, photographed against a background. With access to real facilities difficult, you need to create the illusion that your photo was taken in a real location.

Check out Charlie Borland's online courses:



Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
  • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
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You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Slide Show on CD: How to Do It?
Hi! I'm looking to put some pictures on a CD so I can show them to people - or anything else that comes up. But I don't just want to put a bunch of pictures on a CD and force somebody to click on them or open them specially. Is there some way or program that I can use to combine photos into a slide show that will autoplay on a PC? Thanks!
- Andrew Laverghetta

See Andrew's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
I use Pinnacle Studio, which allows you to customize your slide show to do whatever you want. You can force it to start automatically or come up with a menu with chapters. You can also add music, and it has great transitions you can add between photos. You can either burn them to CD or DVD. But there are several programs that you can use, like Roxio, Adobe Photoshop Album, etc. ... I like Pinnacle because you can customize everything the way you want. Have fun.
- Mike A. Cocita

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16087

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=16087

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*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Printing Paper: What to Use?
Hi. I want to know what is the best paper for printing digital images. I'm looking for something like wedding shots in matte paper. I don't like glossy prints. Thanks.
- Rafael Navarro

ANSWER 1:
The "best" paper is that which serves your needs and desires. No one else can decide that for you but YOU. You've already defined your desire for matte paper (and a good choice for weddings). Buy some small packages from major brands and experiment. I would first try those matte papers that are made by whoever made your printer.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net
- Michael H. Cothran

See Michael's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Pictorico. May have to buy it online.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Every printer manufacturer recommends its own paper. While these may be OK, you're best advised to shop around.
A friend actually raves about the paper available at Staples; I've never tried it.
Adorama, Inc. offers its private label and offers sample packs for about $10. This is a really good option.
Kodak paper, especially Ultima, is good. But, you may be limited in size. At one point, they offered a legal-size glossy than enabled me to print an 8X12. I may have the last remaining 30 sheets in captivity. I love their matte finish (called Satin) when I try to make a B&W print. Check out Sam's Club for great prices.
Ilford is my paper of choice. I use the Galleria Pearl and try to stay away from high-gloss selections. Go to the Ilford Web site for descriptions of the available paper. It's available through all the major advertisers in photo magazines, Utrecht Art Supply Stores, etc.
I have a Canon S-800 printer; it's old, but I love it. Canon Photo-Pro Paper gives great results (hi-gloss) - but, to date, Canon doesn't offer a matte paper. And, I don't like Canon's standard glossy - it's too lightweight. I've used and hated HP paper; however, only HP provides a paper that you can print a picture on the "good side" and a calendar matrix (that you can write on in pencil or ball point pen) on the reverse side.
As Michael says, only you can decide the correct paper for YOU.
- John Sandstedt

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16076

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=16076

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NEW QUESTION 3: Digital Stand-Alone Storage
I am taking a trip to Europe and do not want to bring my laptop. Has anyone used a stand-alone storage device or portable CD burner - and, if so, can you give me some advice and options? I've recently looked at the Jobo any thoughts??
- ~ Denelli~

See ~'s Premium BetterPholio™

Visit ImagesbyDenelli.com - ~'s Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
I have a Micro Solutions RoadStor portable CD burner. While I have not actually taken it on a trip yet, I have been doing some testing with it. It is reliable with backups that will fit on a single CD, but I have had mixed results with backups that would require multiple CDs. An additional plus for the RoadStor is that it is also a portable DVD player. If you buy a stand-alone hard drive, make sure you buy one with enough capacity for your trip. Also, whatever device you do decide to buy, make sure you test it before your trip and while it is still under warranty.
- Matthew Slyfield

ANSWER 2:
I don't know exactly what facilities are readily available in Europe, but I expect you should have no problem finding a place (like Wal-Mart or Walgreens here in the USA) to burn the contents of your memory card to a CD. That solution would likely be the least expensive and also require the least bulk in packing. Have fun and share your photos when you get home.
- John R. Rhodes

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16075

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=16075

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: How to Avoid Glare from Flash on Paintings
I am having problems photographing byzantine icons. These are either framed in glass or not, and they have golden or silver areas. As I cannot move them from their place (they are hanged in churches and some of them are 2m high and 1m wide), the natural light is not enough, so I use a diffuser and a flash to light them but there appear areas that are more lighted than others. Any idea how to get rid of them during the photographing? Which is the proper arrangement of the equipment (diffuser etc.)? I use a digital SLR.
- Dimitris

