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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, October 25, 2004
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* SPOTLIGHT: Last Call on Special Offer for Jim Miotke's New DVD!
* BETTERPHOTO: Last Call to Sign Up for Short Online PhotoCourses™
* BETTERPHOTO: Book of the Month: Tony Sweet's Fine Art Nature Photography
* BETTERPHOTO: Photo of the Day: A Daily Showcase of Creativity
* FEATURED GALLERY: Focus on Late-Day Light
* FEATURED PLACE: Focus on Washington State
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: What Year Was It? / Word Play
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Living With Your Camera ... By Chris Hansen
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Tripod: Pan Head Vs. Ball Head
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Lighting a Reflective Subject
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Broken Dreams
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Can I Get Sharp 10x15 Prints?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: How to Fire as Fill Flash
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: What to Charge for First Wedding?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Black and White ... With a Dash of Color
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Photographing Indoor Tennis
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Incorrect Skin Tones
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Film Vs. CCD
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: What You See Through The Lens
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Graduated ND Filters: Use, Purchase, Etc.
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Difference ... Nikon Vs. Canon


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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Last Call on Special Offer for Jim Miotke's New DVD!
Learn digital photography in Jim Miotke's entertaining and instructional new DVD, "Digital Photography Unleashed: Capturing Wildly Great Photos." In a Special Limited Edition Offer, pre-order Jim's DVD before it officially hits the streets (October 30th), and receive an autographed, numbered copy (1 of 500) - while supplies last. You will also get this exciting DVD at a special discounted price of $19.95 ($5 less than retail). But there's more! If you order today, you will also get a bonus signed 5 x 7 print of one of Jim's images.

Still can't decide? View the sample trailer and see for yourself the high quality content you can expect on this DVD. Pre-order your copy today. For details, and a link to the trailer, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1256


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 183rd issue of SnapShot!

Hi

"Time is running out" seems to be BetterPhoto's phrase of the week during these final days of October! First, the special offer on my new DVD, "Digital Photography Unleashed: Capturing Wildly Great Photos," will expire when it's officially released on October 30th. For details on this excellent deal - plus, a sample trailer - go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1256

Next, the second round of our 4-Week Short Courses gets under way next week, but the last day to enroll is this Friday, October 29th. These awesome classes include Kerry Drager's "Details and Close-ups" and Brenda Tharp's "Mastering Macro Photography." Read all about them in the item below.

Time is running out, too, on ordering our Book of the Month selection: Tony Sweet's beautiful "Fine Art Nature Photography"; for more information, see below. Also in this issue of SnapShot: Late-day light and Washington state are the subjects of the featured galleries, while BetterPhoto member Chris Hansen checks in with a valuable photo tip.

That's it for now. Have an enjoyable week of photography!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Last Call to Sign Up for Short Online PhotoCourses™
The fall session of BetterPhoto's online classes may be well under way, but the second round of our 4-week Short Courses begins next week! But you'd better hurry: The final day to enroll is this Friday, October 29th. These courses include:

  • Brenda Tharp's "Mastering Macro Photography" (2nd Session):
    http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BRN04.asp

  • Kerry Drager's "Details and Close-ups" (2nd Session):
    http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD05.asp


    *****
    Book of the Month: Tony Sweet's Fine Art Nature Photography
    Our online store showcases the fantastic books and DVDs from our staff of BetterPhoto instructors. Now, each month, we are also putting one of these fine products in the spotlight! Tony Sweet's inspirational (and informational) book, "Fine Art Nature Photography," kicks things off. If you buy this beautiful book before the end of October, you will receive free shipping (to U.S. destinations). Best yet, it's autographed by Tony! For all the details on this October selection, go to:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetailLg.asp?productID=1173


    *****
    Photo of the Day: A Daily Showcase of Creativity
    Our new daily newsletter, Photo of the Day, has been up and running for a week now, and has provided a daily showcase of outstanding pictures! The images are selected from either our monthly photo contest or from the excellent work of our online course instructors. In addition to being inspired by awe-inspiring images each day, subscribers receive brief announcements and occasional photo tips from our team of instructors. To learn more or to subscribe, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp

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    FEATURED GALLERY
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    Focus on Late-Day Light
    Not sure if it's worth the effort to get out and shoot in late afternoon and evening? Check out the work of BetterPhoto instructors and members, and you'll see warm light, long shadows, striking silhouettes, fantastic skies, and the surreal tones of twilight. View BetterPhoto's inspiring "Afternoon and Evening" gallery at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=454

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    FEATURED PLACE
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    Focus on Washington State
    BetterPhoto shooters have captured the great beauty and the great variety of this state in the Northwestern United States. For example, check out the awesome images of the Seattle skyline at sunset, majestic peaks, mountain reflections, the Pacific Coast shoreline, beautiful rural landscapes, assorted city scenes, and more. For ideas and inspiration, go to BetterPhoto's Washington State gallery at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=212

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    PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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    Last week, we asked:
    When was Robert Kennedy Moments After He Was Shot, by Bill Eppridge, photographed?

    The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Kimberly Nisenshal is:
    It was shot in 1968.

    To see all answers to this question, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

    And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Word Play - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

    The word photography is derived from words meaning what?

    Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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    THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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    Living With Your Camera ... By Chris Hansen
    I am in the military and a freelancer for the base newspaper. Job permitting, take your camera with you everywhere you go ... be it work, vacation, or just running errands. Knowing you have your camera with you will cause your artistic eye to be "open" all the time and you'll see the world in a new way.

    Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

    Add Your Own Tip:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
    My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
    • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
    • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
    • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
    You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

    BetterPhoto.com
    P.O. Box 2781
    Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

    To order online, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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    NEW QUESTION 1: Tripod: Pan Head Vs. Ball Head
    I have the Canon EOS Digital Rebel and am looking to start up a photography studio in the future. I am starting to build up my equipment at the moment, while I learn about taking pictures. I need a good tripod but don't want to spend a fortune on one. There are a lot to choose from, and I have narrowed it down to a few that I have in mind. I would be using it for studio shooting mostly. Does anyone know about the Slik Pro 330DX Tripod w/3-way pan/tilt quick release head? It is about $90. That is within reason price for me.
    Also, one of my questions is what is better, pan head or ball head, and what is the difference between the two when it comes to shooting? I keep seeing both of them but don't know about the difference and can't find any info on them to know. So any help would be much appreciated. I am a true beginner at all of this. Thank you!
    - Kari L.

    ANSWER 1:
    A ball head is like the ball and socket joint of your shoulder. You loosen it and you can swivel in all directions.
    A pan head is like what you might commonly expect a tripod to be. You have the two things to loosen to adjust the camera. You can loosen one thing, and only swivel up and down like nodding your head yes. Or loosen just the other, and swivel back and forth like nodding no.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Gregory,
    Thank you for clearing up the difference for me. What kind would you recommend I get for studio use and with the type of camera I have? I also have a telephoto lens (75-300mm) that I might use outside - also with the tripod.
    - Kari L.

    ANSWER 3:
    A pan head will be fine. It's the most common, and if you go to a regular store to buy a tripod, that's what will be on it.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12248

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12248

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 2: Lighting a Reflective Subject
    I need to take shots of gloss-finished ceramic tile to post on a web site. I'm working in my home and need simple lighting techniques. How do I light it to prevent reflections?
    - Chris

    ANSWER 1:
    When you are dealing with highly reflective items, you don't light the object directly. Instead you light what is being reflected in the object back to the camera. The most common and the easiest approach is to put the object in a "light tent." By lighting the tent itself, you can create modeling and yet the item reflects the light sides of the tent so you can see the surfaces.
    You can buy several ready-made ones, or you can easily create one using rolls of paper. A simple PCV pipe framework can be used to hold the paper in position. A hole for the camera lens is all that is needed to make the shot. It looks pretty complex but is actually incredibly simple to do.
    David
    www.ndavidking.com
    - David King

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12245

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12245

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 3: Broken Dreams
    H have had a Fuji s2pro for a month. It detached itself from the strap and hit the concrete. The prism came out. Is it worth getting fixed, or do I just go away and sob? I love this camera. I have a wedding in N.Z. in two weeks. I am so upset
    - Ellen

