BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, December 13, 2004
~~~~~~~~~~~

* SPOTLIGHT: BetterPhoto's School: Enjoy a Season of Learning and Shooting!
* BETTERPHOTO: BetterPhoto's Top Ten List ... Holiday Shooting Tips!
* BETTERPHOTO: The Joy of Digital Photography with Jeff Wignall
* BETTERPHOTO: Holiday Shopping Ideas: How About a Photo Course or Deluxe BetterPholio™?
* FEATURED GALLERY: Focus on Framing the Subject
* FEATURED PLACE: Focus on Yellowstone National Park
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: On the Lookout / Shooting Script
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Stock Photography Concepts... By Charlie Borland
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: When to Use Different Photo Papers?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Crop Factor for Digital Cameras
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Fisheye Lens Composition Tips
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: What Else to Buy for a Beginner
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Light Meter Readings
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Studio Flash Units and Canon Elan
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Flash Synch
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 3: Filters for Indoor Studio Work
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 4: Photographing Paintings
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 5: Studio Lighting Setup
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 6: Circular Polarizer: Wide-Angle Slim Mount
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 7: How to Shoot Silhouettes Against a Sunset
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 8: Saving Negatives to CD.
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 9: How to Set Proper Exposure
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 10: Effect of Polarizing Filter


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

BetterPhoto's School: Enjoy a Season of Learning and Shooting!
Would you like to learn more about photography? Are you struggling to gain a better understanding of the principles of composition, exposure, photographic field techniques, digital photography, or Photoshop?

Join us for an inspiring online photo course at BetterPhoto.com. Let us be your guide ... with our online courses, you WILL become a better photographer. Our winter school session begins January 5th and promises to fill those excellent weeks with creativity and inspiration.

For more information and a complete listing of the latest online classes being offered, go to our course categories page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to the 190th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

This holiday season has been filled with excitement at BetterPhoto! Signups for our winter online photo courses are well under way, and our schedule has never been better. Stop by our courses page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp

In this issue of SnapShot, we have lots to share, beginning with our Top Ten list of holiday shooting tips and continuing with yet more excellent advice from stock photography expert and instructor Charlie Borland; see his photo tip below. Speaking of this special season, you can also buy that special someone a BetterPhoto gift certificate for an online course, a Deluxe BetterPholio™, or a Premium BetterPholio™. For details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gifts.asp

Also, noted photographer and author Jeff Wignall has joined BetterPhoto's outstanding team of instructors with a fantastic new online course, The Joy of Digital Photography. Read about it below, or go directly to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JEF01.asp

And, as usual, this week's questions and answers are jam-packed with wonderful tips and information.

That's it for now. Have fun shooting during this wonderful, photo-rich holiday season!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
BetterPhoto's Top Ten List ... Holiday Shooting Tips!
The holidays make for fantastic photo opportunities. Even the least photographically-inclined reach for a camera to do the annual group portrait. That's why we compiled the "Top Ten Tips for Better Holiday Photography"! Use these tips to make great photos of Christmas, Hanukkah, or the mid-winter holiday of your preference. This year, you'll come away from the holidays with the absolute best photographs you have ever created. Check them out at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/topten/holiday-photography-tips.asp


*****
The Joy of Digital Photography with Jeff Wignall
So much is written about technology and equipment that we often overlook the best part of digital photography: taking beautiful pictures. And that's why we are thrilled to offer Jeff Wignall's terrific new online course: The Joy of Digital Photography. Patterned after his excellent book of the same name, Jeff's 8-week class will provide a good grounding in basic camera settings and camera controls, but the emphasis will be on creating images that are fun, colorful, and downright pretty. For information:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JEF01.asp


*****
Holiday Shopping Ideas: How About a Photo Course or Deluxe BetterPholio™?
