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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, October 04, 2004
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* SPOTLIGHT: Fall Online PhotoCourses™ Launch on Wednesday!
* BETTERPHOTO: Get a Photographic Jump-Start with a Beginning Course!
* BETTERPHOTO: Zero in on BetterPhoto's Specialty Courses
* BETTERPHOTO: Fantastic Offer on Jim Miotke's Exciting New DVD!
* FEATURED GALLERY: Focusing on Funny People and Cute Kids!
* FEATURED PLACE: Focusing on the U.S. Southwest: New Mexico
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Movie Time / Tale of Two Men
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Stock Photography: Maximize Your Efforts ... By Charlie Borland
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Legal Question: Deceased Photographers
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Tops of Photos Getting Cut Off
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Question About the Nikon N80
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Shooting Sunsets
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Sharp Subject, Blurred Background
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Problems with Unsharp Images
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Graniness of Fast Film Speeds
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Holiday Cards
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Dark Backgrounds
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: What Film Speed?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Bad Sports Shots/Canon Rebel 2000
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Lens for Soccer Action
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: Indoor Volleyball Shots
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 14: Shooting Sports Photography
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 15: Drop Shadows to Prevent Good Printing?
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Panoramic Composition


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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Fall Online PhotoCourses™ Launch on Wednesday!
This is the season for a burst of photographic excitement and creativity, but time is getting short. A number of BetterPhoto's online classes are already filled to the brim, and still others are nearing capacity. All the same, there are spots left in many courses. Although the first lesson goes out this Wednesday (October 6th), you still have time to sign up! With so many great teachers and so many fantastic classes (including many new ones for fall), we have the perfect course for you. To aid in the decision-making process, take a look at our course categories page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 180th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

What an exciting week at BetterPhoto.com! The big news, of course, is that the fall round of online photo classes gets started this Wednesday (October 6th). With so many fantastic classes - including a number of new ones - this is our best schedule yet! There's still time to join the fun. For details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp

In this issue of SnapShot, instructor and stock-photography expert Charlie Borland discusses how to maximize your photographic efforts; read his photo tip below. Also, don't miss the special offer on my new DVD, "Digital Photography Unleashed: Capturing Wildly Great Photos." The Featured Gallery this week puts the spotlight on lighthearted moments with people, while the Featured Place focuses on the U.S. Southwest - specifically, New Mexico. Finally, once again, we have a terrific batch of questions and answers.

That's it for now. Have a great week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Get a Photographic Jump-Start with a Beginning Course!
Would you really like to get a handle on the basics of photography? Although Jim Miotke's immensely popular online course, Beginning Photography, is full, two excellent guest instructors have stepped in to teach separate sections. These classes make use of Jim's lessons, but instructors Vik Orenstein and Jay Forman will be critiquing photos and answering questions. Further details:

Beginning Photography with guest instructor Vik Orenstein:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/VIK05.asp

Beginning Photography with guest instructor Jay Forman:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JAY02.asp

For information on all BetterPhoto courses, go to our new skill-levels page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/skill.asp


*****
Zero in on BetterPhoto's Specialty Courses
One of BetterPhoto's online-course specialties involves ... well ... specialty courses. And we have such an inspiring lineup of classes from such an inspiring group of instructors. For example, consider these exciting offerings:

Kathleen T. Carr's "Polaroid Image and Emulsion Transfers":
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KAT01.asp

Brenda Tharp's "Beyond the Postcard: Creating Memorable Travel Images":
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BRN02.asp

For details on all of BetterPhoto's courses, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


*****
Fantastic Offer on Jim Miotke's Exciting New DVD!
Learn digital photography in Jim Miotke's entertaining and instructional new DVD, "Digital Photography Unleashed: Capturing Wildly Great Photos." In a Special Limited Edition Offer, pre-order Jim's DVD before it officially hits the streets (October 30th), and receive an autographed, numbered copy (1 of 500) - while supplies last. You will also get the DVD at a special discounted price of $19.95 ($5 less than retail). But there's more! If you order today, you will also get a bonus signed 5 x 7 print of one of Jim's images. These DVDs are selling quick! Pre-order your copy today at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1256