ANSWER 1:
I would perhaps suggest:
-Use a tripod
-Turn off the flash
-Set your camera on an aperture priority mode so that it'll set a longer shutter speed to expose for natural light.
That's about all that might help, other than setting up a large extra light (don't think churches would go for that).
- Laura Roth

ANSWER 2:
Greetings Dimitris: I photograph a lot of artwork for reproduction in books and catalogs - mostly paintings, both oil and watercolor. I'll offer the whole technique; then you can pick and choose what aspect, if any, you want to try.
To do this right, you first need the painting at camera level, set on an easel or some kind of table that you can make plumb, square and level to the camera lens. Likewise, the camera has to be square, plumb and level to the painting. A view camera works best for this, although I've pulled it off using 35mm and medium formats as well. A tripod, as Laura mentioned, is pretty much mandatory, as is a lens hood or lens shade. A tape measure, or some kind of laser-measuring device for checking distances, is handy to have too.
Your lighting has to be balanced, and equal. Remember that angle of incidence is equal to angle of reflection. I usually use two studio lights of 1000 w/s each, having UV coated flash tubes or UV filter on your lens. Organic pigments used in oil colors tend to fluoresce under UV light, and that fluorescence causes parts of the painting to appear as though they're glowing and color shift.
The lights are positioned at 45 degrees to either side of the camera, set equal distance from the centerline of the picture.
Using a diffuser isn't much help, because all that does is soften the light output. If it's not set at a proper angle to the work, you'll still see hot spots or glare, or some areas of the painting may be washed out. And to avoid that you need balanced lighting anyway, from two sources.
If either your lights aren't set correctly, (and doing this well with an on camera flash is nearly impossible) or if your picture is out of square to the camera, then chances are you'll see some kind of glare or unwanted reflection in the final image. If the painting is framed in glass, it's still doable but much trickier. Most of the time, I have the gallery or artist remove the glass. Even a polarizing filter isn't much help photographing art work because the colors or contrast are inaccurate.
Also, in at least one frame of each painting, I attach a color card and Kodak gray scale card to the tops of the frame to help the printer match the color or find the right contrast for reproduction.
In situations where you can't move the painting, then you need to go to it. In a church, that may involve using something like a rolling scaffold with lights clamped to either side of the support rail. We did that recently for a series of churches in New Jersey. It also included shooting all the stained glass for Dow Corning. YIKES!!! Compared to that, the paintings were a piece of cake. It's all about knowing how to use, what type to use, how much to use, and how to control your lighting.
Take it errrr ... light ;>)

- Mark Feldstein

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16063

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=16063

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Photoshop CS or Elements?
I use a film camera and take a lot of nature shots and street shots. I want to make minor adjustments and convert to B&W and remove flaws and things like that. Would Elements suffice or should I consider banging out the money for CS? I hear CS2 is close to being released too ...
- Jesse Plummer

ANSWER 1:
Jesse: CS2 has been released but is very expensive. I believe that 90 percent of photo enthusiasts would be happy with Elements 3.0. You can do everything you want to with this affordable program.

The question is how to do it. It's not a simplistic program. That's why you find a lot of books about using Elements 3.0.
- Peter K. Burian

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Visit Peter Burian's Web Site - www.peterkburian.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Peter Burian:
Digital Photography with Guest Instructor Peter Burian

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16059

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=16059

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Pet Photography: Ideas for Backgrounds
A friend of mine wants me to take some pictures of her two doggies. Does anyone have any good ideas of places to take them, like the park, etc.?
- Teresa K. Canady

ANSWER 1:
Teresa,
Taking them to a strange environment might be too distracting to them if they haven't been to the park frequently, or have not become accustomed to visiting new environments. Some parks and other public spaces ban dogs, even on leash. If you decide to try it, check that out first.
The best photographs I have of our dogs and cats were done at home. I observed their behaviors, what triggered them, and where they naturally perched or traveled around the house and yard. I then set up conditions (and cleaned up any clutter) around their favorite "spots" and looked for pleasing compositions in those locations. Dogs and cats typically have favored "perches" from which they can watch things outdoors and the window lighting during the day can be pleasing if a good perspective of them is possible in that location.
Knowing what usually triggered certain behaviors allowed setting up conditions for them while I "lay in wait" to make the photographs. Even so, it requires patience. In general, dogs and especially cats cannot be posed unless they've been extremely well trained and obey commands without "breaking" from them. Pets that are disciplined are the exception, not the rule.
- John A. Lind

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16039

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=16039

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Converting Slides to Digital: How to Do It?
What is the best way to transfer slides to digital format?
- Mike Carpenter

See Mike's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
There's really only ONE way: Have them scanned (or scan them yourself). The higher the scanning resolution the better.
OK ... maybe there's another way, but I certainly would NOT recommend it: Copy (take pictures of) your slides with a digital camera that can shoot 1:1.

Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net
- Michael H. Cothran

See Michael's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
I agree with Michael. The scanner should be a true slide scanner ... not an adapted flatbed ... or a drum scanner if you're willing to go the very high cost of having a drum scan done by a professional lab. Drum scans are typically reserved for large fine art prints that will be periodically printed on demand by a lab.
I've never had a need for a drum scan, but have had numerous slides scanned by a pro lab and have always had them done at highest resolution on their film scanner. CDs are cheap, and it can always be down-sized to what's needed for publication or web use. Haven't encountered the need for drum scans (yet) and still have all the occasional large Ilfochrome prints made directly from the slide.
- John A. Lind

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16032

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=16032

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: Flash: Dedicated Vs. Non-Dedicated
What is the difference between a dedicated flash and a non-dedicated flash?
- Laura Watts

ANSWER 1:
In simple terms, a dedicated flash talks to your camera and listens to it. Depending on your flash and your camera, a dedicated flash may set the camera at flash sync, read the light off the film plane and shut itself off when enough light reached the film plane, set the aperture in program mode and even assist your autofocus.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 2:
A dedicated flash will work with only one brand or line of cameras. It will have several contacts around the large central one in the hotshoe connection. The location and electronic communication protocol varies by camera brand so for example a Nikon-dedicated flash will not work on a Minolta. Sometimes the dedication is very specific - such as the Canon digital EOS cameras can only use flashes with Canon's E-TTL dedication. They cannot use flashes dedicated to Canon's traditional TTL or A-TTL.
A non-dedicated flash has just the one large central contact in the hotshoe, or connects to the camera via the standarized PC sync cord. The only communication between the camera and flash is shorting that connection to make it fire. Using a non-dedicated flash you have to manually set the lens aperture and shutter speed.
- Jon Close

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16024

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*****


NEW QUESTION 9: Update for Photoshop CS2 & Elements 3.0
Good news for those who own Photoshop CS2 or Elements 3.0 and shoot with a digital camera's RAW format.

"Camera Raw 3.1 posted on Adobe FTP server RAW file support for the Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT/350D and Nikon D2X" (and other improvements.)http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/index.asp
NOTE: Be sure to do the installation properly. You must remove the old Camera Raw.bi plug-in first. From Common Files AND from Program Files ... CS2 only ... Plug-ins ... File Formats. (AND same for Elements 3.0) Save the old plug-in in another folder, in case you ever need it again.

Then, install the new plug-in in both folders (in CS2 and/or Elements 3.0).

And yes, it works well with Elements 3.0 as well, although Adobe does not say so ... i.e., I can use it to open and convert CR2 files from the Rebel XT. Naturally, ACR in Elements 3.0 has fewer features than in CS2, but the new plug-in supports those features perfectly.
- Peter K. Burian

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Visit Peter Burian's Web Site - www.peterkburian.com

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Digital Photography with Guest Instructor Peter Burian

ANSWER 1:
Hi Peter,
Thanks for this information. I have downloaded what was on that Web site, but I have no idea how to get it from my camera to my computer. I have a digi-Rebel XT Canon and I have been unsuccessful at getting my RAW pictures off of the camera and onto the computer. Could you step me through this? Thanks.
- Cynthia L. Wanyonyi

ANSWER 2:
Cynthia: You could install the Canon software that came with your camera on a CD. That is quite easy and will allow you to open, adjust and convert RAW files (from the CR2 format to TIFF.)
The Adobe RAW update works only with Photoshop CS2 and Elements Elements 3.0
It's important to do the installation properly, with CS2 or Elements 3.0, as described in http://www.adobe.com/special/photoshop/pdfs/CR_31_readme.pdf

Cheers! Peter Burian

- Peter K. Burian

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Visit Peter Burian's Web Site - www.peterkburian.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Peter Burian:
Digital Photography with Guest Instructor Peter Burian

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=16023

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=16023

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*****


NEW QUESTION 10: New Nikon D70s: How It Compares to D70
I have begun testing Nikon's new D70s. Is it much better than the D70? Here are some specifics about the D70s AND info on upgrading your D70.