    ANSWER 1:
    OUCH! ... I know how you feel. I once had one of my cameras, with a $900 lens, go tumbling end-over-end down a rocky hillside and land in a stream. It hurts a lot at first, but we learn from it and move on.
    Since your camera is only a month old, and "detached itself" from the strap, you may be eligible for a warranty repair.
    Even if you're not, it would still be wise to get an estimate for repairs. It might not be as bad as you think.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12238

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12238

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 4: Can I Get Sharp 10x15 Prints?
    I bought a 28-80mm f3.5-5.6 Aspherical Macro HF lens along with my Canon GII and will be taking some landscape photos in the woods. I've never had one of my photos enlarged to 10x15 and was wondering if this lens would give me the sharpness necessary for this size with say a sharp negative film, such as Impresa 50? Thanks, Jordan
    - Jordan

    ANSWER 1:
    Sorry, I forgot to add that it's a Sigma lens.
    - Jordan

    ANSWER 2:
    I think your prints will enlarge to 10X15 just fine with 50 speed film. A few tips to get the best enlargements with your lens:
  • Don't shoot wide open or with the lens completely stopped down. The middle aperture settings will be sharper.
  • Don't shoot at either extreme with the zoom. The best results will come from somewhere in the middle of the zoom range.
  • Make sure that your focus and exposure are dead-on accurate. Bracket exposures to be sure.
  • Use a tripod.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12231

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12231

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 5: How to Fire as Fill Flash
    I have a Canon Digital Rebel and Canon 550EX Speedlight - and I am an amateur photographer. I am frustrated with trying to learn how to get the flash to fire as fill flash (example: in the shaded woods on a cloudy day). When I am in program mode, the camera sets the shutter speed too slow for a handheld shot and the flash does not fire at all. My knowledge of lighting techniques is rather limited, and I was hoping that there would be some sort of semi-automatic way to get this flash to fire for some simple portraits in the middle of this glorious foliage. Suggestions and help is very appreciated. Thanks, Jen
    - Jennifer Salvon

    ANSWER 1:
    I think you're expecting your flash to work like the pop-up flash with the mode dial set to the green box. Check the manual about whether it has flash power compensation settings.
    For non-dedicated flashes, you can get good fill settings with setting a flash on auto to an aperture that's smaller numerically than the aperture that the lens is at for the picture you're going to take.
    Or by using the distance scale if on manual.
    The settings concerning a speedlite working with Canon cameras is usually explained in the flash manual.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    When a EX flash is mounted on a EOS camera (film or digital), turned on and fully charged, you should see a flash symbol when you half press the shutter release. If the sync speed is too high or other reason that the flash cannot be fired, you will see the flash symbol blinks. As long as you see the steady flash symbol, the flash should fire. If you do not see the symbol in the viewfinder when half press the shutter release, then you may have a problem. First, make sure the flash is pushed all the way in and that it is locked down tight. Also make sure the flash is fully charged (the red light on the flash is on and steady). Since you are using a 550EX for regular use, make sure the master/slave switch is in the "off" position. Another way to test is to set your camera's mode dial to "M", turn the control dial to set the shutter speed to below 1/90. Press the shutter and see if the flash fire. That's all I can think of. Hope it helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 3:
    Jennifer,
    You have gotten some good advice from both Gregory and Andy.
    A fill flash is two to two and one-half stops less than your exposure. Here are some other ideas. I checked on the Canon Web site about your flash. They mention that you have a three-stop control over the exposure + or -. Your camera may allow you the same. As an experiment tomorrow take an 18-percent gray card, and tripod with you to take some test photos. Use your gray card to set your exposure. Make sure you have a good histogram. Now shoot one with your flash. Then dial in a negative (-) two-stop reduction of your flash. See what the histogram tells you. Do not, let me repeat that, do not use your LED monitor. If two didn't do it, then try three. Remember, you can also change the camera's exposure.
    Finally, if all else fails, use a white handkerchief over the flash head. This will cut down of the amount of light your flash is sending out. You can also use vellum which you can buy at an art or drafting store.
    Hope these ideas help.
    Good shooting
    Doug

    - Doug Elliott

    ANSWER 4:
    I've had the same frustration as you. I have a Digital Rebel and the 540 EZ flash. Since the EZ models won't work in Auto Mode with the Rebel, I set the flash to manual, the camera to manual OR shutter priority (I think the flash sync is 1/250 or slower), with an exposure for the available area.
    Since the 500 series flashes have a wonderful manual adjustment from full power - 1/132 (I think), AND you have immediate viewing with digital, you can shoot, view and adjust the fill flash to your liking. As long as you keep the SAME DISTANCE and SAME EXPOSURE setting, you should have results that you like.
    Good luck!!!
    - Tony Peckman