BetterPhoto online photo courses, Premium BetterPholios™, and Deluxe BetterPholios™ are all FANTASTIC gift ideas! We have an easy way for you to give a meaningful and lasting gift to that special photographer in your life. A beautiful certificate will be mailed to you in a very special presentation. And we can even help you keep it a secret! To learn more, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gifts.asp

Of course, books or DVDs by our outstanding instructors also make superb holiday gifts. Our online store showcases the fantastic books and DVDs from our staff of BetterPhoto instructors. And, for December, we put the spotlight on Kerry Drager's awesome "Scenic Photography 101: A Crash Course in Shooting Better Pictures Outdoors" as Book of the Month! For details on all BetterPhoto books and DVDs, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/store.asp

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FEATURED GALLERY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Focus on Framing the Subject
Compositional framing come in all shapes and sizes, as shown by BetterPhoto.com members. Some frames surround an entire background subject, while others are partial ones: i.e., side, bottom, or top. Examples of framing devices include windows, doors, sculptures, fences, overhanging tree branches, arches, fountains, flowers, architectural elements, a companion's outstretched arm, or even a nearby hot-air balloon in a colorful race. Check out BetterPhoto's gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=980

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FEATURED PLACE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Focus on Yellowstone National Park
One of America's most celebrated parks is also one of the country's most celebrated photographic spots. Beyond the rising steam of the area's famous geysers, Yellowstone also features grand wildlife, lakes, rivers, and other attractions. BetterPhoto instructors and members have the photos to prove that the park is a year-round photographic attraction! See this gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=414

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Last week, we asked:
In which movie does an injured photographer get into the habit of spying on his neighbors?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member joy is:
"Rear Window" ...

  • Editor's note: This 1954 Alfred Hitchcock classic starred James Stewart as a wheelchair-bound photographer (broken leg); Grace Kelly appeared as his girlfriend. A 1998 TV remake starred Christopher Reeve, who played a paralyzed architect.

    To see all answers to this question, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

    And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Shooting Script - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

    In which movie was Julia Roberts a professional photographer?

    Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Stock Photography Concepts... By Charlie Borland
    Successful stock photos are often successful because they illustrate a concept. It is not uncommon for a client to be looking for a stock image that says a specific concept. Some sample concepts that are popular are: Teamwork, Success, Competition, Family, Happiness, Pride, Performance, Quality, Reliability, Trust, Work, etc. A good stock photo that says Teamwork might be a tug-o-war. A mountain climber on top of a mountain says Success. The most successful stock photographers apply concepts to the images they shoot.

    Take Charlie Borland's online courses:



    Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

    Add Your Own Tip:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
    My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
    • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
    • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
    • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
    You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

    BetterPhoto.com
    P.O. Box 2781
    Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

    To order online, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    NEW QUESTION 1: When to Use Different Photo Papers?
    I am curious to know for what different applications I would use a glossy, semi-gloss, matte, or satin photo paper. Is it just personal preference and I should print on each one to see what I like best? Thanks in advance for the info.
    - Brian McDonald

    ANSWER 1:
    This question has been around since I started in the photo processing business in the '70s. It is really just a matter of personal preferance. It seems like amateur stuff goes glossy and pro stuff goes matte, but it's not written in stone. In general, amateurs want over-saturation and high contrast and high sharpness, which glossy can give the perception of. Pros want lower saturation, contrast, and sharpness; more neutral for better skin tones. But this is all just a generalization.
    Vince
    www.PhotoAgo.com
    - Vince Broesch

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13098

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13098

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 2: Crop Factor for Digital Cameras
    I've heard that the zoom range of the same lens on a digital camera is some multiplier (1.6?) times the zoom range on a 35mm camera. First, is the 1.6 multiplier correct? If so, does this mean that if I have a zoom lens that's advertised as 28 - 200 mm, it is 28 - 200 mm on a 35 mm camera, and 45 (approx) to 320 mm on a digital camera?