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FEATURED GALLERY
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Focusing on Funny People and Cute Kids!
People are one of the favorite subjects for BetterPhoto members and instructors. And that's especially true when it comes to capturing lighthearted moments involving people. In fact, just about anything goes when it comes to the pursuit of humorous circumstances, whimsical moments, cute children in cute situations, and all-around general wackiness. The scenes can be candid or posed, the people young or old. The only prerequisites for the photographer: Keep a camera handy, and be ready to capture the moment ... since some of these scenes won't stay put for very long! View BetterPhoto's gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=366

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FEATURED PLACE
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Focusing on the U.S. Southwest: New Mexico
New Mexico's tourism department bills its state as the "Land of Enchantment." A very appropriate description, but check out the work of BetterPhoto instructors and members and you'll see for yourself. To see the grand landscapes, wildlife, people, fall color, and even Albuquerque's hot air balloon festival, go to BetterPhoto's New Mexico gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=1013

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
What brand of camera does Richard Dreyfuss use to photograph Madeleine Stowe during the first night of his Stakeout with Emilio Estevez?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Ossain Raggi is:
The camera was a Pentax LX.

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Tale of Two Men - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

Who are the two men photographed on the cover of American Photography: A Century of Images?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Stock Photography: Maximize Your Efforts ... By Charlie Borland
When you are shooting images for stock photography, you need to shoot for all potential uses that a client may want. The first simple rule with all your stock shooting is to shoot both horizontal and vertical. Place your subject at the top, at the bottom, on the left side of the frame, and on the right. Zoom in tight, then back off for a wider view. Get down low, get up high. Always look at all angles and for opportunities to create space where copy or a logo can be placed. I always shoot a few placing the subject on the right side of the vertical frame, leaving room for a magazine headline. Cover your bases with all the possibilities you can think of.

Take Charlie Borland's online course:
Stock Photography

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:

  • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
  • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
  • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Legal Question: Deceased Photographers
I'm a writer who occasionally photographs the subjects about which I'm writing, but I know very little thus far about the legalities of this end of the business. I'm currently writing the biography of a jazz pianist and archiving his memorabilia for the estate. In these files, I've found several dozen excellent photographs, mostly 8x10 prints and most of which have never been published.
Several of them were taken by photographers who are no longer living, and thus far, I have been unable to find any information about their estates in order to request permission to use them in the book. Some of these photos are magnificent, and I hate the idea of them sitting in a file and never seen by the public just because I can't nail down who holds the copyright.
1) Is there some handy resource I'm overlooking that would help me track down the estates of these photographers, besides the Internet, which has turned up nothing?
2) If I have exhausted and documented all reasonable attempts to identify the estates and contact them for permission, is it acceptable to claim fair use, run the photos, and credit the pianist's estate for providing them to me for publication? I've seen estates credited before but don't know the circumstances behind those credits.
3) Some of the photos were taken at a taping of "The Dinah Shore Show" in about 1965. It is clear that they were taken by an anonymous friend or family member of the musician(s), not by an NBC staffer. Therefore, I'm assuming that I don't need to contact NBC to use them even though they were shot at a televised event. Is that correct?
- Todd S. Jenkins

See Todd's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
If you're doing this professionally - with the goal of having this book published - you really should contact a copyright attorney.
- Jon Close

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11873

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11873

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*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Tops of Photos Getting Cut Off
Hi all,
I've been noticing lately that the tops of my digital pics are getting cut off when I have the photos printed. When I asked the man at Ritz why this was happening, he explained that digital cameras save photos in more of a square shape, so when you try to print a 4x6, the top (or bottom) will get cut off. My questions:

