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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, November 22, 2004
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* SPOTLIGHT: New Jay Forman Course: Photography for Kids!
* BETTERPHOTO: Susan and Neil Silverman to Guest-Instruct Digital Course
* BETTERPHOTO: Debut of BetterPhoto's Pro Deluxe BetterPholios™
* FEATURED GALLERY: In Praise of Black and White
* FEATURED PLACE: Focus on New England: Boston
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Picture Bride / Getting Good and Close
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Steadying Your Camera at Ground Level ... By Brenda Tharp
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Shooting Indoors Fluorescent Lighting
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Aperture/ Shutter Speed Chart?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Smart Media Card
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: In the Market for a Digital Camera
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Removing Objects from a Photo
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Backgrounds for Portraits
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Hyperfocal Distance
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Exposure and Backlighting
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Extension Tubes Vs. Tele-Converters
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Simple Rules for Using A Tripod
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Moving Water and Slow Motion
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Model Release of Youth Sports
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: How to Remove Unwanted Reflections


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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New Jay Forman Course: Photography for Kids!
Are your kids always taking pictures of their friends or pets? Is your child the one who always has the camera during your family vacations?

If so, Jay Forman's new 4-Week Short Course, “Kids Photography 101,” may be just what they need to take better pictures. Designed specifically for ages 10-16, this online class strives to teach them the basics of photography through activities and lessons that are fun and interesting to them. For all the details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JAY03.asp

Jay also teaches another outstanding course at BetterPhoto: "Capturing Your Kids in Pictures." For details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JAY01.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 187th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Happy Thanksgiving to all who celebrate this wonderful holiday! Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays - I greatly enjoy celebrating such values as family and gratitude. And what an awesome opportunity for picture-taking! So don't be shy this week ... keep your camera at hand, and ask friends and family to help you get great images.

Besides offering holiday greetings, we are thrilled to announce yet another addition to our 4-Week Short Course online program: Jay Forman's "Kids Photography 101." For more information, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JAY03.asp

Also, I am really pleased that two of our outstanding BetterPhoto instructors, Susan and Neil Silverman, will be guest-teaching a section of my "Digital Photography" course. Read all about it in the item below.

And in this issue of SnapShot, don't miss instructor Brenda Tharp's valuable tips on steadying your camera at ground level. In addition, the Featured Gallery focuses on black-and-white photography, while the Featured Place zeroes in on the photogenic city of Boston. And, as always, we have yet another fine collection of questions and answers.

That's it for now. Have a terrific week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Susan and Neil Silverman to Guest-Instruct Digital Course
BetterPhoto founder Jim Miotke has authored and illustrated the popular "Digital Photography" online course, but the highly acclaimed Susan and Neil Silverman will be answering your questions and critiquing your photos. In this exciting online photo course, you will learn - in the best way imaginable - how to use your digital camera. For more information:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/SIL02.asp

Incidentally, another BetterPhoto instructor, Peter K. Burian, guest-instructs a separate section of "Digital Photography." Also, the Silvermans teach another excellent course here at BetterPhoto: "Digital Workout #1: Beginning Digital Photography." For details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/SIL01.asp


*****
Debut of BetterPhoto's Pro Deluxe BetterPholios™
For professional photographers, aspiring pros, and any other serious shooters, BetterPhoto now offers the Pro BetterPholio™s. With the Deluxe Pro package, you get control over the look and feel of your site, ALL of the features of our Deluxe BetterPholios™, PLUS these powerful features: image sales option included; visitor statistics; triple the images (now space for 3,000 photos!); mailing list pages; more email aliases; password-protected private galleries (ideal for posting non-public images for clients, friends, and family); additional wildcard pages (for equipment lists, ordering policies, testimonials, or anything else you wish to add); and enhanced large slide shows (for both galleries AND front page!). For information, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/deluxeProWebsites.asp

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FEATURED GALLERY
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In Praise of Black and White
The simplicity of black and white, says BetterPhoto's Jim Miotke, "helps you focus on the important stuff. You can often turn a drab color shot into an amazing black and white. If you do your own darkroom work - traditional or digital - it opens up a world of magic and fun." Check out the outstanding work of BP members and instructors, and you'll see exactly what Jim means! See the gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=55

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FEATURED PLACE
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Focus on New England: Boston
Residents of the beautiful city of Boston have a lot to brag about these days - after the Boston Red Sox recently won baseball's World Series. But the city always has had a lot to brag about - in particular, quite a bit of picture-taking potential. In fact, check out how BetterPhoto members have captured Boston's wonderful architecture, spectacular skyline, etc., in the gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=431

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
In the movie Picture Bridge, what is the deception that puts the story into motion?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member James Curtis is:
A mail-order bride only has a picture of her husband-to-be and, when she gets to him, finds that he is much older then the picture represents.