    - Robert Murray

    ANSWER 1:
    It is more accurately called a "crop factor." The digital sensor of most digital SLRs is smaller than the 35mm film frame, but they use the same lenses. The actual focal length of the lens, and its other properties (aperture, focus distance, macro reproduction ration, depth of field) are not changed, but the smaller digital sensor effectively captures a cropped image from the center of the lens's image circle. Thus the angle of view captured is smaller, and is comparable to the view in a 35mm camera with a lens with 1.3x (EOS 1D), 1.5x (Nikon DSLRs), or 1.6x (EOS Digital Rebel, 10D, 20D) longer focal length.

    A 28-200 zoom on a Canon 20D is still a 28mm-200mm lens, but the sensor gives an angle of view comparable to what one would have with a 35mm camera 45mm-320mm zoom.
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 2:
    And, on a Nikon D70 the 28 - 200 would effectively be a 42 - 300.
    Thanks, Jon.
    - Robert Murray

    ANSWER 3:
    One more question: With the Nikon D70, and a 28 - 200 mm lens, what will I see in the view finder, the 28 - 200 mm image or the 42 - 300 mm image that the camera will capture?
    - Robert Murray

    ANSWER 4:
    The DSLR viewfinders show the image that the sensor will capture.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13092

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13092

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 3: Fisheye Lens Composition Tips
    Can anyone offer some tips for good composition when using fisheye-type lens (16mm)? I want to learn how to avoid obvious distortion. Thanks.
    - Paul D. Carter

    ANSWER 1:
    If you want to avoid distortion, avoid a fisheye lens.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    To add to Greg's response, image distortion is a part of the allure of fisheye lenses. Exaggerated foreground features, curved horizons, etc., are why people choose these particular lenses for a given situation.
    The only tip I can offer is to check your composition carefully to make sure the front of your shoes aren't in the frame ....as will sometimes happen when extreme W/A lenses are used.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13085

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13085

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 4: What Else to Buy for a Beginner
    I will be purchasing my first SLR camera this spring (Canon T2). I'd like to know what else I should buy to enhance photos or make it easier to shoot pictures. This is a new hobby of mine and am looking forward to learning as much as I can. We have a trip planned for the Caribbean and would love to bring home some lovely photos. Any other advice or opinions are appreciated. Also ... if someone has a 28-80mm lens, why do I see questions if someone should buy a 50mm lens? Thanks for any input!!!!
    - Eva M. Loretta

    ANSWER 1:
    Flash and maybe a tripod if you want to get pictures of yourself or sunsets while you're down there. There's no real need to go much farther than that. A 50mm is a good start, because:
    1) A fixed focal length makes you get more involved in getting the picture you want. It's easy to get locked in to being too shy about moving closer, changing positions and being seen taking a picture.
    2) A focal length of 50mm is close to the perspective of how your eyes see things. So it helps to learn when what you first see is close to what the picture comes out as.
    3) They are usually clear and sharp for optics, and their biggest aperture is very wide for low light stuff.
    4) Price ... usually very inexpensive, but still high-quality.
    Since you already have a 28-80, no point in getting a 50mm. I think a 50mm is the most underrated for portraits. Most are locked into the small telephoto for portraits, but a 50mm feels more intimate and has more flavor.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13083

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13083

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 5: Light Meter Readings
    When using a light meter, I find I get a different reading when taking a reflective reading than when taking a incident reading. Most of the time the incident reading requires 1 stop more exposure. Is this normal for comparing these two readings?
    - Marty

    ANSWER 1:
    Different readings, yep. How many f/stops difference depends on the color/reflectivity.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    If your hand-held meter reading requires a stop more exposure than the reflected light meter recommends (in the same light), it's because the (reflected) metered object is a stop brighter than neutral gray.
    As Greg pointed out, the metered object reflects more light back into your lens and onto the film (or sensor), and can give you a false reading. (This is similar to metering white snow, which can be TWO stops off.)