1) Is this true?
2) I'm thinking of getting the Digital Rebel ... will the same thing happen with a Digital SLR??
Thanks!
- Seth

ANSWER 1:
It may be that the photos are being stretched to fit the frame.
Digital camera photos are not the same shape as those of a 35mm camera (because the ccd is a different shape), but you should still be able to get them printed without the heads being cut off, though.
- Naomi Williams

ANSWER 2:
Most digi-cameras have sensors in 4:3 format, which exactly matches traditional TVs and computer monitors. Enlarged, a full-frame print is 4.5" x 6", so that to get a 4x6 print, 1/2" is cropped off.
35mm film and digital SLRs like the Digital Rebel record images in 3:2 format, which give 4x6 prints without cropping. On the other hand, this format has considerable cropping in 8x10 images - 2" cropped from a full-frame 8" x 12", where the 4:3 format loses only 2/3" from the full-frame 8" x 10.66".
- Jon Close

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11862

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11862

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*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Question About the Nikon N80
I recently purchased a Nikon N80. I'm a little (OK, a lot) intimidated with it. I'm finding that I'm having problems focusing and taking an exposure. Let's say I'm standing in front of my subject, say 1 foot away. When I press the shutter, the camera goes back and forth (or rather the lens) for some reason and doesn't let me take the picture. What am I doing wrong? I hope I've made sense of the situation.
- Juliette Colpa-Thomas

See Juliette's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Check your lens' minimum focusing distance. Usually it's about 3 feet and beyond. If you set your focus in manual, it will let you take the shot even though the subject is out of focus. Hope this helps.
- Andy Szeto

ANSWER 2:
Helps a lot. Thanks Andy!
- Juliette Colpa-Thomas

See Juliette's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Hi there- I too have a Nikon N80 and I found it quite intimidating when I first got it. I have found the manual to be EXTREMELY helpful though. I started out following the instructions for your basic "point and shoot" that were at the beginning and then slowly delved into the manual and special functions. I noticed though that if you have the camera set to auto focus (which is what your camera is trying to do when the lens appears to be moving back and forth), sometimes it has trouble getting and keeping a picture in focus (depending on the distance from the subject and how many items are in the picture at various distances). That's why it won't let you take the picture- it's still trying to focus. Switch to manual focus (turn around and look at the front of the camera, its on the lower right side of the lens) and you can see if you can get it in focus that way.
- Shauna

ANSWER 4:
Hi Julie: It's nice "seeing" you on the general BP site! Andy and Shauna have already shared some excellent advice - in fact, my thoughts exactly. But I just wanted to add that I also own an N80 ... and have found it to be such a terrific camera! The N80 compares very favorably with Nikon's longtime top-of-the-line film camera, the F5. The two cameras share many of the same features (though not all, of course) ... but the N80 checks in at such a far lower price and at a far lower weight.
Keep sticking with it, Julie - i.e., shooting, experimenting, reading the manual, perhaps asking further questions, and then repeating the process - and you'll soon find your N80 comfort level rapidly rising to a high level!
Kerry
- Kerry Drager

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Visit Kerry Drager's Web Site - KerryDrager.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
Point, Think, and Shoot: Beyond the Snapshot
Field Techniques: Light and Composition
4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups
4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups (2nd Session)

ANSWER 5:
Thank you, Shauna and Kerry! I told myself that I would go out and take a roll or two with the N80 (I also have a Nikon N65, which I am very comfortable with but now want to get comfortable with the N80) but didn't get the chance. It makes sense that it's a distance issue. At the time of taking (or trying) the picture I was right on top of the subject. I will follow everyone's advice this evening. Thanks again.
- Juliette Colpa-Thomas

See Juliette's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11836

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11836

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Shooting Sunsets
I have a Nikon N-80 with sb-80 flash. Can I take pictures of the sunset using auto, or will the pictures not turn out? And how do I take sunset pictures?
- Robin M. Misner