See James's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=65120

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Getting Good and Close - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

One of the most notable pieces of photographic advice is this one: "If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough." That quote is attributed to what legendary photographer?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Steadying Your Camera at Ground Level ... By Brenda Tharp
If your tripod doesn't get low enough when you want to work at ground level for those mouse-eye macro views you want, here's an inexpensive method of stabilizing your camera and lens: Fill a Ziploc bag with dried rice, beans, or sand, leaving enough space to allow it to move around a bit. Rest the camera/lens on the bag. You'll have to smush it around a bit to get into position, but once you do, it will stay there. Then, to be sure you don't shake the camera, use either a remote release or a self-timer to trigger the shutter release.

Take Brenda Tharp's online courses:



Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
  • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
  • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
  • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Shooting Indoors Fluorescent Lighting
I have a Nikon D70 and am often asked to take pictures for our congregation. The room we are renting has fluorescent lighting. I will set to the widest aperture I can get (about f4) on aperture-priority, focal length will of 60mm, and everything else is on auto including white balance. My photos always turn out with a yellowish hue to it, and it looks so ugly, like my subjects have a liver disease or something. What can I do to fix this problem?
- Baloi Valenzuela

See Sample Photo - Sample of yellowish hue photo:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=623842

ANSWER 1:
Set your white balance to fluorescent before you take the photos (or use the RAW format, if that is available). For photos already taken, use a photo editing program to adjust the hue.
- George F. Howard

Visit georgefhoward.com - George's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12729

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12729

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*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Aperture/ Shutter Speed Chart?
I am new to the settings-capable digital format. I have been reading the QnA selections regarding aperture and shutter speed settings ... apparently you need to make sure the settings jive for success in different situations. Is there a chart that tells what the best combination of settings are for aperture/shutter speed/ISO settings?
Thanks.
- Don K. Hewey

ANSWER 1:
Estimations are for general situations like bright daylight and overcast days ... because it all depends on light levels.
The F/16 rule is a general bright daylight that's pretty accurate. F/16 for aperture and shutter speed is 1/film speed. Go from there if you change film type or apertures.
Fpr overcast days, open 1 1/2 stops, but some overcast days are darker or lighter than others.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Use your camera's meter. Shoot in shiftable Program (or aperture-priority or shutter-priority) and the camera will choose the appropriate exposure, then you can shift it to get the aperture (to control depth of field) or shutter speed (to control motion capture) you desire. If the combination is not to your liking you can further adjust it by changing ISO.

Example: ISO 200, P mode gives you initial f/8 1/250. For less depth of field, you can shift to f/5.6 1/500, f/4 1/1000, f/2.8 f/2000. If instead you want greater depth of field AND faster shutter speed to stop motion, switch to ISO 400, which will then get you to f/8 1/500.

The same applies in aperture-priority and shutter-priority modes, where you can directly set the aperture or shutter speed you want.
- Jon Close

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12720

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12720

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*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Smart Media Card
I have a Dazzle drive card reader. I removed my SmartMedia card from my camera, put it in the Dazzle drive, and transferred the pics to my PC. Then I deleted the pics from the card, using Windows Explorer. Now when I put the card in my camera, I get a card error and can't use the card. This is the second time this has happened! I am able to copy pictures back to the card using Windows Explorer, but I can't get it to work in my camera. Can anyone help me?
- Andrea Lester

ANSWER 1:
Try putting your card back into your Dazzle reader, open "My Computer", click on the card drive. Delete all on the card. Then create a folder called DCIM. Then put card back into your camera and see if it works. It may also need to be re-formatted by your camera.
- Kip T. Berger

See Kip's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
P.S.- Once you get the card working, DO NOT use Windows Explorer to delete your photos; delete the photos using your camera's menu option for deleting all photos. Then you won't keep having this problem re-occur.
- Kip T. Berger

See Kip's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
If your camera has a format memory function, you should format the card. The function will both erase the card and assure that it is set up properly for your camera.
- George F. Howard

Visit georgefhoward.com - George's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12708

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12708

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: In the Market for a Digital Camera
I want to buy a digital camera that doesn't have a long delay. I also don't want one that is more than $300. What kind should I get?
- Meghan LaRue Beard

ANSWER 1:
Meghan, why not give these digital cameras a look? Nikon Coolpix 4300, Sony Cybershot DSC-P52, Canon Powershot S30, and Olympus Stylus 300D. All have a budget of $300 or less.
Dealers like A&M Photo World (www.amphoworld.com), Broadway Photo (www.bwayphoto.com ) and The Camera Source Inc. (www.thecamerasource.com) sell all these at LOW prices.
- Buddy Purugganan

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12697

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12697

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Removing Objects from a Photo
Hi,I have PhotoImpact 8 and I can't figure out how to take a photograph and take out a certain object you may not want in the photograph. And I am talking about a digital photograph. Any suggestions helpful! Thanks, Pansey
- Terry L.

