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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, September 27, 2004
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* SPOTLIGHT: Fall Session of Online Classes Fast Approaching!
* BETTERPHOTO: Book of the Month: Tony Sweet's Fine Art Nature Photography
* BETTERPHOTO: Fantastic Offer on Jim Miotke's Exciting New DVD!
* BETTERPHOTO: Ben Willmore Shares Photoshop Expertise... in Books and in a Great Course
* FEATURED GALLERY: Focus on Autumn: Such a Colorful Season
* FEATURED PLACE: Focus on Mexico: Such a Colorful Land
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Foresight / Movie Time
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Isolate and Illustrate When Shooting Stock ... By Charlie Borland
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Panoramic Composition
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Inkjet Vs. Photo Processing
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Do's and Don'ts of a Catholic Wedding?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Which Software and Printer Works?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Close-up Lenses
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Shutter Speeds
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: How Do I Find a Good Pro Lab?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: What Program to Use to Make Colorized Photos
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Telephoto Lens for Shooting Sports
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Editing from Disk
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Confused About Best Film Per Situation
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Teaching Basics to Middle Schoolers
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Use of a Circular Polarized Filter.
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Resizing Files
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 3: Selective Coloring


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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Fall Session of Online Classes Fast Approaching!
BetterPhoto's next online school session begins Oct. 6th, and a number of courses are already filled up or are filling up quickly. Still, there are many awesome classes from which to choose. If you need help in the decision-making process, try out our new Guide to Skill Levels. At this page, you can read concise definitions for each level of photographic ability - Beginner; Beginner to Serious Hobbyist; Serious Hobbyist; Serious Hobbyist to Intermediate; Intermediate; Intermediate to Advanced; and Advanced/Professional. This serves as a rough guide for you to determine where you fit in, since our courses are matched up with these categories. See this handy new guide to BetterPhoto's online classes at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/skill.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 179th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Lots of excitement at BetterPhoto as we come upon a new month! Next week, the fall session of online photo courses begins, and we've never had a better lineup. In fact, there's something for just about anyone! For details, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp

Also, we are thrilled to announce our new Book of the Month program! Each month, we will spotlight one of the great books (or DVDs) by our talented instructors. Tony Sweet's "Fine Art Nature Photography" kicks off this new feature; see below for more info.

In addition, instructor Charlie Borland offers an expert tip on shooting stock: isolating and illustrating. Also, be sure to check out the outstanding images in the Featured Gallery (on autumn) and the Featured Place (covering Mexico), as well as an excellent collection of questions and answers.

That's it for now. Have a great week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Book of the Month: Tony Sweet's Fine Art Nature Photography
Our online store showcases the fantastic books and DVDs from our staff of BetterPhoto instructors. Now, each month, we are also putting one of these fine products in the spotlight! Starting things off is Tony Sweet's inspirational (and informational) book, "Fine Art Nature Photography." If you buy this beautiful book before the end of October, you will receive free shipping (to U.S. destinations). Best yet, it's autographed by Tony! For all the details on this October selection, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetailLg.asp?productID=1173>

Tony also teaches some excellent courses right here at BetterPhoto.com, including "Fine Art Flower Photography":
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/TNS02.asp

And "Image Design - Revealing Your Personal Vision":
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/TNS01.asp


*****
Fantastic Offer on Jim Miotke's Exciting New DVD!
Learn digital photography in Jim Miotke's entertaining and instructional new DVD, "Digital Photography Unleashed: Capturing Wildly Great Photos." In a Special Limited Edition Offer, pre-order Jim's DVD before it officially hits the streets (October 30th), and receive an autographed, numbered copy (1 of 500) - while supplies last. You will also get the DVD at a special discounted price of $19.95 ($5 less than retail). But there's more! If you order today, you will also get a bonus signed 5 x 7 print of one of Jim's images. These DVDs are selling quick! Pre-order your copy today at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1256


*****
Ben Willmore Shares Photoshop Expertise... in Books and in a Great Course
BetterPhoto's newest instructor, Ben Willmore, has been called the "go-to guy" when it comes to Photoshop. It's no wonder, considering his vast experience in teaching and writing on the subject! And we now has autographed copies of his outstanding books in BetterPhoto's online store. Check out:

  • "How to Wow: Photoshop for Photography" at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1278
  • And the weighty "Adobe Photoshop CS Studio Techniques" at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1279

    Ben is also teaching an excellent new online course this fall, "Photoshop Mastery: The Essentials". This course is a huge hit. To ensure a spot in the class, go to:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BEN01.asp

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    FEATURED GALLERY
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    Focus on Autumn: Such a Colorful Season
    Few things say "color" quite like fall foliage and fallen leaves. For instance, take a look at the autumn photography of BetterPhoto members and instructors, and you'll discover quite an awesome array of grand landscapes, incredible reflections, and intimate details. But there are also other colorful icons of autumn - pumpkins and scarecrows - and you'll see nice shots of those, too. View BetterPhoto's fall-color gallery at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=449

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    FEATURED PLACE
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    Focus on Mexico: Such a Colorful Land
    Color may be the best adjective to describe that most beautiful of countries ... Mexico! Check out the wonderful work of BetterPhoto instructors and members. Their images display a wealth of color: from eye-catching architecture to fantastic sunsets to beautiful clothing. View our Mexico gallery at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=195

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    PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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    Last week, we asked:
    The final two issues of Alfred Stieglitz's Camera Work were dedicated to the work of which up-and-coming photographer?

    The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Richard Killey is:
    Paul Strand, at age twenty-five, caught the spirit in 1915 when he produced his first abstract photographs. In 1917 the final issue of Camera Work was devoted to Strand's work.

    To see all answers to this question, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

    And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Movie Time - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

    What brand of camera does Richard Dreyfuss use to photograph Madeleine Stowe during the first night of his Stakeout with Emilio Estevez?

    Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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    THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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    Isolate and Illustrate When Shooting Stock ... By Charlie Borland
    Your photos need to tell your visual story by either isolating your subject from the background, or you illustrate your visual story by including the background. An example:

    You are shooting a woman riding a bike down the street. You use a long telephoto lens with a wide-open lens aperture for shallow depth of field so the background is just a blur. You have just "isolated" her from the background. She could be anywhere in the world riding that bike. If you put a wide angle lens on the camera and include the Eiffel Tower on the horizon, you have "illustrated" your visual story: She is bike riding in Paris.

    Now take those concepts and think about salability. The "isolated" image can sell anywhere because the background doesn’t place its location, while the "illustrated" photo will only sell if the buyer needs bike riding in Paris. Think about this as you shoot, and try to isolate and/or illustrate every photo set-up you do.

    Take Charlie Borland's online course:
    Stock Photography

    Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

    Add Your Own Tip:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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    ADVERTISEMENT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
    My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:

    • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
    • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
    • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
    You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

    BetterPhoto.com
    P.O. Box 2781
    Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

    To order online, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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    NEW QUESTION 1: Panoramic Composition
    Hi! I have a question about putting a panoramic photo together on Photoshop CS. Since I don't actually have CS, but 7.0, I have to go to a library to put these pictures together. By the way, I shoot with film right now because my camera was cheaper than something like the digital version of my camera, Canon's Digital Rebel.
    I recently took a picture of the visitor side stands at an IU football game, I took three shots and at 1/125 but I don't know if the F/stop stayed the same. Probably not, anyway, I put them together with photo merge and they have obvious lines where one picture stopped and the other started, also, many horizontal lines appear to be broken like the sidelines and the top level of the stands. Any help? Thanks!
    - Andrew Laverghetta

    See Sample Photo - Memorial Stadium :
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=549350

    ANSWER 1:
    Why go to the library if you have 7.0? Use a tripod with a bubble level. Use manual, so your exposure stays the same.
    Better to use a 50mm, but take several pictures across. Cut mostly the center part of each picture and use Photoshop to connect them (like 3/5 if you had a 50mm; a wide angle maybe the middle 1/3 due to distortion).
    Leave some room for overlap when stacking layers, and use a feathered eraser tool to blend the edges.
    Once the layers are lined up and flattened, you may have to do a slight crop to get the very top and bottom edge straight.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11774

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11774

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 2: Inkjet Vs. Photo Processing
    I am working with a photographer for my wedding photos - a great photographer and quite pricey. He does his own printing on an inkjet printer. I wasn't totally satisfied with the photos; the colors were off and the pictures were just not smooth looking. It almost looked as if there were white specs in the photos. I want them to be matte. Should I have him process the photos in a lab with the photo process?
    - Anita Ponchione