ANSWER 1:
If the "auto" you are referring to is auto-EXPOSURE ... try to lock the exposure setting onto a blue portion of the sky to the right or left of the sun (without the sun in the viewfinder).
Then, using that setting, recompose to include the sun in the frame if you want. (This is best accomplished in full-manual mode, though.)
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11833

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11833

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Sharp Subject, Blurred Background
I have seen photos in which it seems that there are two different focus points - one end of a zoom range to the other - as in some sports. The subject is in sharp focus with the background out of focus. How is this scene set up?
- Steve McCroskey

See Steve's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
I think that you are confusing focusing with depth of field. A lot of sport photos are shot with telephoto lens at large apertures (F4.0), giving a shallow depth of field so that only a short distance in front and behind the focused object is sharp.
- John Tomley

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11824

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11824

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Problems with Unsharp Images
I recently purchased the Canon Digital Rebel. I am somewhat disappointed in this camera. I have read all about the problems everyone has had with underexposure, but I am also having problems with images that lack the crispness that I have always had with film. I was hoping to replace my Elan 7e with the Dig Rebel, but almost wish I hadn't bought it!! I am using a tripod and a cable release, but still notice lack of crispness around the eyes in my portraits, I have noticed that it does better close-ups than anything else. I use a Canon 28-105 lens and the one that came in the kit, and have similar results. Am I just expecting too much from digital, or is something else my problem? Please shed some light on this for me!!
- Tammy L. Odell

See Tammy's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
I don't have a digital SLR, but from what I've read, most incorporate a low-pass filter in front of the sensor to reduce moire and other digital artifacts. This filter also tends to make images appear "soft" but that correction comes in editing. See:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/digitalphotography/learnmore/sharpening.mspx.
I could be wrong, but I believe you can also do some adjustment "in-camera" by adjusting the Processing Parameters (p. 55-56 of the user manual), especially Contrast and Sharpness.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
Thanks so much, Jon! That does seem to be the problem I am having. If I can figure out how to do this in PS 7, that would be wonderful. Thanks so much!!
- Tammy L. Odell

See
Tammy's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
As Jon mentioned, you can sharpen the image by adjusting the parameters if you are shooting JPEG. If you shoot RAW, the sharpening can take place either in the Adobe Camera Raw converter or in Photoshop itself. If you are interested in learning the best ways to sharpen in Photoshop, then I spend a whole lesson on sharpening in Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop - Toolbox 2. I give you some actions that will sharpen the detail around the eyes without sharpening the smooth skin on a face.
If you are interested in learning about sharpening in Camera Raw I teach that in Toolbox #3!
- Lewis Kemper

See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Lewis Kemper:
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #1
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #2
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #3

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11819

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11819

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Graniness of Fast Film Speeds
If I am shooting a low-light situation and using a fast film speed such as 1600, how does this effect the graininess of the pictures? Can I enlarge to an 8x10 or 11x14 without any problems?
- Sandra S. Beyers

ANSWER 1:
Sandra, 1600 film will produce very grainy images for the most part that will make the photos difficult to enlarge and still retain decent clarity. If you have Photoshop or Elements, you can do some post-processing to eliminate some of the graininess, or try using the Neat Image or Noise Ninja noise reduction software. While they may reduce the graininess, these programs also might reduce the sharpness of the image as well. Are you using an SLR where you could possibly utilize a faster lens or add a flash (not the on-camera flash)? That may enable you to use 800 ISO film, which would significantly reduce the noise/grain. Good luck!
- Carol Brill

Visit brilliantproductionz.com - Carol's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
I am using an SLR and do have an added flash. I don't understand what constitutes a "faster lens". I have a 28-80 and a 75-300. These are my primary lenses. Can you explain?
- Sandra S. Beyers

