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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Tuesday, September 21, 2004
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* SPOTLIGHT: Special Offer on Jim Miotke's Exciting New DVD!
* BETTERPHOTO: Jim Zuckerman's New Short Course: Non-Digital Special Effects
* BETTERPHOTO: Ben Willmore Joins BetterPhoto Team With New Photoshop Course!
* BETTERPHOTO: BetterPhoto's Contest: Digital Darkroom Vs. Special Effects
* FEATURED GALLERY: Being Weather-Wise: Fog and Mood
* FEATURED PLACE: Capturing Oregon: Coast, Mountains, and More!
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: The Immortal Bard / Foresight
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Have Depth of Field Chart, Will Travel ... By Brenda Tharp
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Getting the Fight Exposure with Slide Film
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Are There Guidelines for Managing Income?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Resizing Files
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Infrared Filters and Digital Rebel
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Shooting Concert Without Flash
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Printing Problem
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Selective Coloring
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Where to Find Curves?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Lens Speed
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Cameras and Magnets
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: How to Save Digital Pictures
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Checklist for First Wedding?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: What Filter to Buy?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 14: Gig Photography
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: How to Get What You See?
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: How to Store Images on CD


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Special Offer on Jim Miotke's Exciting New DVD!
Learn the basics of digital photography in Jim Miotke's entertaining and instructional new DVD, "Digital Photography Unleashed: Capturing Wildly Great Photos." In a Special Limited Edition Offer, pre-order Jim's DVD before October 30th, and receive an autographed, numbered copy (1 of 500) - while supplies last. You will also get the DVD at a special discounted price of $19.95 ($5 less than retail). But there's more! If you order today, you will also get a bonus signed 5 x 7 print of one of Jim's images. It doesn't get any better than this! For all the details:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1256


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to the 178th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

So many incredible things going on these days at BetterPhoto.com! First, we welcome a new instructor, Ben Willmore, and his online course, "Photoshop Mastery: The Essentials." And we are thrilled to announce a new 4-Week Short Course, "Non-Digital Special Effects" by Jim Zuckerman. Read about these new additions to the BetterPhoto school below.

Also, we are offering a Special Limited Edition on my new DVD, "Digital Photography Unleashed: Capturing Wildly Great Photos." This is a terrific deal that includes a discounted price for pre-orders; an autographed, numbered copy of the DVD; and a bonus signed 5 x 7 print! For details:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1256

Also in this issue of SnapShot, instructor Brenda Tharp shares her knowledge in a photo tip: "Have Depth of Field Chart, Will Travel." Don't miss the Featured Gallery on fog and the Featured Place on Oregon. Once again, lots of helpful advice fills up our questions and answers section.

That's it for now. Have a great week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Jim Zuckerman's New Short Course: Non-Digital Special Effects
Instructor Jim Zuckerman has drawn on his vast experience – and his love of experimentation – to put together a fantastic new online class, "Non-Digital Special Effects." This 4-week Short Course is designed for anyone wanting to have hands-on fun that will result in some wild images. Among the techniques: blacklight, multiple exposures, kaleidoscopic images, painting with light, and diffusion and mirror images. For details:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JZK09.asp


*****
Ben Willmore Joins BetterPhoto Team With New Photoshop Course!
Award-winning Photoshop expert and author Ben Willmore joins our outstanding team of online instructors. In his exciting new eight-week course, "Photoshop Mastery: The Essentials," Ben will share his knowledge - specifically, the Photoshop tools that are most critical to the digital photographer. Read all about Ben's new course at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BEN01.asp

We also have an awesome variety of other online photography courses at BetterPhoto ... and the list of classes keeps getting better and better! To aid in decision making, try the new Course Finder on BetterPhoto's home page and the courses page, or go directly to our course categories page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


*****
BetterPhoto's Contest: Digital Darkroom Vs. Special Effects
Our monthly online contest features 10 categories, including two that may seem similar, but actually are not. Here's a rundown:

  • Digital Darkroom includes images created or drastically altered in software like Photoshop. Digitally manipulated pictures are allowed in other categories, but this category exclusively showcases such art. If digital darkroom work is your photo's main attraction, or if it plays a big part, enter it here. Specifics: Photoshop® composites and creations. Images greatly manipulated with "buZZ", "Flood", or other filters. Photos with artistic borders. Photos stitched into a panoramic.
  • Special Effects includes Polaroid transfers and SX-70 images. Photos that are handcolored and printed in a fine art fashion might be best here, too. We also look for images created with special-effect techniques - such as cross-processing or zooming the lens while taking a long exposure - as well as painting with light.
    For details photo examples on all categories, go to:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/contest/categories.asp

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    FEATURED GALLERY
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    Being Weather-Wise: Fog and Mood
    As in other heavy-overcast conditions, fog offers vibrant colors that pop out in the mist. However, foggy images can also reveal a strong interplay of soft light and simple shapes. In fact, BetterPhoto members and instructors have taken creative advantage of fog to evoke a sense of tranquility (with a light and bright look) or create a feeling of drama (dark and moody). For examples and inspiration, visit BetterPhoto's "Fog Pictures" gallery at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=1169

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    FEATURED PLACE
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    Capturing Oregon: Coast, Mountains, and More!
    Oregon's natural beauty dominates the Pacific Northwest with its wide-ranging collection of valley, desert, mountain, and coastal views. Check out the wonderful work of BetterPhoto members and instructors, and you'll see images like the following: giant sea stacks silhouetted against wild sunsets; coastal views captured in the magical colors of dawn; peaks framed by trees and reflected in mountain lakes; ocean waves crashing against shoreline rocks; moody scenes caught in fog; and ranch roundups filled with horses and riders. Also, enjoy the soft-and-silky flow of tall waterfalls captured with slow shutter speeds. For a big dose of inspiration, visit BetterPhoto's Oregon gallery at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=220

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    PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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    Last week, we asked:
    When art critic Sadakichi Hartmann criticized photographer Edward Steichen (1879-1973) with the phrase, "To paint or to photograph - that is the question," what play was he parodying?

    The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Sufyan Farooqi is:
    Shakespeare's "Hamlet," with the famous line: "To be or not to be ..."

    To see all answers to this question, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

    And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Foresight - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

    The final two issues of Alfred Stieglitz's Camera Work were dedicated to the work of which up-and-coming photographer?

    Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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    THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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    Have Depth of Field Chart, Will Travel ... By Brenda Tharp
    When photographing landscapes and scenics from which we want maximum depth of field, we need that handy hyperfocal distance chart. Yet, countless times, I've watched students in my field workshops end up 20-40 feet away from their bags as they searched for the best composition, and when they needed the chart, they didn't want to go back to get it - or didn't have time because of the light.

    Here's a quick, inexpensive solution to that problem: Laminate the chart with clear plastic, punch a hole in it, and attach it to your tripod with a cord wrap or plastic loop. The lamination is waterproof enough that the chart will withstand wet conditions, and when it finally wears out or tears off, you can cheaply replace it. You'll be glad to have it close by for those times when you need it.

    Take Brenda Tharp's online courses:



    Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

    Add Your Own Tip:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
    My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
    • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
    • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
    • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
    You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

    BetterPhoto.com
    P.O. Box 2781
    Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

    To order online, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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    NEW QUESTION 1: Getting the Fight Exposure with Slide Film
    I was recently asked to take pictures of a golf course. I decided to use slide film in order to get better colour. I shot with Fuji Sensia. Most of my pictures came out underexposed. Can you tell me if and how I can correct exposure in Photoshop and some tips on getting the right exposure using slide film for next time (as I am going back out to the course to shoot fall)? I like the sunsets, but they lack detail in the foreground and I also have some unwanted lens flares.
    - Tracey

    ANSWER 1:
    Keep in mind that, with slide film, you have less exposure lattitude than when shooting print (negative) film. The key to getting good exposures with slides is to avoid high-contrast situations, and metering off neutral colors within the scene. (A gray card is a good tool to use in tricky lighting scenarios.) Green grass is usually a good place to meter (which is good for you, since you'll be shooting at a golf course).