    ANSWER 1:
    Did he shoot your wedding in digital? If so, the digital files will print well on high-end professional digital printers (if he shot 'em at a high enough resolution). Matte paper exists for these printers.
    If he shot them on conventional film, then you have the right to ask for quality printing. Inkjet prints may fade more quickly than conventional prints. All prints will fade if hung in the sun or bright light long enough.
    For your money, you deserve the best.
    - Doug Nelson

    Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11771

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11771

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 3: Do's and Don'ts of a Catholic Wedding?
    I am shooting my first Catholic wedding and I want to know what to expect. What are the do's and don'ts of a Catholic wedding?
    - Crystal

    ANSWER 1:
    Crystal,
    Check with the priest. He will give you the do's and don'ts. Some have personal restrictions, and others don’t.
    The last one I did I was allowed behind the priest and the couple, so I was shooting towards the people in the pews. I could not use a flash. I used a monopod to stabilize the camera and shoot.
    Most clergy will allow photographs of the ceremony from the back of the church or from the balcony without using a flash.
    I would like to suggest that you get your families to the church about 2 1/2 hours before the wedding. Shoot most of your alter formals with the groom and his family, and then do the bride. After the ceremony, you can do the combined families.
    Good Luck.
    Doug
    P.S.: Make sure you check and clean your equipment the day before, and make certain you have extra film and batteries. Always bring more than you think you will need.
    - Doug Elliott

    ANSWER 2:
    Thank you so much for your advice. I will update on the results next month.
    - Crystal

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11753

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11753

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 4: Which Software and Printer Works?
    I am no professional photographer but love taking pictures and have recently purchased what I thought would be a good combination for developing digital photos. I use a Canon Digital Rebel, a Kodak professional 8500 digital printer, and Adobe Photoshop 7. When printing my pictures, it's like a roll of the dice. Sometimes I get beautiful pictures, sometimes they're so grainy and dark. Can someone offer any advice? Thanks in advance.
    - Mitzi

    ANSWER 1:
    The only way to avoid printing on a trial-and-error basis is to spend the time and money to establish an ICC workflow, where all of your devices are calibrated. For printing, it is the monitor and printer that need to be profiled. Once you have done that, then you eliminate the need for test prints because what you see on your monitor and what comes out of the printer are a match.

    The least expensive and easiest way to get started on this path is o purchase Monaco EZ Color 2.6 with the Optix Colorimeter. The Monaco package does an excellent job of calibrating your monitor and a reasonable job of calibrating your printer. If you do not want to hassle with making printer profiles you can have them done for you at www.Profilecity.com, but you will need to hardware calibrate your monitor!
    - Lewis Kemper

    See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Lewis Kemper:
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #1
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #2
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #3

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11739

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11739

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 5: Close-up Lenses
    Please, can you tell me if I add 4+2+1 close-up lenses in a stack, which comes first or nearest to the camera? Thanks.
    - Pat Welsh

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Pat.
    Theoretically, it should make no difference. Experience says to put the highest magnification nearest to the camera for best results.
    Cheers
    DC
    - Dave Cross

    ANSWER 2:
    Thanks, DC, for your reply. Most helpful.
    - Pat Welsh

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11737

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11737

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 6: Shutter Speeds
    I don't understand shutter speeds ... 1/60 ... etc. ... please help.
    - Christye J. Bernard

    ANSWER 1:
    It's easy to get confused. Shutter speed is the length of time that the film is exposed to light when the shutter is depressed. The numbers on the shutter dial are somewhat similar to aperture. The aperture is how much light passes through the lens; the shutter speed is how long that same light is exposed to the film (or CCD sensors on a digital). The numbers are whole seconds and fractions of a second. Let's just say, for instance, your camera starts at 1 second. Next down would be 1/2. For every click of the shutter, you are cutting the amount of time in half (closing down=faster=less light) or doubling the amount of time (opening up=slower=more light). The speeds are different from camera to camera. Most are pretty similar. Mine can go as slow as 16 whole seconds, or as fast as 1/4000th of a second. Slow speeds are usually for low light conditions and fast for bright light conditions. Hope this helps. Be glad to help you if you have more ?'s. Regards,
    - R.M. Fusco

