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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Tuesday, November 02, 2004
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* SPOTLIGHT: New Course By Charlie Borland Launches Winter Schedule
* BETTERPHOTO: Book of the Month: Jay Forman's Capture Your Kids in Pictures
* BETTERPHOTO: Lewis Kemper's Photo Adventure: Winter Wildlife, Horse Round-up
* BETTERPHOTO: Photo of the Day: A Daily Showcase of Creativity
* FEATURED GALLERY: Focus on Children Outdoor Portraits
* FEATURED PLACE: Focus on Spain and Portugal
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Word Play / Career Switch
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Prevent Camera Shake When on a Tripod ... By Brenda Tharp
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Which Close-up Accessory?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: How to Focus for Portraiture?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Considering a New Camera
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Handheld vs. Tripod
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Issues for Professional Photographers
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: How to Remove Unwanted Reflections
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Best Speed Film for Shooting Wildlife?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Macro Lens for Nikon D70
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Ideas for High School Shooter
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: How to Make a Photography Project
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Shooting in a Bowling Alley
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Tripod: Pan Head Vs. Ball Head
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Broken Dreams
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 3: Can I Get Sharp 10x15 Prints?


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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New Course By Charlie Borland Launches Winter Schedule
Are you ready to take the next leap in your photographic ability? Then join award-winning commercial photographer Charlie Borland in his new online class, "Lighting for Commercial Photography." In this 8-week adventure, Charlie shares his knowledge in a step-by-step approach to making the jump from lighting novice to experienced lighting technician. Check it out at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/CBL02.asp

More exciting courses at BetterPhoto are on tap this winter too ... with such subjects as: beginning photography, composition and the art of seeing, digital photography, shooting technique, business and marketing, lighting and exposure, and other Photoshop and specialty subjects. See the complete schedule at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 184th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Lots of exciting news at BetterPhoto as November kicks off. First, we've posted our winter schedule of online photo courses, and our lineup has never been better! Charlie Borland is checking in with a brand-new course, "Lighting for Commercial Photography," but we have plenty of other classes that cover a variety of subjects and skill levels. See all of our offerings at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp

This month, we spotlight another book by one of our outstanding instructors: "Capture Your Kids in Pictures" by Jay Forman. Read more about this Book of the Month selection below.

Also in this issue of SnapShot, don't miss instructor Brenda Tharp's valuable advice for preventing camera shake on a tripod. In addition, the Featured Gallery focuses on children outdoor portraits, while the Featured Place zeroes in on Spain and Portugal. And, as always, we have an informative collection of questions and answers.

That's it for now. Have an enjoyable week of photography!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Book of the Month: Jay Forman's Capture Your Kids in Pictures
Our online store showcases the fantastic books and DVDs from our staff of BetterPhoto instructors. For November, we put the spotlight on Jay Forman's awesome book, "Capture Your Kids in Pictures: Simple Techniques for Taking Great Family Photos With Any Camera." If you buy this book before the end of November, you will receive free U.S. shipping. Best yet, it's autographed by Jay! For all the details on this selection:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1204

Jay is also the instructor of two excellent online photo courses here at BetterPhoto.com:

  • "Capturing Your Kids in Pictures":
    http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JAY01.asp

  • "Beginning Photography" (guest instructor):
    http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JAY02.asp


    *****
    Lewis Kemper's Photo Adventure: Winter Wildlife, Horse Round-up
    Instructor Lewis Kemper announces a unique opportunity to capture incredible photographs of North America wildlife - February 10-16, 2005, in Montana! Featured attractions include wolves, bobcats, lynx, mountain lion, coyote and more, but there will also be such winter animals as the Arctic fox, Arctic wolf and the Siberian tiger! And, says Lewis: "To top it all off, we have the unique opportunity to photograph a herd of 10-12 colorful horses being run through the snow (weather conditions permitting) managed by several wranglers, dressed in Western clothing!" For all the details, go to:
    http://www.lewiskemper.com/generic4.html