    Cloudy or hazy days will give the best results, since the light is diffused and less harsh. If your primary subject matter is dark, try not to include any sky in the composition, as it will likely be over-exposed. On those bright, sunny days we all hate - with direct light and deep shadows - meter off the highlights and let the shadows fall where they may.

    On your sunsets, detail loss in the foreground is a normal occurrence. Unless you use fill-flash to illuminate it, your foreground will silhouette.

    Lens flare is caused by shooting into the sun. You can adjust the camera angle so that the flare falls out-of-frame, or use a lens hood to partially block the sun to minimize this effect.

    Finally ... it's always good to bracket exposures. With slide film, since the margin of error is so narrow, bracket only in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11658

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11658

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 2: Are There Guidelines for Managing Income?
    I am somewhat new to photography. I have had my business for 2 years and am growing. Up until now almost everything I make I'm putting back into the business (buying backdrops, website, equipment, etc.) but now I'm wanting to manage it better - are there good books/guidelines on photographers business practices? For instance, is 5% or 20% of income reasonable for marketing? Any good tips or references would be helpful. Thanks!
    - Micki B.

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Micki: I won't be much help for you, but I know someone who can help! That would be instructor Vik Orenstein, whose book on this subject - Photographers Market Guide to Building Your Business - is sold through the BetterPhoto store. For information:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1238

    Good luck in your career, Micki!
    Kerry Drager
    kerry@betterphoto.com
    - Kerry Drager

    See Kerry Drager's Premium BetterPholio™
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    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
    Point, Think, and Shoot: Beyond the Snapshot
    Field Techniques: Dynamic Outdoor Photography
    Spring Course Extension with Kerry Drager
    4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups
    4-Week Short Course: Details and Close-ups (2nd Session)

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11647

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11647

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 3: Resizing Files
    I read somewhere that it is possible to enlarge files without losing quality. Many stock agencies don't accept files less than 55mb. When I convert my raw file to TIFF format in 16bit mode I get a 36mb file. Is there a way to satisfy the 55mb requirement of stock agencies?
    - Leonid Strizhevskiy

    See Leonid's Premium BetterPholio™

    Visit leoartphoto.com - Leonid's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    What is the size of your TIFF image? Is the size the stock agencies are requiring a particular? A raw image of 16mb will produce a final image 8 x 10 at 720dpi of 79.1MB. Hope this is of help.
    - Doug Elliott

    ANSWER 2:
    Stock agencies set that as a criterion in order to weed out everyone who buys a digital camera and wants to be a stock photographer. One can only imagine the millions upon millions of files they would get if anyone could send their files to a stock agency with no type of limitation. Of course, 35meg is enough for stock usage, but the 55meg requirement implicitly says that one needs to spend the money for a 1DS or the new Nikon in order to submit material, and that will automatically knock out any amateurs who do not want to invest that kind of money in a digital camera. I'm a professional and still primarily shoot film for that reason. A transparency scan is 54meg in the mount and about 60 meg when scanned outside of the mount using a desktop scanner in 8 bit mode. But, stock agencies have you there, also. They'll require any scans being submitted to be DRUM scans, which at about $25 a scan will pretty much cut out the amateurs from flooding their mailboxes with CDs. Unfortunately, if you want to be stock photographer these days, you'll need to spend the $5000+ for the Canon 1DS, the Nikon 2X, or the new Kodak DCS. Or, get into the stock agency the old-fashioned way ... by submitting about 500 top quality transparencies for review.
    - Tony Sweet

    See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

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    Image Design: Revealing Your Personal Vision
    Fine Art Flower Photography
    Fall Course Extension with Tony Sweet

    ANSWER 3:
    Thanks Doug and Tony,
    I most appreciate your prompt responses. I shoot with Canon 10D, raw files are 5-6mb. Judging by Tony's response, I have no chance with this camera.
    I wonder: Will they be able to tell a quality interpolated file from a tiff directly converted from raw?
    - Leonid Strizhevskiy