    ANSWER 2:
    R.M.'s response is correct ... in that shutter speed controls the length of time the film (or sensor) is exposed to light. To better understand shutter speeds, keep this simple guideline in mind:
    The human eye/brain sees motion at 1/60 second. Any action photo shot at that speed will look pretty close to how it was perceived to the naked eye.
    Picture in your mind, a hovering helicopter, and how the blades appear ... slightly blurred, but discernable. If you were to shoot that heli at 1/60 second, the same degree of implied motion would be evident in the photo.
    If the chopper were to be shot at 1/125 or faster, you would see more detail in the individual blades.
    At 1/500 second and beyond ... the blades would be frozen in place, and show no motion at all.
    Conversely, shutter speeds slower than 1/60 second will transform the motion of the rotors to a soft blur ... getting progressively more pronounced as the time of exposure increases.
    As far as your particular camera settings go ... choose a shutter speed (and corresponding aperture setting) which will best fit your intended results.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    Yes, it is correct also that shutter speed affects motion. A fast shutter speed will freeze motion, and a slow shutter speed will blur, or as Bob mentioned, stop motion to the same degree the human eye would see it. Also, I forgot to mention the speeds are represented on the dial or display screen as what may appear to be whole numbers, but are fractions of a second after the number 1. For instance, the #2 is a 1/2 second, the #4 is a 1/4 second, the #8 is an 1/8 second ... etc. ... etc. ... etc. Also, whenever possible, you should use a tripod for shutter speeds slower than 1/125th of a second to avoid blur due to camera shake. Regards,
    - R.M. Fusco

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11732

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11732

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 7: How Do I Find a Good Pro Lab?
    I live in a small west Texas town, and I need to find a good lab for my developing and ordering. I have looked online and found Clark color lab that sounds OK, but how do I know they will be any better than Wal-Mart (which is pretty much my local access)? There are some labs in some larger cities, but I am not sure how good they are either. I am getting ready to start out professionally, and need to find out what all you pros do. Thanks in advance.
    - Tonya Cozart

    ANSWER 1:
    I forgot to add that I can, of course, and will have to do mail order, so I suppose any good lab would work for me if you can suggest any.
    - Tonya Cozart

    ANSWER 2:
    Hi Tonya: A good question, and I definitely know how difficult it can be to find a good pro lab (or custom lab) that you can trust!

    I live near Sacramento, California, and I have been using Cali-Color - http://www.calicolor.com - for many years ... for slide-film developing, for scanning, and for print-making.

    A lab in San Francisco that's popular with professionals is The New Lab - http://www.newlab.com During several shoots in S.F., I used this lab for reliable, quality developing. The New Lab does an active mail-order business, as well as walk-in traffic.

    I know there are many other pro or custom labs, but these are two that I can personally recommend!

    Good luck, Tonya!
    Kerry
    - Kerry Drager

    See Kerry Drager's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Kerry Drager's Web Site - KerryDrager.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
    Point, Think, and Shoot: Beyond the Snapshot
    Field Techniques: Dynamic Outdoor Photography
    4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups
    4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups (2nd Session)

    ANSWER 3:
    If you're into slides, got to The Slideprinter, Denver, CO. They have a Web site where you can find their address. I've used them to make prints from slides and they're really great. They offer slide developing service - I've never used it.
    I've found Clark to be very good, at an especially good price. But, now that I have a scanner that does prints, slides and negatives (color or B/W), I'm really only interested in the negatives and, generally speaking, even one-hour labs do a pretty good job with developing the roll of film.
    Because Clark, Wal-Mart, and even Kodak are using computerized printers, none will give you really "custom" results. If you try to bracket a shot at less than a one-stop bracket, the computerized machines will normalize results, and you won't see the difference.

    I'd look into back issues of Pop Photo, or even their Web site. They've had occasional articles about different labs around the country.