Only 5 grams heavier, the D70s features a larger 2” LCD monitor (vs. 1.8”) for better scrutiny of images, while newly designed menus and slightly different controls offer greater convenience.

Built-in flash coverage has been increased to support lenses as wide as 18mm and PictBridge technology has been added. The latter allows for direct printing from the camera with any PictBridge compliant photo printer.

A new socket has been added for a basic ($30, street price) Remote Cord (MC-DC1), but the D70s also accepts the other Nikon remote control accessories. Do note that the MS-D70 battery holder - for using CR2 lithium batteries instead of the new (higher capacity) EN-EL3a battery - is now an optional ($15) extra.

And finally, autofocus performance has been tweaked. The 5-area AF system continues to feature a cross-type sensor in the center, broad frame coverage, and reliable low light detection. The improvement was to the continuous AF system, for greater precision with fast, more consistent subject acquisition and improved focus tracking.

Note: There’s some good news for photographers who already own a Nikon D70. You can upgrade the camera with the superior autofocus, improved menu design and PictBridge compatibility, free of charge. Simply visit the Nikon Web site in late May and look for the new D70 Firmware. Download that data file to a computer and load it to your camera as per the instructions, a simple ten-minute process.

The Nikon digital Web site is: www.nikondigital.com
- Peter K. Burian

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Visit Peter Burian's Web Site - www.peterkburian.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Peter Burian:
Digital Photography with Guest Instructor Peter Burian

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NEW QUESTION 11: Rights of a Model
A few weeks ago, I won a competition where I get to be a model for a day. The prize is worth €150, and part of that prize is that I get to look at my photos and purchase them if I want. What I really want to know is what are my rights? I know as a photographer you don't have to get people to sign a model release form if the photo is on the street, but in a studio setting - if my cousin and I don't purchase these photos - what happens to them? What are our rights?
- Katherine O'Connor

ANSWER 1:
Anytime you are taking a photo for commentary, editorial use, or education, you are fairly safe with shooting. However, there needs to be the added issue of whether or not the subject has an expectation of privacy. That is, just because you want to shoot a photo for a news story about, for example, "Peeping Toms," that doesn't mean you can go photograph someone in their house without their permission.
In most cases, people have an expectation of privacy. They have the rights to their image and how it is used - even if it is from a street photo. You always run that risk ... especially if you plan on earning money from the photo.
You will more than likely be asked to sign a model release before any photos are shot. There would be very little point by do a prize giveaway if you didn't agree to allow them to market the images. ESPECIALLY if you decide not to buy any pics.
It sounds like this studio is using the "prize" as a marketing ploy to get you to do a free sitting and hope that you buy some images later.
- Josh Hudson

See Josh's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
As to what happens to them, if you and the pictures are good looking enough, they'll use them to promote the next time they hold the contest. If not, they'll delete/throw them out.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=15966

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CONTINUING QUESTION 1: How to Shoot Silhouettes Against a Sunset
I want to take a picture of a person all black in the foreground and a colored sunset in the background. Would I need different equipment for that? I have a Nikon SLR 70.
- Amy Grindell

ANSWER 1:
Simply meter off the background to the left or right of the sun (preferably a blue portion of the sky), and shoot at that setting. Everything in the foreground will silhouette.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
In addition to what Bob said, make sure you do not use the flash while shooting the silhouette. Your camera may also inadvertently pop up the flash in certain exposure modes. You have to safeguard against that.
-- dev.
- Dev Mukherjee

ANSWER 3:
Hi Bob,
The silhouette attempts I've done, the foreground wasn't quite totally silhouetted ... should I close my lens down by 1 stop to better ensure a complete silhouette?
Thanks.
- Carrie Mai

See Carrie's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
I was going to suggest that you shoot a couple of extra shots, at 1 and 2 stops overexposure. Make sure your lab doesn't try to correct for the foreground too.
- Kerry L. Walker

ANSWER 5:
Carrie,
To insure that your foreground subjects will silhouette, there needs to be at least 3 or 4 stops difference between your subject and the brighter background. (Having your subjects wear dark clothing makes this easier to accomplish.) As Kerry W. mentioned, bracketing is always wise. Just be sure to use the meter reading off the SKY (not the subject) as your starting point.

This link will show an example using this process:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=326042

- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 6:
You can also add a colored filter for a more dramatic effect. Any color will work, depending on the effect you want. I use orange and cyan filters. Orange has a warmer look, and the cyan one (bluish) has a colder look.
- Maria Melnyk

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=15920

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=15920

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