ANSWER 1:
Since you said "take out a certain object you may not want in the photograph", you want to keep the rest of the image intact? Your best option then is to take a surrounding area adjacent to the image you wish to delete and use your clone tool to place that over top the object you wish removed or hidden.
Depending on the object's size you wish to remove, and the amount of "background" of which to clone over that object will determine how time-consuming or difficult it will be. When you click on your clone tool icon in the left toolbar, you determine what is to be cloned by moving the mouse cursor to that area and pressing the shift key. That sets the source area to be used during the clone process.
Then, holding down the muse or graphics tablet pen, you move it over top the area you wish to hide. As you move the mouse/pen right, left, up, down, etc., the area used to clone is mirrored. So you have to watch that you don't go outside the area you wish to use as the clone material.
- Kip T. Berger

See Kip's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
This site has an article that explains the cloning process.

Follow this link:
http://www.betterphoto.com/digital/rubberstamping.asp


- George F. Howard

Visit georgefhoward.com - George's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12690

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12690

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Backgrounds for Portraits
What kind of backdrops are used in photo studios (like in the mall ... Picture People, Kinderfoto)? The white backdrop isn't muslin and it isn't vinyl. It kind of looks like paper, but it has a glossy finish on it.
- Wendy McCollum

ANSWER 1:
You might find some you like here:
Denny Manufacturing Co.

Their flex backgrounds are great for portability.
- Kip T. Berger

See Kip's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12689

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12689

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Hyperfocal Distance
Hi All,
Can somebody explain me what a hyperfocal distance is and how to calculate this distance for your camera? Comments welcome. Thanks.
- Manish Issar

ANSWER 1:
Hyperfocal distance is a variant on depth of field. Because your camera focuses on an image plane, there is a zone of acceptable sharpness in front of and behind the focal plane.

Generally, the zone of acceptable sharpness extends one third in front of the focal plane, two thirds behind. Therefore, if you focus at infinity all of the "two thirds behind the focal plane" is lost - since everything to infinity is sharp anyway.

To take advantage of hyperfocal distance, an optical property of the lens, you actually focus at a distance in front of the desired focal plane. You'll achieve acceptable focus in front of the plane of focus and behind it.

Non-zoom lenses have markings to allow you to focus and re-set for hyperfocal distance. These markings do not exist for zoom lenses.

Since it's an optical property, hyperfocal distance can be calculated. Here's the formula:

HFD = F X F/f X d, where

HFD = hyperfocal distance
F = focal le\ngth of lens in inches
f = diaphragm stop (f/stop)
d = diameter of accepted circle of confusion (1/1000 of the focal length; but use 1/200 inch as a starting point.)

You can get a great HFD table at:
johnhendry.com/gadget/hf.php

Hope this helps.
- John Sandstedt

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12685

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12685

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: Exposure and Backlighting
At sunset, when shooting a backlit scene - AND you want detail in the highlights and the sky - where do you meter from? If you meter from the darker areas, won't you blow out the highlights? I uploaded a photo as an example.
- Frank P. Luongo

See Frank's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Meter for the background, and let the shadows in the foreground fall where they may (even if they silhouette). This will be the lesser of two evils.
A deep blue sky with the sun at your back can be your best friend. The reflected light values of the bridge and of the distant sky, will be close enough to render both with detail and color. (You should still meter the sky, though.)
If the sun is in front of you, or if the sky is LIGHT blue - and you meter the bridge - your sky will wash out completely.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Thanks, Bob.
- Frank P. Luongo

See Frank's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12678

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12678

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*****


NEW QUESTION 9: Extension Tubes Vs. Tele-Converters
What is the difference between an extension tube and a tele-converter lens? Which one is better in terms of output/money ratio? I have a Canon Rebel EOS K2 SLR and would like to go macro. What do you suggest? I want to take decent pictures of floral parts - like the stamens. What magnification would that be? I was looking at ebay, and there are several mm tubes 12, 25, 35, etc. I am really getting confused. Could someone help?
Thanks, Manish
- Manish Issar