    Incidentally, Lewis also teaches three excellent online courses right here at BetterPhoto.com: Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop - Toolbox #1, #2, and #3. Check out these courses at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp


    *****
    Photo of the Day: A Daily Showcase of Creativity
    Our new daily newsletter, Photo of the Day, has provided a daily showcase of outstanding pictures! The images are selected from either our monthly photo contest or from the excellent work of our online course instructors. In addition to being inspired by awe-inspiring images each day, subscribers receive brief announcements and occasional photo tips from our team of instructors. To learn more or to subscribe, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp

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    FEATURED GALLERY
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    Focus on Children Outdoor Portraits
    Children are such a popular subject for BetterPhoto members and instructors. Take a look at this awesome gallery, and you'll see why! Yes, there are all sorts of cute-and-creative shots of cute kids, but the photo possibilities are really endless: great candids, funny poses, striking portraits, and so much more. And this is one of the many subjects that looks good in either color or black and white. For shooting ideas and inspiration, go to the children outdoor portraits gallery:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=437

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    FEATURED PLACE
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    Focus on Spain and Portugal
    Images of beautiful scenery and outstanding architecture are some of the photographic highlights of this BetterPhoto gallery. In fact, BP shooters have captured everything from intimate details to broad landscapes to blazing sunsets. And, of course, there are some wonderful pictures of the people of Spain and Portugal. For a good rundown of the color and character of this photogenic slice of the world, go to:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=180

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    PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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    Last week, we asked:
    The word photography is derived from words meaning what?

    The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Mariusz Sarzyński is:
    The word photography comes from two Greek words - photos (means "the light") and graphics (means "to draw").

    To see all answers to this question, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

    And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Career Switch - entered by BetterPhoto member Kerry Drager

    Here's a two-part question: 1) What was Ansel Adams' first career? 2) What important photographer influenced Ansel to switch gears and go into photography full-time?



    Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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    THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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    Prevent Camera Shake When on a Tripod ... By Brenda Tharp

    Camera shake is so disappointing! Even when you are on a tripod, you can get it, if using long telephoto lenses, slow shutter speeds, or no cable release! Here are some ideas for preventing camera shake:

    1) Do not use the center column on your tripod unless circumstances really require it - when extended, it causes an instability - quite the opposite from what you would think when on a tripod!

    2) Always use a remote shutter release (also known as a cable release, remote trigger, remote cable release etc.) what's the point of being on a tripod if you are pressing on the camera body to make the picture?

    3) Use the self-timer if you don't have a remote release - this will be a more gentle method of triggering the shutter release.

    4) Use the mirror lock-up function on your camera, if it has one, and then trigger the shutter with a remote release (if not photographing people or wildlife moments). Also, when using long telephoto lenses on a tripod, even the mirror locking up can cause camera shake, most noticeable in shutter speeds ranging 1/60 to 1 second. To prevent this:

    1) Always be sure to mount the lens to the tripod, not the camera. This creates a better balance of the weight. (Use a remote release when possible.)

    2) When using long lenses in a breeze, hang your camera bag or some other weighted object over the lens, for added stability. (Use a remote release when possible.)

    Take Brenda Tharp's online courses:



    Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

    Add Your Own Tip:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
    My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
    • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
    • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
    • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
    You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

    BetterPhoto.com
    P.O. Box 2781
    Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

    To order online, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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    NEW QUESTION 1: Which Close-up Accessory?
    I'm looking for a close-up accessory for my camera. Price limit: $70. Any ideas?
    Thanks.
    - Anita White

    ANSWER 1:
    I don't know what kind of camera you have. If it's an SLR, the Tiffen close-up lens set (+1, +2, and +4) costs from $36 (49mm) to $85 (72mm), depending on the lens diameter. I have a set and used them before I got my macro lens. I found the +4 I used the most. Focusing has to be manual for critical sharpness. Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12363