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12228

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12228

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 6: What to Charge for First Wedding?
    I have recently been asked by a new friend to shoot her wedding in December. She knows that I am an amateur but has seen my work, loves it, and is willing to "take a chance on me". Everyone has to start somewhere, and I feel that for what she is looking for I can do a good job. My question is what to charge her? Do any of you remember what you charged in your early years? Should I phone around to the local photographers to see what the going rate is, then half that? Do I charge by the hour? I also plan on doing some digital manipulation {collages, fading, hand tinting, etc.}. So I need to take my computer work into consideration. Also, do I offer all photos (which turned out}, OR a disk, or both? ANY suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    Blessings
    Teri in Canada
    - Teri F. Inman

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Teri ...
    My first wedding was a situation where my sister's friend was on a budget, really liked my pictures, and needed a photographer. With my limited knowledge of what was involved, we settled on $300 for 6 hours and 100 4x6's of her choice. She chose to proof all of her images on a CD (this saved me some money), and I had prices set for re-orders for the other sizes. Well, 6 hours ended up being 10 on the day of the wedding and, like you, I did digital work on a lot of the pictures ... so post-wedding was at least 30 hours of work. It didn't cost me any money out of pocket, but I donated soooooo much time that I hadn't figured in to the job.
    I gave her the deal because of who she was and the fact I had never photographed a wedding exclusively. Since then, my prices have gone up, as well as my experience and skill. I wouldn't trade that experience for anything ... Despite the stress and all, I loved doing it.
    - Lori Carpenter

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12224

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12224

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 7: Black and White ... With a Dash of Color
    I have Photoshop Elements. How can I get pictures that are black and white and have a little bit a color?
    - Oscar R. Nunuez

    ANSWER 1:
    I assume you want to add a "spot" of color, rather than a tonal effect. Go into the Main Menu and search on "Hawser." That will bring up one of my entries in this month's contest.
    I used the Magic Lasso in Photoshop Elements 1.0 to select the single line of rope. Then I went to Enhance>Variations and clicked on "More Red" until I got the shading I wanted."
    - John Sandstedt

    ANSWER 2:
    In Photoshop, I create two layers of the file. Set the top photo to black and white/desaturate, then reduce the amount of transparency until the amount of color you want comes through.
    If you're only wanting a section of the photo to have color, then apply a mask and paint/reveal the portion with a gray color (the darker or lighter the gray, the more or less of the photo will show through).
    - Lorrie A. Prothero

    ANSWER 3:
    If you have a color photo:open photo, duplicate layer, desaturate, erase where you want color (the original color comes through), flatten layer and save!
    - Traci D. Brumley

    ANSWER 4:
    Oscar,
    I don't know if this will help or not, but I have Photoshop Elements 2.0. If you go to the "How To" tab (it would be at the top right of my program) and then go to "Fun Stuff", one of your options should be "Color a Black and White Photo". I used this and it was very simple to follow the directions. I would imagine that your program should have something similar, or you could try going to your "Help" section. Hope this helps.
    (Note, I started with a black and white photo when I did it.)
    - Kari L.

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12201

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12201

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 8: Photographing Indoor Tennis
    My son plays tennis inside. I used the Nikon N80 with the 70-200 VR lens. I used F2.8 and 1/125 sec and ISO 800 film. There was some natural light coming in through the skylights but not enough to get a faster shutter speed. Can you give me any suggestions as to how to get a better photo. I have a SB-800 flash unit but it is new and I have no idea how to use it. Should I buy ISO 1600 film, underexpose the ISO 800 one stop, and hope the lab can fix it or take my chances with the new flash. If I underexpose one stop, would 1/250 sec still show the ball with a weird shape.
    Thanks.
    - Sherri McGee

    See Sherri's Premium BetterPholio™

    See Sample Photo - Too much blurr:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=580893