    Beyond that, try to visit a local pro, a wedding photographer, or the like. As him/her where s/he gets work done.
    Good luck.
    - John Sandstedt

    ANSWER 4:
    Hello Tonya,
    I use A&I (Los Angeles, CA) via mail order from Baltimore, MD. They're very professional, individually expose each frame (prints), and are reasonably priced. The 35mm C-41 mailers are 11.95 from bhphotovideo.com and 12.50 directly from www.aandi.com. I've used them many times and they always do a great job, whether I tell them to print a certain way or if they just print what they think is best. They also do B/W and slides.
    Good luck on finding the lab that suits you.
    - Jordan

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11731

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11731

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 8: What Program to Use to Make Colorized Photos
    I want to make pictures that have both color and black and white. Like a picture of a woman holding a rose and she is in black and white but the rose is red. What program do I need to do this to photos?
    - Brianna

    ANSWER 1:
    Photoshop ...
    - Damian Gadal

    Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Make that 2 votes for Photoshop.
    - Traci D. Brumley

    ANSWER 3:
    Numerous photo programs are available that will allow you the ability to do this effect. As mentioned, Photoshop, but is $$. Paint shop Pro, Elements, Picture It, Photo-Paint, Photo Impact, etc. Depends on what you have currently and are used to using. If you own none of those programs currently, then the one to choose will be based upon "your" personal preference as to your comfortability and knowledge in using their tools and effects and work space; and the cost you wish to spend. Being comfortable with using the program you choose in your workflow will provide you more enjoyment and more use of the program. And that should allow you to be more creative and spend less time as you learn the tools, work space, effects, and shortcuts of your program.
    - Kip Berger

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11729

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11729

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 9: Telephoto Lens for Shooting Sports
    I need more zoom. I currently have a 75-300 4-5.6. Should I get a converter or look to buy a lens? I would like a smaller aperture and faster lens. I mostly shoot fast-action sports, soccer, football and motorcross. What do you recommend?
    - Johnna Romkee

    ANSWER 1:
    A faster lens would be your best option ... unless you want to shoot at a higher ISO setting, and be content with grainier action shots.
    If you were to add a teleconverter to your current lens, you would indeed get more reach ... but at the cost of a slower shutter speed or less depth of field.
    For outdoor events in bright sun, this might be do-able, but for indoor arenas, I doubt you'll be able to acquire enough speed to freeze the action.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11728

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11728

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 10: Editing from Disk
    Is it possible to edit pictures on a CD? I'm going on a trip, and may not necessarily want to copy all pix to my computer, from my camera. So can I copy to CD and still edit them and then copy the edited version to my computer? Thanks to anyone who can help.
    - Kelly A. Rocco

    ANSWER 1:
    Sure. Once an image is on a CD, it can be brought into a computer and then edited. You just will not be able to hit Save to put it back on the CD. You will need to save it to a hard drive and then "burn" it back to the same or another CD depending on your CD burner.
    - Lewis Kemper

    See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Lewis Kemper:
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #1
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #2
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #3

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11716

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11716

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 11: Confused About Best Film Per Situation
    I've been reading so many suggestions about the best film to use for various situations that I think I've confused myself. Just to verify, would someone tell me the best film to use for the following?
    1) Shooting studio portraits w/flood lights. I've used Kodak Portra 160NC, but now I'm not sure if I need something that is tungsten balanced.
    2) Outdoor pics (family portraits, weddings).

    By the way, I use a Pentax (I have an old MESUPER, ME and a new ZXL). I have various lenses and a VIVITAR 385 External Flash on a bracket.
    Thank you!
    - REGINA D. YOUNG

    ANSWER 1:
    Kodak Porta and Fuji's nph thru npz are made for portrait. They include weddings in there too.
    Kodak has a film made for portraits: tungsten film Porta 100. Fuji has Reala that they say is good for portraits and is good for flouro lighting.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Gregory,

    Thank you for responding! So, would you recommend the Kodak Portra T100 (I assume the name is something like that) for flood lighting? And then stick w/the Portra 160NC for outdoor and weddings?
    Thanks, so much!
    - REGINA D. YOUNG

    ANSWER 3:
    Hi Regina,
    I would recommend trying them and seeing what you like. No one here can tell you what to use, only what they use. And what others use should not have any influence on what you wind up using.
    Also, remember to ask your lab if they have a recommendation for optimum results. It's not just your camera, but processing and printing, which I assume you leave to them, is a big part of the process.
    - Jerry Frazier

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    ANSWER 4:
    That's right, because I've never used Porta. So make your own choice after a roll. All I can tell you is I like Fuji over Kodak.
    - Gregory La Grange