    See Leonid's Premium BetterPholio™

    Visit leoartphoto.com - Leonid's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 4:
    If your camera is 6mp or above and you shoot RAW and convert to TIFF, then you should be able to upsize the photos using Genuine Fractiles and be able to make the "grade" ... hth
    - Damian Gadal

    Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11641

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11641

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 4: Infrared Filters and Digital Rebel
    Has anyone tried using an infrared filter with their Canon Digital Rebel? If you have, can you send me a link to your picture(s) so I can see the results? It was suggested to me to use a Hoya R72 filter. Any tips you can provide on exposure are appreciated. Thanks!
    - Wayne Nolting

    See Wayne's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    You can certainly try the R72 filter, and I hope it works for you. All camera sensors are different and some can record infrared and some cannot. I tried a standard infrared filter on my Fuji S2 and got nothing or inconsistent results. There is a company, Harrison and Harrison, which makes infrared filters for specific digital cameras. They have no Web site, but do a Web search and their number will come up somewhere in the list. They made an infrared filter specifically for the S2, and it works like a charm. I'm sure that they make one for your Digital Rebel. Price is around $60. Good luck!
    - Tony Sweet

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    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
    Image Design: Revealing Your Personal Vision
    Fine Art Flower Photography
    Fall Course Extension with Tony Sweet

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11637

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11637

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 5: Shooting Concert Without Flash
    I have a concert performance (singers, dancers) to shoot in a few days, but they don't allow using flash. Plus, these may be used in a major music publication, so they really have to be good quality (focus and lighting). I've never shot action in low light without flash before. Any advice would be very appreciated! Thanks
    - Carrie Mai

    See Carrie's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    Well, they're expecting the impossible, Carrie. In order to stop action in low light, you'll need to use extremely fast film, like Kodak Tmax 3200 pushed to 6400 and shooting at your lenses widest aperture, which will give you minimal depth of field. This can work for good quality reproductions if the pictures are small in their publication. If they are serious about getting good, publishable images, ask that they turn the stage light WAY up and allow you to get close to the stage and use flash. Good luck!
    - Tony Sweet

    See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
    Image Design: Revealing Your Personal Vision
    Fine Art Flower Photography
    Fall Course Extension with Tony Sweet

    ANSWER 2:
    Thanks, Tony! But I forgot to mention as I thought I put this Q in the digital forum ... I'm using a D70 camera. With such a high ISO, will the noise level still be acceptable for final submission? Thanks again.
    - Carrie Mai

    See Carrie's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    Well, now it gets a bit complicated. You can use software like Noise Ninja, Grain Surgery, or nikMultimedia's Dfine to remove noise, but it may compromise image quality. But, I have used the Fuji S2 at ISO 1600 to photograph recording sessions, and it worked fine. I also used a film body with Tmax 3200 pushed to 6400, and the film versions were the preferred "look" by the client. The digital looked too "clean" and the grainy, fast, pushed film had more "character." You may want to consider shooting some things in low light to get an idea of how the camera reacts. The D70 is quite impressive and should work well. Good luck!
    - Tony Sweet

    See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
    Image Design: Revealing Your Personal Vision
    Fine Art Flower Photography
    Fall Course Extension with Tony Sweet

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11632

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11632

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 6: Printing Problem
    I am using Elements 2.0 and have a new HP 7960 printer. When I try to print a borderless 4x6, it keeps turning it into a 4x5.33. I can not get it to stay borderless. I set it up, hit preview, hit print and it turns out with white space on each end. Can somebody walk me through this so that I can do it right.
    - Jeff Hartman

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Jeff. You don't say what camera you're using. But I suspect that your problem is that the image aspect ratio is 4:3, which gives a print 5.33" x 4". A 6" x 4" print has an aspect ratio of 3:2.
    Most non-DSLR digitals have an image aspect ratio of 4:3 (same as TV). DSLRs usually have the "35m" aspect ratio of 3:2.
    You won't fit your 4:3 image onto a 6x4 print without either white ends, cropping the top and bottom, or distorting the long edge to fit.
    Hope this is some help.
    DC
    - Dave Cross