ANSWER 3:
I'm talking about the f-stop value on the lens. For instance, I had a Canon 75-300mm 4.5/5.6 zoom that had an aperture of 4.5 at 75mm, but when zoomed out to 300 had an aperture of 5.6. Faster lenses have a lower f-stop number (i.e., the Canon 70-200mm 2.8L has an aperture of 2.8 at both the 70 and 200mm ends), which let in more light and thus can reduce the ISO of the film you need to shoot with.
- Carol Brill

Visit brilliantproductionz.com - Carol's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
Thank you so much, Carol. I had learned that in one of my courses years ago, but forgotten how that worked. Thanks again!
- Sandra S. Beyers

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11814

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11814

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: Holiday Cards
I would like to know, if and where, you can get digital images printed on holiday greeting cards.
- Dennis W. Mcclain

ANSWER 1:
I don't know where you live, but I've found it available at Wal-Mart, Photolab (Loblaws), Shutterfly, probably Ofoto too. Do a search on Google for something in your country.
- Diane L. Dupuis-Kallos

See Diane's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Also check out www.cafepress.com if you want your images printed on a folded card. They do a great job, although you will have to "open" a free store and then buy from yourself (which is real easy).
- Lewis Kemper

See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Lewis Kemper:
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #1
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #2
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #3

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11813

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11813

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*****


NEW QUESTION 9: Dark Backgrounds
I recently went to a football match, which was played at night. I took a lot of photos, but although the players stood out, the background was dark and blurred. I was wondering if anyone knew how to solve this. The camera I used was a Fujifilm Zoom Date 125s, which is also the one I plan to use in future if I could get advice on how to get clear coloured backgrounds. Any help appreciated.
- KYLIE MCDERMOTT

ANSWER 1:
You can't create light if there isn't enough. Your camera's flash probably isn't strong enough, and unless the field is super well lit, you may be out of luck. Why don't you upload an example? As long as we can see the players clearly, it may be OK.
- Diane L. Dupuis-Kallos

See Diane's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11812

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11812

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*****


NEW QUESTION 10: What Film Speed?
I am going to be traveling to Belize and want to bring home beautiful pictures! What speed film should I use? I will be on the beach where it is bright and sunny, and also in the jungle where the sun is diffused through the foliage.
- Marianne M. Douglas

ANSWER 1:
Try a slow slide film for your beach scenes. Fuji Velvia (50 or 100 ASA/ISO) will bring out the richness in the colors of the sand, water, and sky. Fuji Provia (or Sensia) 100 will look more natural than Velvia, but avoid shooting into the sun as these films tend to create a "halo" of a bright sun.
The same speed films can be used in diffused light for jungle scenics, but use a tripod since you'll need slower shutter speeds.
If you are trying to capture wildlife in the jungle, you may have to go with a faster film ... (400 ASA).
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Marianne,
Bob is correct. Also, make sure you have airport security hand check all your film. I would like to add a couple of suggestions for your trip:
Take some baggies for rain protection; protect your lens with UV filters from rain and sea spray. Take lens hoods and a polarizing filter. Pack your tripod and a bean bag to rest our camera on when you’re in areas that do not allow the use of a tripod. A bean bag over the back of a pew works great in churches. In the jungle, take along a monopod for support, and your macro and your longest lens. If it was me, I would have my entire bag, which I own lens from 15mm to 200mm with a 105 macro. Lens cleaning fluid and tissues and, of course, plenty of batteries. Of course, take more film than you think you will ever use -if you return with any unexposed film, store it in your freezer.
Hope these ideas help. Good shooting.
Doug

- Doug Elliott

ANSWER 3:
Shoot slides if you want slides. If you want prints right away, shoot print film.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11802

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11802

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*****


NEW QUESTION 11: Bad Sports Shots/Canon Rebel 2000
I have a Canon Rebel 2000, Sigma Hyper Zoom lens. I love to shoot football pics ... 5-7pm. I used Kodak 200 and 400 film. I used Program setting. The pics are blurred, not crisp even on the focused ones. I am afraid of 800 film because of graininess. Any help?
- Amie