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12363

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 2: How to Focus for Portraiture?
    I have read that I should focus recompose while taking portraits, that this will produce a sharper image than having my focus locked on center. What exactly does focus recompose mean?
    - Gina Cellino

    ANSWER 1:
    It's difficult to answer when the phrase is taken out of context, but my guess is that the author was referring to portraiture with an autofocus system. Generally speaking, the sharpest part of a portrait should be the eyes - so you let the autofocus system focus on the eyes (i.e., point the focusing mark at the eyes), lock that focus, and then compose the portrait as you want.
    - George F. Howard

    Visit georgefhoward.com - George's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12353

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12353

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 3: Considering a New Camera
    I have had my Olympus 750 ultra zoom for only one year. I have learned a great deal through BetterPhoto, and now I am thinking of buying a SLR. Should I wait or go for it? I have only done ANY type of photography for one year.
    - MARTHA A. RUMLEY

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Martha. It depends on your finances, and how much you enjoy photography. Were you meaning a film or digital SLR?
    You may wish to wait if only to decide what type of photos you will enjoy doing the most. Then use the money saved to invest in accessories for that - like studio lights, reflectors, backgrounds, flashes, tripods, camera bags, monopod, light stands, memory cards, etc. When you do decide to go with a digital or film SLR, start saving for more lenses, filters, etc.
    Good luck with your endeavor. Regardless of what you decide to do ... just keep enjoying yourself and capturing images.
    - Kip T. Berger

    See Kip's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12352

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12352

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 4: Handheld vs. Tripod
    As a general rule, what should be the slowest shutter speed to use before going to a tripod?
    - Ben Baxter

    ANSWER 1:
    1/60 of a second. Any slower and you risk blur. :)
    - Shauna

    ANSWER 2:
    A general rule of thumb is 1/focal length. So with a 28mm lens 1/30, 1/50 with a 50mm, 1/200 with 200mm, etc. But the rule is very general. With macro close-ups, the image magnification also magnifies camera movement, so using a 50mm macro lens focused to 5 inches you may get camera shake blur up to 1/125. Similar with extreme telephoto lengths, 1/500 may not be fast enough to give a sharp image with 400mm lens. Also, the rule of thumb is intended for use when making prints 8"x12" or smaller. For larger-size prints or projected slides, camera shake is exaggerated, so you'd need shutter speeds faster than 1/focal length.

    As with most things, your mileage may vary. With very good technique - well braced, controlled breathing, gentle shutter button push, etc. - some can shoot handheld at slower shutter speeds than the rule of thumb, while others may need faster speeds.

    An Image Stabilized (aka Vibration Reduction or Optical Stabilized) lens can be handheld at 2 or more stops slower shutter speeds (i.e., 1/60 instead of 1/250 for a 250mm lens).
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12349

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12349

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 5: Issues for Professional Photographers
    I have a weird request. I am a photo student at the University of Utah. I'm taking a professional writing class and have to write an argumentative paper on social issues in the field of photography. I have no idea what kinds of issues professional photographers face and was wondering if anyone could give me some insight. Thanks for your help.
    - Meili

    ANSWER 1:
    Getting pictures of other people's misery for the sake of getting the story out - especially in journalism.
    A PBS show about media in Iraq showed a family that was having a funeral for a relative. A handful of photographers were there, and most were getting in front of a group of crying women to get a closer picture. A couple of the photographers talked about it later that day. Some feel, "I've got a job that needs to be done".
    Most prize-winning pictures in journalism involve other people's misery - as in war areas, famine, extreme health problems like AIDS. There's the side that people need to know what's going on outside of comfy suburbs.
    But there's still the side that's universal regardless of where you're from that people don't like to be portrayed when they're in a bad situation. You can imagine your worst moment and somebody wanting to get a picture of it.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    I was doing portrait work through a studio, and we got a call from a large family who wanted to do some Chrismas photos. One of there children was paralyzed, with other problems as well. He even had a tube that he had to breathe through in his neck, so we had shut down the studio for the day and had a full staff cleaning all day long.