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11619

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11619

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 7: Selective Coloring
    I am interested in doing selective coloring with black and white photos. I would like to know what program I need to purchase for this. I have the Picture It program.
    - Kathy Gossage

    ANSWER 1:
    Just came across your question, Kathy, and thought I might give you some starting points. I used to have a program called MGI Photo Suite. It was a lower-priced program and had some neat features on it, but was quite basic. It did, however, allow me to do selective coloring. I use Jasc Paint Shop Pro 8 (and just got version 9 but haven't had a chance to try it yet). It is a pared-down version of the more expensive Adobe Photoshop and runs around $100. It has tons of features, options, effects, etc., and allows selective coloring in a variety of ways too.
    I am sure there are TONS of other programs out there, but those are the ones I am familiar with. Hope this helps :-)
    - Jan Stadelmyer

    See Jan's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11594

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 8: Where to Find Curves?
    I have Photoshop 2.0, and I don't know where to find the curves option.
    - Mike Carpenter

    See Mike's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    If you mean Photoshop Elements 2.0, Curves is not available in that program. You need a full copy of Photoshop to access Curves.
    - Lewis Kemper

    See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Lewis Kemper:
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #1
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #2
    Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Toolbox #3

    ANSWER 2:
    If it's Elements 2 you have, locate a copy of the old Photoshop LE, which often comes free with digital scanners and cameras, or is sold very cheap on auction sites. LE has curves. It's under Image/Image Adjust.
    - Doug Nelson

    Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11593

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11593

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 9: Lens Speed
    I have been reading about lenses and would like to understand more about "faster lenses". I currently use a Sigma 28-80mm lens the f-stop is 3.5-5.6. My goal is to find a lens that will be more adaptable to natural low light situations. Can any one help me with this?
    - Susan Schwarzell

    ANSWER 1:
    I don't know what brand of camera you are using. Nikon, Canon, Carl Zeiss, etc., have very good (expensive as well) fast lenses. Since you are using Sigma lenses, you might consider the following two: Sigma 24-70 F/2.8 EX DG DF, 28-70 F/2.8 EX DF.
    - Tom Kwan

    ANSWER 2:
    As far as the understanding part, if you haven't already, lenses are called faster simply because their bigger maximum aperture (as well as having a constant aperture) allows you to use a faster shutter speed.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    A "fast lens", by definition, is a lens with a large maximum aperture. 50mm prime lenses are the fastest around at 1.4 ... and some even to 1.2 ... (Canon used to make a 1.0, but I don't know if it's still around).
    For medium-telephotos, a 2.8 is considered fast. As the lens sizes get bigger, the maximum aperture size decreases progressively. At 400mm and beyond, anything faster than f-4 is ridiculously priced.
    Also, as a rule, zooms are slower (smaller maximum aperture) than prime lenses.

    Your best bet, given the current lens you have, is to get a standard (50mm) prime lens and simply move forward or backward to compose your shots rather than zooming. They are relatively cheap, extremely sharp, and great in low light. (As long as you stick with the name brands.)
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 4:
    Thank you all for your responses. They have helped me a lot.
    - Susan Schwarzell

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11587

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11587

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 10: Cameras and Magnets
    Not sure if this is the right area to ask but I just realized today that I had put my magnetic name badge into a bag with 5 rolls of used films. Are they just destroyed? Is there anything you can do to minimize the effect? How bad are magnets for films? Thanks.
    - Siobhan

    ANSWER 1:
    No effect. Film is unaffected by magnetic fields.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11573

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11573

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 11: How to Save Digital Pictures
    I am going on vacation and taking my digital camera along. Because I take a lot of photos, I have two memory cards. However, I know they will fill up fast, and I was wondering how to save my digital pics without having to print them out every day. I was thinking I could use something like a Kodak photo machine and save the photos on a CD. That way I can delete them off the card to free up more space and print and edit them when I get home. Will this work?
    - Amy