    In this scenario, your incident reading will be the most accurate. You will find that a gray card placed at the same location, and in the same light, will yield similar exposure recommendations.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13081

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13081

    back to top

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Studio Flash Units and Canon Elan
    I'm very confused. I own 3 White Lightning Ultra ZAP UZ800 self-contained studio flash units that produce "330 true watt seconds and 800 effective watt seconds of power, with 14,000 lumen seconds of output". See http://www.white-lightning.com/uz800.html.
    I would like to use them with my Canon Elan 7e. However, I understand that I need a sync cord adapter that fits in the hot shoe. Perhaps I'm missing something in the terminology here. Is the sync cord adapter the same as the ST-E2 Transmitter? Does the ST-E2 have a sync terminal onto which I can attach the sync cords from the White Lightnings?
    Also, I can measure the ratio of the White Lightning through my flash meter. But, how will I know if the Elan has the same reading? Would this need to be in manual mode?
    One afterthought: Are these small White Lightnings too powerful for the Canon Elan 7e?
    Thanking you in advance, and have a happy holiday.
    Bunny Snow
    - Susan K. Snow

    ANSWER 1:
    Bunny-
    You do need a sync cord adapter for your hot shoe to fire your WL strobes. The ST-E2 is intended as an Infra Red triggering device that fires, as far as I know, only three models of Canon Speedlights, but not your WLs. I have not used an ST-E2, so I do not know if it has a plug for inserting your WL PC cord to fire those strobes, but I doubt it does, because it is not intended for use that way. If it did have a PC sync socket, you would clearly see it.

    What you can get is a PC adapter for your hot shoe, such as Safe Sync, and Canon makes something also. Or you can move up to a Radio Slave like Quantum, Pocket Wizard, and others, and then you are not running a wire between camera and strobe. Your other question about measuring the strobes: the WL are not E-TTL like the Canon Speedlights are, so the Canon camera doesn't recognize anything. So everything becomes manual. You set your camera to manual, pick the appropriate shutter speed for the scene, measure the ratios between your strobes, and set the camera for the recommended f/stop.
    - Charlie Borland

    See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - borlandphoto.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
    Lighting for Commercial Photography
    Stock Photography

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13070

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13070

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Flash Synch
    Can you explain the flash synch rating?
    - Johnda Cantrell

    ANSWER 1:
    A camera's flash sync is the fastest shutter speed allowable, when using flash as the primary source of illumination.
    Typically, with film cameras, this "sync speed" ranges somewhere between 1/90 and 1/250 second. What this means is that the shutter is open the entire time that the flash burst occurs. Obviously, the faster sync speeds are the most effective for freezing fast action.
    If you were to select a shutter speed faster than your camera's flash sync capabilities, the result would be that a portion (or all) of the frame would under-expose ... or black out.
    You can, of course, shoot with flash at any slower speed, up to the sync speed but some motion of the action will be evident on the film, as ambient light will capture whatever movement occurs before (or after) the flash fires.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13060

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13060

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 3: Filters for Indoor Studio Work
    I am interested in knowing more about filters. I shoot mostly macro photography, indoors with halogen lamps. I use a polarizing filter to shoot outdoors with landscapes etc.
    I would like to know if there are filters I should be looking into that deal with indoor studio photography. Both people and macros. Thank you
    - Sarah B. Whiles

    See Sarah 's Premium BetterPholio™

    Visit SarahWhiles.com - Sarah 's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    Try a blue corrective filter, (80-A for quartz halogens). If you shoot digital, you can select a "tungsten" setting.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13056

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13056

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 4: Photographing Paintings
    Someone has asked me to shoot some of their paintings. He has expressed interest in both slides as well as having the images scanned to a CD for e-mailing, etc. I was hoping to shoot at various settings, view the results before taking it further. Can the lab folks scan from slide film?
    - Denis

    ANSWER 1:
    Yes, slides can scan well. Shoot the paintings with a fine-grain slide film (bracketing your exposure settings), and send only the best in to the lab to be scanned.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13044

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13044

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 5: Studio Lighting Setup
    I have a studio lighting set-up I received for last year for Christmas. But I am not having much luck with it. It had NO instructions on set-up. When I do use it, all the objects are washed out. I've tried to use the 3 lights in different ways - i.e., only use 1 or 2 of the 3. But they are still washed out. How can I set them up to not make everyone sooo pale?