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    NEW QUESTION 12: Teaching Basics to Middle Schoolers
    I will be teaching the basics of using a 35mm SLR to middle schoolers (ages 12-14) beginning in December. I have several questions. With the grant money, I am going to order about 12 cameras. I want to get camera bags, maybe some extra lenses, filters, color film, etc. Do you have any suggestions on what to buy? Where to buy? Also, aside from using the basic functions of the camera, what would you feel are the most important aspects of color photography to cover w/the students? Ideas for lessons, organizing photos, photo tricks, tips, contests. Slide film? Prints on CD? I do have access to scanners and smart boards. Any other ideas?
    - Sandy Kay

    ANSWER 1:
    WOW! What a wonderful grant to get! I don't know how much money you have to spend, but you might be able to save a few dollars, asking a local camera shop to donate film and camera bags, as advertising on their part. Or, I know Wal-Mart is usually real good about donating for educational purposes. They could supply you with film and processing, and even camera bags and tripods.
    I take photography classes at our local community college. The textbook that they are currently using is very good and covers some valuable information on color photography, the book is "Photography" seventh edition, by Barbara London, John Upton, Ken Kobre, and Betsy Brill. The ISBN number is 0130282715. This would be a good book to use as a tool for teaching.
    Good luck! I wish there had been a program like this when I was in middle school.
    - Rhonda L. Tolar

    ANSWER 2:
    The cheapest and, BTW, one of the most durable cameras is the Canon TX or TLb. They take the super bargain Canon FD lenses. The 50mm f1.8 can go as cheap as $10. Buy one or two each of 28's and 135's. Check out the online auctions for these. Have a repair contract with someone who can make you a package deal on replacing the foam seals and mirror bumper on all of them.
    - Doug Nelson

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    ANSWER 3:
    Amazing. I would have LOVED to be offered such a course, instead of run-of-the-mill shop class. I would have to personally agree with Doug, as I learned on my grandfather's TX. It's so simple and easy, it's wonderful. Do be a LITTLE careful on buying used FD 50s: Some of them have been used HEAVILY, and are kinda stiff and hard to focus for a beginner.
    - Alex Cabrall

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    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Use of a Circular Polarized Filter.
    I have a silly question. I know a circular polarized filter is used for outdoor photographs to remove glare from reflections. Can one use it for indoor photographs? Is there any harm that one can keep it put on to the camera lens as permanant protection without affecting the photographs that are taken with it.
    - Manish Issar

    ANSWER 1:
    The main drawbacks I see in this is that longer exposure times will be required. And every time you rotate your camera from horizontal to vertical format, you'll have to re-evaluate your shutter speed/aperture combinations. Bottom line is ... I'd leave it off unless it is prerequisite to a particular effect you're trying to achieve.
    - Bob Cammarata

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    ANSWER 2:
    Also, the view in your viewfinder is much darker.
    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 3:
    If you want protection for your lens, go with a UV filter. When I bought my camera, the dealer recommended this to protect my lens. I have one on each of my lenses and never take them off. Have replaced one. But now if I bump the lens and get a scratch on it, I replace the $14 UV filter, not the lens :-)
    As for the rest of the question, I've never tried my polarizing lens inside, but am thinking both the above responses would apply, and again, as far as protection goes ... UV filters and much cheaper if you need to replace. Also, when you DO want to use the polarizing filter, put it right over the UV. As long as you don't stack too many filters on, it'll work just fine; you may have to adjust shutter speed.
    - Kathy J. Cooper

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    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Resizing Files
    I read somewhere that it is possible to enlarge files without losing quality. Many stock agencies don't accept files less than 55mb. When I convert my raw file to TIFF format in 16bit mode I get a 36mb file. Is there a way to satisfy the 55mb requirement of stock agencies?
    - Leonid Strizhevskiy

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    ANSWER 1:
    What is the size of your TIFF image? Is the size the stock agencies are requiring a particular? A raw image of 16mb will produce a final image 8 x 10 at 720dpi of 79.1MB. Hope this is of help.
    - Doug Elliott