    ANSWER 1:
    I don't think that 1/250 second would be fast enough. You would likely need 1/500 second or faster to freeze a speeding tennis ball, and I doubt if the available light will permit this.
    Your best bet is to use the flash. >In your scenario, an electronic flash burst is fast enough to freeze everything.
    Try to familiarize yourself with the unit and shoot a test roll or two to get used to how it operates in automatic and manual modes.
    If the unit is "dedicated", just set your camera to maximum flash sync speed and it should automatically deliver the correct amount of light to match the aperture you've selected on your lens.
    I too am often intimidated when using flash and find ambient light more "manageable", but there are times when flash is necessary.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Thanks, Bob. I will try using the flash. His game is Saturday, so I won't have time to practice. I will read the manual tomorrow and hope for the best. I only photograph Matt warming up, so hopefully the flash won't bother him too much. My flash is dedicated. Nikon's new SB-800 flash. The max sync speed on my camera is 1/125 sec. Is this fast enough?
    - Sherri McGee

    See Sherri's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    1/125 flash sync should work, but on really fast action, you may experience some "ghosting" ... when the action which occurs after (or before) the flash fires is recorded on the film. In your scenario, you should be OK though, as it will be barely noticeable.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12196

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12196

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 9: Incorrect Skin Tones
    I'm not sure what the reason is, but I can have barns, sunsets, rainbows, etc., processed and be happy with the color. When it comes to people, I am constantly having to have them re-printed to remove "yellow" or "red". I used to think the yellow was an indoor/florescent thing, but it also happens in outdoor sittings. I am using an N-80 w/SB50DX on a Stratos with omnibounce. The clothing is accurate, just not the skin tones. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    - Diane T. Phillips

    ANSWER 1:
    Diane, you didn't say how you were having your film processed, but first I'd make sure it was going to a good professional lab. Often consumer labs print toward the warm side because most people think it is more flattering. Then, do a quick test. On the first frame of a series, include a Kodak 18-percent gray card in the scene and make it a MAJOR part of the frame. Tell the lab it is there and have them print for neutral gray on that card and use the same settings for the rest of the roll.
    It is strange that the other colors are "accurate" though. Sunsets and such are often better when warmer but the clothing ought to show the same color cast as the skin. You didn't mention what film you were using but if you are using negative film try one of Kodak's 'Portra' series and see if the problem continues.
    David
    www.ndavidking.com
    - David King

    ANSWER 2:
    Thank you for your suggestions! I am using Kodak 400 Hi Definition Film. Most of my work is done outdoors in different areas of exposure to light. I've heard of gray cards, but not sure how to use one. If I use the card to get a reading, would I need to do that each time we change locations? I generally move around a park taking different poses. I've tried processing with every place in my area. (very rural). Most of them send out to a lab called Qualex, some use a Fuji lab.
    - Diane T. Phillips

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12189

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12189

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 10: Film Vs. CCD
    Every time lately that I have opened a magazine I see articles about how to get the colors of a digital picture to look the same printed as they do on your monitor, and how to get the monitor to show the same colors as your camera recorded them. Most of these are in depth and are quite technical. With all these "extra" steps why even bother going digital?
    - Terry M. Gunderson

    ANSWER 1:
    Because you can print all of your photos at home the way you want them - not the way a tech at the photo lab thinks you want them.
    - George F. Howard

    Visit georgefhoward.com - George's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Not everybody has to do that. But if it's an extra step that you're worried about, we always have choices. Just do what you have a use for and what you have fun with.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12185

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12185

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 11: What You See Through The Lens
    I'm new to the world of photography ... but would be more excited if the image I saw through the viewfinder was the same as print. I have a Canon Rebel Ti, and when I get my prints back there is always "extra" in the print that I did not see when I composed the pic. Please look at the 2 pix. The 1st is the print, 2nd is the cropped version I TRIED to achieve on film. Please disregard slant, I didn't see that when I took the picture :-) Also I did not use flash, so forgive the shadow - I'm still learning.
    - Marquee Smith