ANSWER 1:
The main difference between teleconverters and extension tubes is that the 'tubes contain no glass elements and the teleconverters do.
Also, teleconverters will increase the focal length throughout the entire focusing range - from the minimum focusing distance all the way to infinity. The extension tubes can only be used for close-up work ... as their basic function is to decrease your close-focing ability.
As an example, let's say you're using a 100mm lens that can focus from 12" to infinity. With a 2X-teleconverter, you could still focus from 12" to infinity, but the image would be twice as large.
With the same lens, and extension tubes, you could focus to 10", 6", or closer, depending upon how many millimeters of 'tubes you place between your camera and lens. The image size would be magnified exponentially, but you would lose the ability to focus on a distant object.
As to which is better for shooting close-ups of flowers, I would go with the extension tubes. They can be used with any lens of the same mount, and will allow you to get super-close.
Ideally, a true "macro-lens" would be the best option, but extension tubes can be a cheaper alternative.
Whichever you choose, depth of field and light loss are inevitable. A tripod and a small aperture are recommended.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12675

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12675

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*****


NEW QUESTION 10: Simple Rules for Using A Tripod
I have a Nikon D70 and I just purchased a Promaster 6400 tripod. When I put my camera on the tripod with a 70-300mm lens, I am still having problems with camera shake and also getting the camera not to fall forwards due to the weight of the lens. Can anyone help with some basic rules for using tripods ... such as camera stabilization, when to use it, how to set it up, do I have an adequate tripod for my camera equipment, etc.? Any help would be appreciated, as I am a total beginner and trying to soak up anything I can to get better photos. Thanks so much for your help. You guys are great!
- Debra M. Watkins

ANSWER 1:
I'm not aware of that camera model, but you can buy sand bags to hang from the legs to provide added stability.
Also, are you attaching the camera by the base of the camera or by the lens adapter for the tripod? Most fast lenses tend to be bigger and heavier and come with an adapter to use to mount to the tripod with, helping to balance the weight of the camera and lens on the tripod. This helps to relieve stress on your camera's lens mount also.
In addition, try using your remote or a cable release to fire your camera. If your camera offers mirror lockup, then use it to prevent camera shake when the mirror flips up. It will allow the mirror to be flipped up and locked prior to the actual exposure.
- Kip T. Berger

See Kip's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
A 70-300 shouldn't be heavy enough to be a problem for a tripod. Are you sure you have everything tight?
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
The above advice is great for eliminating camera-shake. For your "tipping over" problem, just make certain that you position your tripod so that you are standing in a gap between two legs when you shoot. This will place the third leg directly under the lens and make the support system less "top-heavy".
If it still seems a bit unstable, you can shorten the back two legs just a tad, which will off-set the center of gravity and give you more stability.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12668

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12668

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*****


NEW QUESTION 11: Moving Water and Slow Motion
How do I take pictures of waterfalls in such a way that the waters flow in a silky manner? What is the shutter speed that should be used for that type of photography? Is there any other method or ways for photographing waterfalls or running water differently?
- JEEVAN

ANSWER 1:
Yes, you'll want a slow shutter speed and it would be best to shoot on an overcast day. You can also use an ND Filter to cut back on the light and allowing the slower shutter speeds you're after.
Some Trial and Error, and you should soon get the settings that you find satisfactory....
hth
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Excellent advice from Damian on achieving the "silky" flowing-motion effect in moving water! Besides avoiding bright-and-sunny conditions:

  • Use a small aperture (high f/stop number).
  • Go with a low ISO (i.e., 100).
  • Good advice, too, on the deep-tinted ND filter. Yet another option is the polarizing filter, which is also deep-tinted. The polarizer not only cuts the amount of light entering the lens, it also can remove the shine from wet surfaces and, thus, beef up the colors.
  • You'll also need a tripod or other camera support, due to the slow shutter speeds.
  • But perhaps the best tip comes from Damian: Don't forget trial and error (i.e., vary the shutter speeds)!
    Have fun shooting!
    - Kerry Drager

    See Kerry Drager's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Kerry Drager's Web Site - KerryDrager.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
    Point, Think, and Shoot: Beyond the Snapshot
    Field Techniques: Light and Composition
    4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups
    4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups (2nd Session)

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12645

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12645

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Model Release of Youth Sports
    I'm interested in starting a Youth Sports (action) Photography business, but I have a few questions on model release. First, do I need a model release in order to post the photos on my Web site so it could be viewed and purchased? Second, is a model release required to use the photos in my portfolio?
    Thanks.
    - Steve H. Kajihiro