    That night, when they came in, I was one that the manager picked to do the shots. I remember the parents thanking me for doing the photos and explained that their son was expected to die soon, so this was the last time they would all be together for photos.

    So you have to detach yourself at times to be able to even take photos. Sometimes it's at people's worst time, but other times it's at their last time. You still do have a job to do.
    - Kim

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12348

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12348

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 6: How to Remove Unwanted Reflections
    I recently took some early morning pictures that turned out fantastic, except for one problem: Whenever I shot into the sun, several of the photos had cascading, hexagonal reflections in them. I realize this happens in such a situation, but I like the intense light and the star effect that I am able to achieve when shooting into the sun. I thought that the coating on most lenses decreased this effect. Should I invest in a higher quality lens with a specific type of coating or is there a filter that would help in this situation? I know that a polarizer reduces reflections in water and other such surfaces, but it proves ineffective in cases of shooting into the sun.
    Thanks.
    - Juanita

    ANSWER 1:
    What you're describing is commonly known as "lens flare" ... an unfortunate by-product of shooting directly into a bright light source. The hexagonal shapes are actually light reflections of the aperture blades of your lens. The only way I know to avoid this is to NOT shoot directly into the sun. A lens hood can help to shield stray light from entering the front element but will not eliminate the effect if you're shooting directly at the sun.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    The cascading hexagons is called "ghosting" - internal reflections of the diaphragm off the many lens element surfaces common in zooms. Multicoating does lessen this effect, and flare, but does not necessarily eliminate it.
    (a) Using a lens hood can sometimes help.
    (b) If you are using an SLR camera, the effect will be visible in the viewfinder. Watch for it, and you can sometimes make small changes in your composition to lessen or elminate the effect. Try pointing more directly or away from the bright light source. If you have depth of field preview you can see that the ghosting is also affected by the aperture chosen.
    (c) Prime lenses with fewer lens elements, and hence fewer internal reflective surfaces, are less prone to this effect.
    (d) Use it to artistic effect. Some people like the effect and photo editing software often has a feature to add this ghosting to photos that don't have it.
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 3:
    Hi Juanita: Excellent advice from Bob and Jon! I like shooting scenes that include the sun - well, actually, just a piece of the sun peeking out from behind a tree, statue, or other object. With a small aperture, you can then get a nice starburst effect. One other thing that can help in reducing the amount of lens flare in scenes that include the sun is this: Remove any unnecessary filters (including "protective" ones and polarizers) from the front of your lens. Again, you won't eliminate the flare entirely, but the extra glass (filter) could result in extra reflections in the image.
    Have fun shooting, Juanita!
    Kerry
    - Kerry Drager

    See Kerry Drager's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Kerry Drager's Web Site - KerryDrager.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
    Point, Think, and Shoot: Beyond the Snapshot
    Field Techniques: Light and Composition
    4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups
    4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups (2nd Session)

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12344

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12344

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 7: Best Speed Film for Shooting Wildlife?
    What is the best ASA or ISO film for shooting wildlife in cloudy lowlight atmosphere and in dense forests?
    - JEEVAN

    ANSWER 1:
    As low as you can shoot with the light level, lens, and how much motion you can deal with. If you can get a picture with 400, that's the best. But if it's so dark that 400 gets you a too slow of a shutter speed and everything's blurry, bring along some 800.
    You can make 800 your cut-off, because 1600 isn't going to be all that great for any wildlife.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    It can also be related to timing ... and the quarry you are seeking. I've used 100 ASA (pushed to 200) on wildlife around dawn, but I had to wait until they were almost motionless before taking the shot. Typical shutter speeds will range from 1/15 to 1/60 - not ideal, but workable with a tripod (and cooperative subjects). See enclosed example.
    Generally, though, I would agree that 400 or 800 ASA would be more practical to shoot wildlife in low light ... especially when shooting hand-held.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    See Sample Photo - Doe Eyes:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=593430