ANSWER 1:
Your lens's maximum aperture is either f/5.6 or f/6.3. The resulting shutter speed (with ISO 200/400 film) is too slow to stop motion or camera shake. Grain or no grain, 800 or 1600 film is the least-expensive solution. The only other way to get faster shutter speeds is to invest in an expensive f/2.8 telephoto lens. Or buy a high power accessory flash, and be on the sideline so that you're within the flash's useful range.
- Jon Close

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11800

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NEW QUESTION 12: Lens for Soccer Action
What is the best lens to use for soccer action shots? Also, would I need to use a tripod?
- LAURIE HANDLEY

ANSWER 1:
Lens choice will depend upon how close you can get to the action. A good zoom lens that covers the 80-200 mm range might be your best option if you are shooting from the sidelines or from the seats closest to the field.
A tripod probably will not help much, since you'll need a fast shutter speed to freeze the athletes anyway, so camera shake shouldn't be an issue.
Just try to keep your shutter speeds at 1/250 second or faster.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Using the tripod is only necessary IF you will take photos in really low light and switching the shutter speed to something below 1/60. (Best to use FAST FILM - i.e., ISO 400 or ISO 800, if the tripod is additional bulk for you). Suggested zoom lenses? In Canon, AF-EF lenses 55-200mm, 75-300mm would be appropriate. Nikon 80-400VR or 80-200mm, while in Minolta 75-300mm or 80-200mm APO Super HS are superb AF lenses.
- Buddy Purugganan

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
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NEW QUESTION 13: Indoor Volleyball Shots
I recently purchased a AF Nikkor 80-200mm 2.8 D lens for my Nikon D100 to shoot indoor volleyball. The first try out of the box was disappointing. I tried to shoot pictures in aperture priority mode, ISO 400 and 500, AF turned on. My shots were all blurred! I also tried to handhold this because the monopod was uncomfortable to me (also brand new). Any suggestions ... I know it's a user error and not the equipment.
- Judy

ANSWER 1:
Was it the action of the players that was blurred, or the whole image?
If it was just the players, try selecting a wider aperture when using aperture-priority mode. This will allow for a faster shutter speed and help to freeze the action.
(You can also set the shutter speed at 1/500 second, and use shutter-priority mode and get the same result.) You may have to increase the ISO setting if the lighting is dim.
If the entire scene was blurry, it is also due to a slow shutter and camera-shake during the hand-held exposures. A faster shutter speed will remedy this.
- Bob Cammarata

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ANSWER 2:
All the shots were blurry. I'll try a faster shutter speed and see if it helps. Thanks, Judy
- Judy

ANSWER 3:
Judy,
Increase your ISO to 800 or 1600. Use an off- camera flash. It can be mounted on a strobo frame, shoot with the flash set for TTL, and don't shoot any slower than a 1/60th. I shoot a lot of sports, and this is the only way to get the shots you want. You will have dark shadows across the gym, but your subjects should be sharp and in focus. A ref might object, but then the light duration of an electronic flash is only 1/30000 of a second. And if you are shooting from the sidelines or behind the endline, you have no fear of blinding your team.
Hope these ideas help. Good shooting.
- Doug Elliott

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NEW QUESTION 14: Shooting Sports Photography
I love the idea of blurring athletes or just the back round while they are still focused. Is it always going to be necessary to use a tripod, or just if I can keep the athlete focused and centered? I haven't done this a lot. Thanks
- Beowulf

ANSWER 1:
You can do this without a tripod with a fast shutter speed. (The longer your lens is ... the faster the speed you will need to avoid camera shake.)
To blur the background, use a wide aperture, and get as close to your subject as you can. When combined with a fast shutter, the athlete will be frozen against an out-of-focus background.
Also to blur the background, try "panning" with the action of the athlete. While keeping the subject in the viewfinder, rotate your body and the camera to keep up with the motion. When the athlete reaches a pre-determined spot, fire the shot and follow through with the motion until the subject re-appears in the viewfinder. Try slower shutter speeds (1/15 to 1/60 second) for best results. You will have to contend with some overall fuzziness due to camera-shake when doing this hand-held.
This is a difficult technique to master, but you can practice by shooting cars on the highway, or a kid on a bicycle.