    ANSWER 1:
    Writing to CD is the best way, although a little time consuming. Digital wallets are great, too. Many have a viewing window so you can scroll through your images. I would consider taking three or 4 512M or 1G cards. They are very delicate hard drives and if you drop one or accidentally sit on one or drop one in the ocean, it may become inoperative and will need recovery software to pull the images from the damaged drive. Have fun!!
    - Tony Sweet

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    Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

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    Image Design: Revealing Your Personal Vision
    Fine Art Flower Photography
    Fall Course Extension with Tony Sweet

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11572

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11572

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 12: Checklist for First Wedding?
    Hi. I'm shooting my first wedding this Saturday, and I'm a bit nervous! I wonder if anyone would have a checklist for photographs that need to be taken or things that need to be done on the day. Any help, hints, or tips would be greatly appreciated!! Thank you.
    - Terry Lennox

    ANSWER 1:
    Terry,
    Here's what I can think of:
    Bride's dressing room before ceremony (candids), groom's getting ready (candids), coming down aisle, kissing, coming back down aisle, then posed shots of entire wedding party, just bride and groom together, bride only, bride with bridesmaids, grooms with groomsmen, bride and groom with her family, bride and groom with his family, bride and groom with pastor, bride and groom with grandparents, bride and groom with parents. Lots of candids at reception, dancing, cake, throwing bouquet and garter, small details like close up of centerpieces, flowers, etc.
    Hope this helps a little! Good luck!
    Cindy Bracken
    www.shuttermom.com
    - Cindy K. Bracken

    See Cindy's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Two things that are important for me:
    1. I list out my anticipated shots. I also make sure that, for example, before the ceremony I have a new roll in the camera - I don't want to be caught changing film during the procession.
    2. If you don't have an assistant, get one. My daughter started helping me out - she often saw things I didn't, like a flipped-up dress edge in a posed shot, or an out-of-the-way great candid. I also gave her my second camera, and she got some nice shots, candids as well as a different angle of the ceremony.
    I LOVE to shooting weddings! In spite of the stress, I think people are at their best, and it's sort of an honor to be included in that day. Have a great time!
    - Connie Niehaus

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 13: What Filter to Buy?
    I am planning to buy filters and thought I would go for a 58mm Hoya circular polarizer and a UV lens. I found various types of polarizer filters - like, multi-coated, ultra this, etc. - and I don't know what type to buy.
    - abitha sundararajan

    ANSWER 1:
    I favor Tiffen. That's what they use in Hollywood, and I've used a bunch and they are great. I think they are multicoated, but check the Tiffen.com site.
    - John C. Schwentner

    See John's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Hoya is a good brand, as is Tiffen - pretty good and reasonably priced.

    Multicoated filters will have better resistance to flare. Hoya has different lines of filters, see http://www.thkphoto.com/products/hoya/coatings.html - "Standard" is their economy line that are either single or uncoated, HMC/S-HMC/Ultra are multicoated. Tiffen makes coated and multicoated filters, but they (other makers) don't necessarily segment their line of filters based on that.

    "Slim" (Hoya calls theirs "Ultra") filters are specifically for wide-angle lenses, especially zooms covering 28mm or shorter focal lengths. These filters do not extend as far in front of the lens (usually by eliminating the front threads from the filter ring) to minimize the vignetting (darkened corners) that normal filters would cause.
    - Jon Close

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    *****


    NEW QUESTION 14: Gig Photography
    Hi all.
    I'm just starting out in shooting local gigs, now I've been doing it for years with a small camera using flash but now don't want to be using the flash all night in front of the bands. So far, I've picked up that I need a fast shutter speed (1/125 and above) and a high ISO film ... 800+?? Anyone got any more advice would be much appreciated, as would any advice on band/live photography! My camera is a Canon 300v, by the way. Thanks a million.
    - Niall G. Cronin