    - Brandy Perry

    ANSWER 1:
    Brandy-
    If they are washed out, it is because they are over exposed, also known as over lit. Turn the power down on the lights or change your f/stop to a smaller aperture to allow less light in exposing your photo.
    - Charlie Borland

    See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Charlie Borland's Web Site - borlandphoto.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
    Lighting for Commercial Photography
    Stock Photography

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13031

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13031

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 6: Circular Polarizer: Wide-Angle Slim Mount
    I have a Canon Zoom Wide Angle-Telephoto EF 28135 mm f/3.5-5.6 Image Stabilizer USM Auto focus Lens, and am contemplating a B+W circular polarized multi-coated glass filter.
    I have recently learned that this company also makes a Circular Polarizer Wide-Angle Slim Mount Coated Glass Filter. Please explain and, if possible, illustrate the reason of choosing one over the other, other than the price.
    I understand that the latter is for wide-angle lenses, but is there a difference when that wide angle is part of a zoom? Thanking you in advance.
    - Susan K. Snow

    ANSWER 1:
    I have the same lens, and, at first, I used the regular polarizer. At the widest end at 28mm, I can notice the four corners of the photos are much darker, but no vignetting (totally black corners). I switched to the slim version, and the dark corners were gone. If not at the widest end of the zoom, either version is fine. However, since the slim version has no front thread, you cannot put another filter on top (who would, anyway), and you cannot even use your lens cap. It came with a push-on cap, but it is so easy to get loose and fall off. I ended up getting a lens-cap saver - the thing that has one end glue to the lens cap and the other end is the elastic band that you put around the lens. Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13017

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13017

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 7: How to Shoot Silhouettes Against a Sunset
    How do I adjust the shutter speed to capture action and still get enough light to see images?
    - Willard a. Hutt

    ANSWER 1:
    Your shutter speed will depend upon what type of action you are attempting to capture (i.e., someone walking, someone running, birds flying, etc.). If you are looking to freeze action, something around 1/250 second or faster should cover most scenarios.
    To "get enough light", set your shutter to 1/250 and meter off a blue portion of the distant sky (without the sun in the frame), and set your aperture to the recommended setting for that meter reading.
    This setting will show your silhouettes against a natural-looking background, and freeze the action of the silhouettes in the foreground.
    Note: your depth of field may be shallow with a slow film or low ISO setting.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13016

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13016

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 8: Saving Negatives to CD.
    Recently I have been having my 35mm negatives processed, and then I scan and transfer them to CDs after some Photoshop work. This is rather inexpensive, but time-consuming.
    My question is this: If the lab puts the negative directly on CD for me, is the resolution satisfactory to enlarge, and manipulate in Photoshop and resave to another disk or file?
    My prints are generally no larger than 8X10, but sometimes I do high-res. scans so I can enlarge areas of a photo and crop them without loosing to much clarity. Thanks for any input!
    - Jay Linski

    ANSWER 1:
    Yes.
    - Jerry Frazier

    ANSWER 2:
    "My question is this: If the lab puts the negative directly on CD for me, is the resolution satisfactory to enlarge, and manipulate in Photoshop and resave to another disk or file?"

    Maybe. Depends on your final use (email, Web, newsletter, print 4x6 or 8x12, etc.), and the level of the scan done by the lab. Many labs do low-res scans (about 50kb .jpg files) that are not suitable for other than emailing. Higher-res scans may be available as an extra cost optional service.
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 3:
    I will check with my pro lab to see what resolution they would use.
    I will be using the photos for Web viewing,(lower res.), but need them for quality, if printed, (higher resolution) after they have been through Photoshop.
    Thanks.