    ANSWER 3:
    It depends on what kind of wildlife you are shooting. I used 1/1000 sec (aperture priority) to shoot fighting cranes in the air with ISO 800 in a hazy morning. Only with such high speed their action and the falling feathers in the mid air can be frozen. But when shooting birds in the forest, ISO 400 is enough.
    - Tom Kwan

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12335

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12335

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 8: Macro Lens for Nikon D70
    Hello everyone,
    I just purchased a Nikon D70, and it came with the 18-70 lens. Is this lens good for macro shots? I am looking to photograph insects, flowers, etc. I am very new at using a digital SLR, so I could use some help with what other macro lens to buy. Thanks very much for any help.
    - Mike A. Cocita

    ANSWER 1:
    I have the 60mm Micro Nikkor. It's awesome. Goes up to F36!! Sharp as a tack ... great depth of field control whether you want everything in focus or just want selective focus! Not all that expensive either!!
    - Heather K. McFarland

    See Heather's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Cool, thanks, I did see that one, I think that will be my choice. Have you submitted any pics using that lens? Thanks for your help.
    - Mike A. Cocita

    ANSWER 3:
    Yes ... there are bunches of them in my gallery. Fading, The Pollinator, Thirsty little bugger ... and many more. Just click on any image that looks like it might be a macro shot. I always list the lens used in the descriptions!!
    - Heather K. McFarland

    See Heather's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12332

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12332

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 9: Ideas for High School Shooter
    I began photography about a year ago. I take pictures for my high school newspaper. Next year, I plan to do the yearbook's photography also. I have a good understanding of the camera's functions and abilities. I feel I've reach a point were experimentation is the next step. Do you have any ideas on good experiments I can do to get a better understanding of lighting, composition, exposure and such? Also, do you have any tips for me?
    - Jack G.

    ANSWER 1:
    Start taking pictures of stuff. Go down to the slow range of shutter speeds, and experiment. Start taking pictures of people. Do some candids, do some pictures of friends. Take your camera with you if you go hang out with them at whatever burger place is in your town. Get pictures that if seen by somebody who has never been around you or your friends, they'll see why you like hanging out with them. Or at least try to.
    Do a personal photo essay assignment of documenting life in high school, which is essentially what the yearbook tries to do, anyway.
    Look at CD covers, and think about ways to shoot groups of people - like the drama club, or homecoming people in something different besides a photo with five in front, five in back.

    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12326

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12326

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 10: How to Make a Photography Project
    Hi! I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this question, but I here it is: How do you start a photography project?
    I guess the answer may be easy: "Just think about something you want to shoot, and that's all", but I wonder if there is something more to think about. I'm sure there must be something else than, say, "I'll make a project about roses, so I'll picture 1000 of them".
    Do you have any experience with that?? Thanks in advance.
    - Jordi Delgado

    See Jordi's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    Although I have not done any "projects", here's a thought. You want to tell a "story" with your photos. Ho about taking a photo of a rose at the florist? Then, a photo of the rose being wrapped. A photo of the rose being delivered. A photo of the facial expression of the recipient. That's a story. That's a project. Just shooting the rose 1000 times is just shooting it at different angle. Got the idea? Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 2:
    Yes, I thing I get it. Never thought about it this way. I didn't know what, but I felt there had to be something else.
    Thanks for your answer, Andy. It's helped me a lot!!!
    :-))
    - Jordi Delgado

    See Jordi's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12300

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12300

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    NEW QUESTION 11: Shooting in a Bowling Alley
    Hi, I will be photographing in a bowling alley this weekend and was wondering what film I should use and would I need flash. I don't think there will be a lot of light, so maybe ISO 400 is good? Thank you.
    - Vadim Boriskevich