    ANSWER 1:
    Most SLRs like the Rebel Ti have a viewfinder that shows about 90 percent of the image captured on the film frame. Usually (but not always) this pretty closely matches the prints you get back from high volume and 1-hour labs, since they are set up to give about the same crop. Printing the entire frame would require manually adjusting for each frame. Similarly, if you shoot slides, the plastic/cardboard mount tends to overlap the image somewhat.
    Only the most expensive professional-level SLRs, such as EOS 1v, Nikon F5, etc. have 100 percent viewfinders.
    With your camera, you can:
    (a) Realize that you're getting a little more on each side of the viewfinder and accordingly adjust how you frame the scene.
    (b) Simply trim the print you get from the lab to get the crop you want.
    (c) Scan the negative or print, and edit them digitally to get the crop you want.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12183

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 12: Graduated ND Filters: Use, Purchase, Etc.
    I need help buying a graduated neutral-density filter. What type is best: round or rectangular with a holder.
    Also, please advise what I need to use a rectangular filter. Which type is best, and how does one use graduated nd filter to properly expose bright and darker foreground photos? Thanks.
    - Paul D. Carter

    ANSWER 1:
    The round ones that screw onto the end of your lens are certainly easier and more convenient, but they are not as diverse as the rectangular ones that require a holder. The round, screw-on types have the line of graduation in the middle of the frame so you are pretty much limited compositionally.
    With the others, you can position the horizon higher or lower as the need may arise.

    To use any graduated ND filter, you should first meter the scene without the filter in place.
    Take a reading off the shadow areas (the foreground, if shooting a landscape, which includes a brightly lit sky). Then, attach the filter with the darkest portion covering the brightest part of the scene (the sky), and take the shot.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12173

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    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Difference ... Nikon Vs. Canon
    I've been looking through all the pictures here. And they all mostly taken by Canon cameras. And reviews are crazy about Canon product. So I guess my question is: IS NIKON ANY GOOD?
    - Pavel Zhurakovskiy

    ANSWER 1:
    Yeah ... Nikons are good. But keep in mind that ANY camera can only be as good as the photographer behind it.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    I agree with Bob. There has been a long debate about which manufacturer is best. For years, Nikon's lenses were the Cadillacs. I've read many reports indicating Canon is in the lead in the auto-focus "system" with the EOS line.

    A camera is what the photographer makes of it. S/he should feel comfortable using it (ergonomics) and be able to use all its features easily.
    - John Sandstedt

    ANSWER 3:
    I agree with both Bob and John; it is the Ford vs. Chevy, PC vs. Mac argument all over again. Both do the same things and do them well.
    Nikon was in there first and achieved a major reputation for workhorse, bullet-proof gear for the professional with every bell and whistle imaginable. And Nikkor glass was on a par with the best European lenses. Canon leapt into the scene and has given them a run for the money at every turn. They actually leapt ahead with the first serious DSLR, the D30 while Nikon was still thinking about it.
    For most old-timers, it is as much a matter of ergonomics as it is functionality. The cameras "feel" different in your hands. If you were comfortable with one brand, and had a collection of accessories for it, you stayed with it even as things moved into the digital world because the cameras still, to me, feel different. I've shot Nikons professionally since my first F body and see no reason to switch. But that's not because I don't like Canons; I think they are great cameras; I just continue to like the feel of the Nikons better because I am used to it.
    David- David King

    ANSWER 4:
    I agree with David in the "feel" of the camera. I started off with a Canon years ago. But when I began investing into pro equipment, I decided to go with the Nikons. Now I have an F100 SLR and a D100 digital SLR. Both are fantastic cameras. The only down side that I have found is that the buffer on the D100 is too small to take advantage of shooting RAW images. But, I'm willing to live with that since I rarely shoot RAW these days anyway.

    Nikkor has a wide variety of glass and you can easily use Sigma as a cheaper substitute (although I choose not to, being so big on Nikon). I've had colleagues tell me that you have a slightly more limited selection in Canon glass, though I don't think it would be that limited.
    - Tiffany L. Cochran

    ANSWER 5:
    Probably the main reason a lot of photos seem to take with Canon is that every store that sells cameras carries Canon. I have never paid much attention to price but they are probably a little cheaper than Nikon. Don't forget Pentax while you're looking either. All three are fine cameras, and as Bob said, any camera can only be as good as the photographer
    - Scott Pedersen

    ANSWER 6:
    To prove the point that it is more than the camera, Ansel Adams would take wonderful pictures with a pinhole camera. Its not the camera its the person behind the camera.
    - John Sargent

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=12097

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=12097

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