    ANSWER 1:
    You will need a release to use for promotional purposes, but not for posting images to your site. As long as you are contracted or have an agreement to be on the premises shooting, parents will not have a problem with you shooting and posting their kids. If someone contacts you upset that their child is on your site, just politely agree to pull the image and let them know that you are the photographer for their league. The parent may come around and even purchase prints from you down the road.
    - Chuck A. Muirhead

    ANSWER 2:
    I've heard conflicting advice on this. It is my understanding that if the person (or youth) is recognizable, you need a release. There are too many cases of unhappily divorced parents, and many parents would not want their child's photo on your Web site without their permission! Check with a legal expert before posting!
    - Diane L. Dupuis-Kallos

    See Diane's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    Years ago, I was at Taste of Chicago with a friend. We were sitting on the sidewalk munching on a hot dog when a guy with a TV camera began filming us. I said something like, "Hey, they are shooting us," and my friend looked at the camera and said: "No, they're not. They don't have permission to use my likeness". The guy behind the camera said permission is not needed since we were in public at a public event.
    - Carl Schulz

    ANSWER 4:
    If you are going to use the pictures for promotional purposes, to help sell your pictures or your photography services, you will need a model release. With youth, it is always wise to get a model release for some of the reasons listed above. You should not have a problem posting the pictures so parents can buy them, but you might want to password-protect the images. Many times you can compensate the parents for signing a model release by giving them a picture.
    - Keith Johnston

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12526

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12526

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    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: How to Remove Unwanted Reflections
    I recently took some early morning pictures that turned out fantastic, except for one problem: Whenever I shot into the sun, several of the photos had cascading, hexagonal reflections in them. I realize this happens in such a situation, but I like the intense light and the star effect that I am able to achieve when shooting into the sun. I thought that the coating on most lenses decreased this effect. Should I invest in a higher quality lens with a specific type of coating or is there a filter that would help in this situation? I know that a polarizer reduces reflections in water and other such surfaces, but it proves ineffective in cases of shooting into the sun.
    Thanks.
    - Juanita

    ANSWER 1:
    What you're describing is commonly known as "lens flare" ... an unfortunate by-product of shooting directly into a bright light source. The hexagonal shapes are actually light reflections of the aperture blades of your lens. The only way I know to avoid this is to NOT shoot directly into the sun. A lens hood can help to shield stray light from entering the front element but will not eliminate the effect if you're shooting directly at the sun.
    - Bob Cammarata

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    ANSWER 2:
    The cascading hexagons is called "ghosting" - internal reflections of the diaphragm off the many lens element surfaces common in zooms. Multicoating does lessen this effect, and flare, but does not necessarily eliminate it.
    (a) Using a lens hood can sometimes help.
    (b) If you are using an SLR camera, the effect will be visible in the viewfinder. Watch for it, and you can sometimes make small changes in your composition to lessen or eliminate the effect. Try pointing more directly or away from the bright light source. If you have depth of field preview you can see that the ghosting is also affected by the aperture chosen.
    (c) Prime lenses with fewer lens elements, and hence fewer internal reflective surfaces, are less prone to this effect.
    (d) Use it to artistic effect. Some people like the effect and photo editing software often has a feature to add this ghosting to photos that don't have it.
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 3:
    Hi Juanita: Excellent advice from Bob and Jon! I like shooting scenes that include the sun - well, actually, just a piece of the sun peeking out from behind a tree, statue, or other object. With a small aperture, you can then get a nice starburst effect. One other thing that can help in reducing the amount of lens flare in scenes that include the sun is this: Remove any unnecessary filters (including "protective" ones and polarizers) from the front of your lens. Again, you won't eliminate the flare entirely, but the extra glass (filter) could result in extra reflections in the image.
    Have fun shooting, Juanita!
    Kerry
    - Kerry Drager

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    ANSWER 4:
    My method for removing flare, provided you are not pointing DIRECTLY at the sun, is to throw a shadow onto the lens. You may be able to do this by getting into the shade of a tree trunk, a car, or another person. Alternatively, you can hold a flat object over the lens - a wide-brimmed hat works but is awkward, a flat sheet of non-reflective cardboard, or a device made for the purpose (e.g. a circle of fabric, rimmed with a flexible material, which can be twisted into a quarter of the area for storage). Such a device is called a French ... something, I forget exactly. I have one with neutral grey on one side (incident light reading) and black on the other - from a good photo store. Others may have a reflective surface - for photofill. Two tools in one! Just make sure it doesn't show in the viewfinder - I have a dozen shots of my hat.
    - Charlie

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