    ANSWER 2:
    Stock agencies set that as a criterion in order to weed out everyone who buys a digital camera and wants to be a stock photographer. One can only imagine the millions upon millions of files they would get if anyone could send their files to a stock agency with no type of limitation. Of course, 35meg is enough for stock usage, but the 55meg requirement implicitly says that one needs to spend the money for a 1DS or the new Nikon in order to submit material, and that will automatically knock out any amateurs who do not want to invest that kind of money in a digital camera. I'm a professional and still primarily shoot film for that reason. A transparency scan is 54meg in the mount and about 60 meg when scanned outside of the mount using a desktop scanner in 8 bit mode. But, stock agencies have you there, also. They'll require any scans being submitted to be DRUM scans, which at about $25 a scan will pretty much cut out the amateurs from flooding their mailboxes with CDs. Unfortunately, if you want to be a stock photographer these days, you'll need to spend the $5000+ for the Canon 1DS, the Nikon 2X, or the new Kodak DCS. Or, get into the stock agency the old-fashioned way ... by submitting about 500 top-quality transparencies for review.
    - Tony Sweet

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    ANSWER 3:
    Thanks, Doug and Tony,
    I most appreciate your prompt responses. I shoot with a Canon 10D, raw files are 5-6mb. Judging by Tony's response, I have no chance with this camera. I wonder: Will they be able to tell a quality interpolated file from a TIFF directly converted from raw?
    - Leonid Strizhevskiy

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    ANSWER 4:
    If your camera is 6mp or above and you shoot RAW and convert to TIFF, then you should be able to upsize the photos using Genuine Fractiles and be able to make the "grade" ... hth
    - Damian Gadal

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    ANSWER 5:
    Leonid,
    I shoot with an Olympus E-1, which has a 5 megapixel resolution. I almost always shoot in SHQ Jpeg mode and convert to TIFF for saving print files. My camera produces a 6X8 in. image file at 314dpi. I frequently resample those files to 12X16in @300dpi which produces a 54 MB TIFF file for printing. I use Photoshop Elements 2 for resampling using bicubic resampling. The prints produced by those files are incredibly clean and sharp - as good as anything I've ever printed from 35mm film. So you should have no problem resampling your 10D images to 55 MB with excellent results. I firmly believe that the case for huge megapixel cameras is grossly overstated in most instances. Your Canon is totally capable of producing sellable stock images - as long as the images you capture are good quality.
    - Greg McCroskery

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    ANSWER 6:
    Unfortunately, Leonid, the stock agencies make the rules, and they want at least 50 MB raw files without interpolation. I agree with you that large MB cameras are overrated, as I use a Fuji S2 and those files are not acceptable. Hence, I shoot film and let the stock agencies do the digitizing to their standards.
    - Tony Sweet

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    ANSWER 7:
    Thank you, Greg and Tony,
    The only thing I don't understand, Tony, 50mb RAW. Did you mean NOT INTERPOLATED? For all I know, even medium format digital cameras don't produce such huge raws. Thanks again, and I wish both of you to be happy and successful.
    - Leonid Strizhevskiy

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    ANSWER 8:
    The only camera on the market that can give that size file is the Canon 1DS. But the new professional Nikon digital, at about 12 megapixel, will also be in the 50MB range.
    - Tony Sweet

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    ANSWER 9:
    It's pretty basic. When you start a business, you get the pro tools that will deliver quality service or product to your client. What kind of tools do you want your doctor to use on you? Your accountant, dentist, architect, contractor? So, do you have an interest in doing more than your competitor, or do you just want to barely make it to the edge?
    Do you want to spend your time on the computer, or out creating hundreds of perfect, computer free, images behind your camera?
    - Ken Henry

    ANSWER 10:
    It's pretty basic. When you start a business you get the pro tools that will deliver quality service or product to your client.

    What kind of tools do you want your doctor to use on you? Your accountant, dentist, architect, contractor.

    So, do you have an interest of doing more than your competitor or do you just want to barely make it to the edge?

    Do you want to spend your time on the computer, or out creating hundreds of perfect, computor free, images behind your camera?
    - Ken Henry

    ANSWER 11:
    First of all, I would like to express my gratitude to everyone who took part in the discussion - it has been such a lively exchange.
    Just out of curiosity: I understand that 55mb requirement is the first line of defence of stock agencies. How do they defend themselves from tons of transparences, produced by point-and-shoot film cameras? Their owners may entertain the same ambitions as the owners of digital point-and-shoot cameras.
    - Leonid Strizhevskiy

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    ANSWER 12:
    All major stock agencies request an initial submission of 200 - 500 images. They check for quality, consistency, talent, unique point of view. It's unusual that anyone except a professional or professional-quality amateur would have 200 top-level images, consistently producing professional work on a monthly basis.
    - Tony Sweet