    ANSWER 1:
    Hello, I have done some photography in bowling alleys. I used ISO 200 with a flash and did very well. Hope this helps!
    - Hope J. Waller

    ANSWER 2:
    You should try shooting at slower speeds with available light - to record the motion of the ball traveling toward the pins, or the actual impact as they strike the "pocket". To do this, you will need a tripod and a shutter speed of 1/30 or 1/15 second. You will also need a cooperative "model" (bowler), who can remain perfectly motionless while the shutter is open.
    This look might give you a new twist to an old, familiar scene.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12285

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12285

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Tripod: Pan Head Vs. Ball Head
    I have the Canon EOS Digital Rebel and am looking to start up a photography studio in the future. I am starting to build up my equipment at the moment, while I learn about taking pictures. I need a good tripod but don't want to spend a fortune on one. There are a lot to choose from, and I have narrowed it down to a few that I have in mind. I would be using it for studio shooting mostly. Does anyone know about the Slik Pro 330DX Tripod w/3-way pan/tilt quick release head? It is about $90. That is within reason price for me.
    Also, one of my questions is what is better, pan head or ball head, and what is the difference between the two when it comes to shooting? I keep seeing both of them but don't know about the difference and can't find any info on them to know. So any help would be much appreciated. I am a true beginner at all of this. Thank you!
    - Kari L.

    ANSWER 1:
    A ball head is like the ball-and-socket joint of your shoulder. You loosen it and you can swivel in all directions.
    A pan head is like what you might commonly expect a tripod to be. You have the two things to loosen to adjust the camera. You can loosen one thing, and only swivel up and down like nodding your head yes. Or loosen just the other, and swivel back and forth like nodding no.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Gregory,
    Thank you for clearing up the difference for me. What kind would you recommend I get for studio use and with the type of camera I have? I also have a telephoto lens (75-300mm) that I might use outside - also with the tripod.
    - Kari L.

    ANSWER 3:
    A pan head will be fine. It's the most common, and if you go to a regular store to buy a tripod, that's what will be on it.
    - Gregory La Grange

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    ANSWER 4:
    I used a tripod with a pan head for years, but after switching to a ball head I now find it much easier to make the fine adjustments to point the lens exactly where I want to. Also, you have only one knob to tighten with a ball head rather than two on a pan head.
    - Bill Boswell

    ANSWER 5:
    I would go with the ball head simply because it is easier to move and adjust, in my opinion. Also worth considering is the pistol grip-type head, my preferred for use in the field. Manfrotto and Slik make one. For me, ANYTHING is better than the old one-two required from the pan head!
    Joe in Norfolk
    - Joe

    ANSWER 6:
    You did not mention how big a lens you will be putting on your camera. It is important to take that into consideration. A ball head that is too weak to hold your lens and body is a poor investment.
    Ball heads are best for me. I use a Bogen tripod that cost approximately $150.00 with a head. It was the best investment I have made.
    I have some real good deals on $90.00 tripods that are not rigid enough for me.
    Bill in Ashtabula
    - Bill Lewis

    ANSWER 7:
    I will be using up to a 75-300mm lens. So it is a bigger lens, and I want a tripod that will support that weight and forward heaviness of the camera. And thank you all so far for your replies. They are very welcome and a lot of help!
    - Kari L.

    ANSWER 8:
    You will probably be happier with the support the standard pan-tilt head offers over the ball-head mount with your camera/lens combination. Unless you spend big bucks, the ball-head types will slip when used with heavier equipment ... especially when you go vertical. The pan-tilt styles may take longer to adjust, but they will support a heavy load more securely.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 9:
    Thank you all very much for your information and help. I just purchased a bogen tripod with 3-way pan head with quick release and have played with it for a bit. It seems to be just what I needed. Your information was very useful in coming to this decision. I think I will be very happy with my choice. Thanks yet again!
    - Kari L.