    - Jay Linski

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=13011

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=13011

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 9: How to Set Proper Exposure
    I was told that when making enlargements from "slides," the final print will be slightly darker - as a general rule. Is that true? When shooting portraits using slide film (e.g., Fuji Velvia) with the intention to make print enlargements, is it wise to adjust the exposure reading + or - 1/2 stop for the best possible print?
    - Daniel Deschner

    ANSWER 1:
    Just go to a quality photofinisher. Reliable firms can/will adjust their equipment to give you the results you want. And, today, it appears that Kodak and Fuji have (or will) discontinue the paper that had been used in the past, so that these photofinishers are moving to new digital technology, which should eliminate some of the problems of human error.
    I received a recommendation from a pro several years ago for The Slideprinter, Denver, CO. I have used this firm ever since. I would recommend them highly, especially since I asked for adjustments via telephone that were successfully implemented. Of course, I'm sure there are a lot of other reputable printers out there. Check out one of the major photo magazines as a starting point.
    - John Sandstedt

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12996

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12996

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 10: Effect of Polarizing Filter
    I just got a circular polarizer filter for my SLR camera lens and took a roll of pictures with it ... I thought there was supposed to be a noticeable difference in the sky but noticed very little IF any. What did I do wrong???
    - Michelle Ross

    See Michelle's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    You may try messing with the exposure a little bit. I have a circular polarizer, and I read the exposure guide that came with it and then adjusted how I took the pictures. That seemed to help.
    - Kristen

    ANSWER 2:
    If you are at right angles to the sun, you should be able to see the difference through the viewfinder as you turn the filter. A clear sky will darken, and the color of leaves on trees will become more saturated.
    - George F. Howard

    Visit georgefhoward.com - George's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    For most of them, the sun was behind me and I was shooting with the sky just in the background. I tried to turn the filter as I looked through the viewfinder and just didn't see any difference ... but it isn't a graduated filter. I took some sunset ones tonight, so we'll see how they look. However, I've always had good luck with sunsets even before I used a polarizer.
    - Michelle Ross

    See Michelle's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 4:
    The greatest effect for polarizers on the sky is with the sun at 90 degrees to you. The closer you get to parallel, the less effect it makes. And that's 90 degrees to the side of you. 90 degrees high noon doesn't have that much of an effect as when it's to the side of you. But with winter, the sun is lower in the sky, so high noon will still get a noticeable polarizer look.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 5:
    Hold your hand in the shape of a pistol, with thumb up and index finger as barrel. Point index finger at the sun and move your hand allowing your thumb to scribe an imaginary arc. That's the line where the greatest polarizing effect can be achieved.
    If the sun is to your back when using the filter, you'll get essentially no impact beyond light reduction (due to the density of the filter.) Be careful if you use wide-angle lenses; watch for changes in the intensity of the blue sky at the periphery of the viewfinder. Watch for vignetting (small dark corners in the viewfinder) when you use telephoto lenses.
    - John Sandstedt

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12986

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12986

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ASK YOUR OWN QUESTION ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Ask a question or answer a few from your fellow photographers:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/qnaTOC.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    READ PAST ISSUES OF THE SNAPSHOT NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Read previous issues of SnapShot in the BetterPhoto archives:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/snapshots.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    SIGN UP TO PHOTOFLASH AND THE DIGITAL PICTURE
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Join the fun and master the arts of traditional or digital photography! Participate or follow along as we discuss topics & lessons, practice assignments, and offer feedback on each others' work. Subscribe to our other two free newsletters - PhotoFlash and the Digital Darkroom - at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Get word of your product or service out to our rapidly growing list of 41479 subscribers.

    Learn more about advertising in SnapShot at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/g/advertise.asp

    Until next week, happy shooting!

    Thank you,
    Jim Miotke
    BetterPhoto.com

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    If you would rather not receive SnapShot, you may unsubscribe at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeun.asp?e=

    To change your email address, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeCOA.asp?e=

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Copyright 2005 BetterPhoto.com - All Rights Reserved. No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission.

  • Copyright 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.