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    ANSWER 13:
    Good to the point, Tony Sweet. Whatever professional field one pursues ... or let's say it this way, when one steps up to be a performing professional there are no short-cuts. You are the cut above all others. You no longer have the "easy" 40-hour work weeks. You can no longer tend your garden or care for any pets. Your point-n-shoot SLR gear goes out on the next garage sale.
    My client is my paycheck, I pursue to deliver better than what he requires.
    - Ken Henry

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    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 3: Selective Coloring
    I am interested in doing selective coloring with black and white photos. I would like to know what program I need to purchase for this. I have the Picture It program.
    - Kathy Gossage

    ANSWER 1:
    Just came across your question, Kathy, and thought I might give you some starting points. I used to have a program called MGI Photo Suite. It was a lower-priced program and had some neat features on it, but was quite basic. It did, however, allow me to do selective coloring. I use Jasc Paint Shop Pro 8 (and just got version 9 but haven't had a chance to try it yet). It is a pared-down version of the more expensive Adobe Photoshop and runs around $100. It has tons of features, options, effects, etc., and allows selective coloring in a variety of ways too.
    I am sure there are TONS of other programs out there, but those are the ones I am familiar with. Hope this helps :-)
    - Jan Stadelmyer

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    ANSWER 2:
    If you are really on a budget, there is a free download called GIMP that works excellent for selective coloring. It's COMPLICATED, though. If you don't have any experience in high-end programs it might be hard to figure out, but there are selective coloring tutorials online for GIMP. Run a search and you can download it and find all the tutorials quite easily. You need to also download an extraction tool to install it in Windows.
    PS Elements 2.0 does selective coloring quite well too. It's almost as complicated as GIMP. I use a combination of both these programs AND Picture It (which is still the most easy program for frames, adding text, easy fixes, etc.). The only reason I bought PSE is that it uses filters I need for my illustrations. Otherwise I would stick solely with GIMP and save $80.
    - Karma Wilson

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    ANSWER 3:
    This may not be the only way, but with Picture It, you can try sandwiching two copies of the same image, but with the b/w image cut out the areas that you want the color areas below to show through.
    - Gregory La Grange

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    ANSWER 4:
    I use Photoshop, but I'm sure any program that lets you do layers will work. I start by making a new copy layer, then I desaturate the copy layer. Then using the eraser tool, I erase what I want in color and the color shows through. Working on a copy layer you can play with lighting, filters, and opacity to make your picture truly unique.
    - Dennis W. Mcclain

    ANSWER 5:
    Kathy, all the answers given are correct. I use Picture It, which is only about $50, and I can do selective coloring in several ways. One is to paint directly over my B/W version, varying the transparency of the colors. It also has a "colorize" feature, which can be used to selectively color certain areas, or you can do it through layering, and erasing just the areas you want to show through. Lots of options with almost any software out there.
    - Shirley Cross

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    ANSWER 6:
    Kathy, it sounds to me like you are starting with a B/W photo and want to add your own color rather than selectively removing color from parts of a color photo. I hand-color lots of photos using Photoshop 6, but it looks like you could use several other programs. Here's a couple of tips that work well for me. First, add a new layer so you are not painting on the actual photo. I often use a new layer for each color. I get the best results by setting my layer blending mode to multiply or overlay and drop the layer opacity way down. These blending modes allow shadows, etc., to appear more natural. This approach also allows you to toggle between different blending modes to see what looks best. You can also use the opacity slider for the layer to adjust the density of the color. Painting on layers also lets you slop the color on and then clean up with the eraser tool without damaging the photo below. Have fun.
    - Steve Mescha

    ANSWER 7:
    You could also use Photoshop Elements - another inexpensive program that will give you layers. Make Hue Saturation adjustment layers, and click the Colorize button. Then adjust the Hue/Saturation sliders to shift the whole image to whatever color you are looking for. Then fill the layer with black (to hide the color change), and then paint with white on the areas you want to change. By using this method, all the shadows and highlights of the original are preserved. Plus, all the adjustment layers are flexible and you can always go back and tweak a color.
    One of my Lessons in Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop Toolbox 2 covers this and other colorizing techniques.
    - Lewis Kemper

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