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    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Broken Dreams
    I have had a Fuji s2pro for a month. It detached itself from the strap and hit the concrete. The prism came out. Is it worth getting fixed, or do I just go away and sob? I love this camera. I have a wedding in N.Z. in two weeks. I am so upset
    - Ellen

    ANSWER 1:
    OUCH! ... I know how you feel. I once had one of my cameras, with a $900 lens, go tumbling end-over-end down a rocky hillside and land in a stream. It hurts a lot at first, but we learn from it and move on.
    Since your camera is only a month old, and "detached itself" from the strap, you may be eligible for a warranty repair. Even if you're not, it would still be wise to get an estimate for repairs. It might not be as bad as you think.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    I am sorry to hear that. If you purchased with a credit card it may offer some coverage. Good luck.
    - Bill Boswell

    ANSWER 3:
    I had my S2 fall off the tripod, and you can guess the rest. Fortunately, I had it insured with a $200 deductible, so the $440 repair wasn't such a bad hit. Go towards seeing if the warranty will cover. As far as the strap, I have my wife sew through the double straps for extra security. Also sometimes the places where you bought it from will loan you a camera free of charge while yours is being repaired. This is a good place for repairs.
    http://www.northwestcamera.com/services.cfm?action=digital
    - Gregg Vieregge

    ANSWER 4:
    I had a similar, but not as devastating, experience with my Fuji FinePix s7000. The first time I took it out, one of the straps detached. It had been on correctly, but slipped off. Fortunately, I was holding it tight and it didn't fall against anything. So I immediately exchanged the cheap leather tongs & tin rings with thicker rings and metal hooks. I feel much safer now. I think it is a Fuji problem.
    - Karrel Buckingham

    See Karrel's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 5:
    Most people have significant money tied up in their camera equipment. So, invariably, you should have insurance covering the replacement cost of all your gear!! Talk to your homeowners insurance agent. Get a rider put on it for your camera gear. I have over $10,000 worth of equipement covered with my rider. It only costs me $160.00 a year, with no dedutible for claims! It doesn't matter how you screw up with a rider, it's covered. Drop it in a lake and can't get it back ... covered ... drop it on the floor and break it ... covered ... etc., etc. It's a must-have and a great piece of mind!!!
    - Heather K. McFarland

    See Heather's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
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    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 3: Can I Get Sharp 10x15 Prints?
    I bought a 28-80mm f3.5-5.6 Aspherical Macro HF lens along with my Canon GII and will be taking some landscape photos in the woods. I've never had one of my photos enlarged to 10x15 and was wondering if this lens would give me the sharpness necessary for this size with say a sharp negative film, such as Impresa 50? Thanks, Jordan
    - Jordan

    ANSWER 1:
    Sorry, I forgot to add that it's a Sigma lens.
    - Jordan

    ANSWER 2:
    I think your prints will enlarge to 10X15 just fine with 50 speed film. A few tips to get the best enlargements with your lens:

  • Don't shoot wide open or with the lens completely stopped down. The middle aperture settings will be sharper.
  • Don't shoot at either extreme with the zoom. The best results will come from somewhere in the middle of the zoom range.
  • Make sure that your focus and exposure are dead-on accurate. Bracket exposures to be sure.
  • Use a tripod.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    Bob, is that true just for landscapes? Or for any type of work with a lens? I'm talking about the shoot mid-range answer.
    - Shirley Pearce

    ANSWER 4:
    Shirley,
    Yes. Typically, zooms will function at their sharpest in the mid-range settings of aperture and focal length. (Even with primes, the sharpest working range will be around f-5.6 to f-8.)
    This is especially true for landscapes, where large reproductions are often the ultimate objective. Any deficiencies in focus and sharpness will be more evident, the more the image is enlarged.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

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