To blur the athlete against a sharp background, you will need your tripod or other firm support. Use a slow shutter speed (1/4 to 1/30 second), and keep the camera perfectly still during exposure.
- Bob Cammarata

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NEW QUESTION 15: Drop Shadows to Prevent Good Printing?
Hi all. I heard that if a drop shadow is placed on your images (as they do here at Betterphoto), it prevents people from being able to print a nice image straight off of the computer. Does anyone know if this is true? I'm just trying to learn every possible way to protect images from being "stolen" on the net. Thanks!
- Cat Lee

ANSWER 1:
A drop shadow will not help, because it can be easily cropped out. If you are really concerend you need to watermark your images.
You can see what I mean by going to my gallery:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallByMember.asp?mem=44572
I teach this technique in my class Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox 2.
- Lewis Kemper

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Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #3

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Panoramic Composition
Hi! I have a question about putting a panoramic photo together on Photoshop CS. Since I don't actually have CS, but 7.0, I have to go to a library to put these pictures together. By the way, I shoot with film right now because my camera was cheaper than something like the digital version of my camera, Canon's Digital Rebel.
I recently took a picture of the visitor side stands at an IU football game, I took three shots and at 1/125 but I don't know if the F/stop stayed the same. Probably not, anyway, I put them together with photo merge and they have obvious lines where one picture stopped and the other started, also, many horizontal lines appear to be broken like the sidelines and the top level of the stands. Any help? Thanks!
- Andrew Laverghetta

See Sample Photo - Memorial Stadium :
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=549350

ANSWER 1:
Why go to the library if you have 7.0? Use a tripod with a bubble level. Use manual, so your exposure stays the same.
Better to use a 50mm, but take several pictures across. Cut mostly the center part of each picture and use Photoshop to connect them (like 3/5 if you had a 50mm; a wide angle maybe the middle 1/3 due to distortion).
Leave some room for overlap when stacking layers, and use a feathered eraser tool to blend the edges.
Once the layers are lined up and flattened, you may have to do a slight crop to get the very top and bottom edge straight.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
No reason to go to the library, Andrew. Even the cutdown version of Photoshop (Elements) will allow you to stitch multiple images into a panorama. It won't save you, however, from having to make sure that when you are taking the shots to form the pano that you keep the aperture and shutter speed constant for each image.
- Chris Howarth

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ANSWER 3:
Hi. I would like to add my query to it: Do we need to keep the exposure the same for every shot we take? What if we are in interiors - some areas might be darker, then the other ... will it render OK?
Also, how to we get the right exposure for overall compositions for pano? Do we need to move our tripod head - 30 degrees, 12 times - so we get a complete 360-degree turn?
What should be the focal length of the lens: 50mm or lower? Thanks, and regards.
- dipesh

ANSWER 4:
Keeping the exposure the same will hide light to dark lines. But if dark areas need to be brought out to show detail, you'll have to use other tools to make it look even. You move the tripod head as many times as it takes. The horizonal curvature that wide-angle lenses have make it harder for each section to line up evenly.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 5:
Also, there is a button in PhotoMerge that says Keep as Layers. If you check that button, the image will not be flattened and you can adjust the separate layers to make the blending smoother.
I have a whole lesson on PhotoMerge in my class, Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #2. I teach you some exciting techniques for matching colors, and using layer masks to help with the blends.
- Lewis Kemper

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Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #1
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #2
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #3

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