    ANSWER 1:
    http://www.photo.net/concerts/mirarchi/concer_i
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 2:
    The link that Jon sent is excellent, so I would definitely check it out indepth. But here's what I do when photographing at recording sessions, and it works well. I use Tmax 1600 pushed to 3200 or 6400. I shoot wide open or stopped 1-2 stops if possible. I use the Nikon 24-120 VR lens, which greatly increases sharpness at slow, handheld shutter speeds. If you use Canon, consider an I-S lens for the same reason. Good luck!
    - Tony Sweet

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: How to Get What You See?
    This is a silly question. However, I have a problem with hurrying when I am about to take a shot. I know people said to "just slow down," but I get to thinking I am going to miss it - even a posed shot. In doing so, I miss something on my camera settings, even though I believe at that time I have done everything and it's set correct for what I want. I think that my problem is that I get so excited about what a good shot this could be that it doesn't come out like it should. I love photography, but because of this one thing, I am getting so discouraged - losing a good shot because I get to hurrying. I hope that this makes sense, as the solution seems so easy, and I was just wondering if any one else has ever had this problem and even talked about it. I sure hope some one has a little trick or something that will help.
    - Paul

    ANSWER 1:
    No tricks.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    There is no magic. You must be patient. When you normally would press the shutter, stop, put the camera down at your side, and evaluate the subject. Think about what you are looking at and think of a way to make it a little better - like ask the subject to tilt his/her head a little to one side, or whatever.

    You have to slow down. The real key to great photography is that great photographers take a great deal of time setting up a shot. The best photographers make images that look as if they were taken "on the fly" but they weren't.

    I know you don't want to hear it, but you just simply have to slow down.

    Jerry
    - Jerry Frazier

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    ANSWER 3:
    Just identifying that you have a problem is half the battle (I sound like an AA spokesman).

    When I find myself hurrying, I immediately ask myself: "Is this my only chance ... or can I re-shoot this if I screw it up?"
    More often than not, I only get ONE chance at a great opportunity, and this thought forces me to slow down and concentrate on the basics of composition, exposure, focus, etc.


    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 4:
    Try a shotgun policy. I'd once used Nikon F5 set on cont.exp A mode to shoot boat racing. Only press the shutter once then let gone the entire roll of film 37 exposures with one take. I got an award out from 4 rolls of cont. exp film. I never did it again. Because nowadays it is easier to pick up one picture from a 3 min DV movie, and it seems to me that such trick is no more photography art.
    - Tom Kwan

    ANSWER 5:
    I find that if I'm anxious to get the shot in (in case the target might move), I take a quick first shot or two, and then take a second to re-evaluate (and double check my settings) before continuing. You don't want to miss your opportunity, but especially for a posed shot, there is no need to rush, and then find out later you messed up. It does help if you are using digital: You can see the immediate feedback on the LCD and make any adjustments necessary...
    Good luck!
    - Diane L. Dupuis-Kallos

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    ANSWER 6:
    Go out planning to shoot nothing, and see what shots come to you ... when they do, take a deep breath, and just go with it.
    - Damian Gadal

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    ANSWER 7:
    Yes, I had this problem also. I have to admit it still comes up every now and then.

    My thing when shooting 35mm is I'll take the shot so I know I have at least something, then I'll take some time on the second shot. This way I know I have something if I do miss the second chance. Of course, this is in cases where you can get a second shot.

    Beyond that, I try to think in terms of medium or large format. You normally only get one shot then. It can take all day to just set up one shot and you have to have it right. I would suggest doing that for a while. Go out to shoot, but shoot like you are only going to take one or two photos for the day. It really breaks the old habit and lets you spend the time you need. After a while, it will not bother you so much. At least it worked for me.
    - Kim

    ANSWER 8:
    I think you have something here with your answers. All of the answers were good. Thanks to all. I believe that after reading these, I have a better chance of getting a good shot than worrying about missing one ... I miss a lot now with hurrying. So it's got to be an improvement ... Again, thanks to all for the input. It will help me.
    - Paul

    ANSWER 9:
    Hi Paul: Wow, your question sure generated lots of excellent advice!! Yet another thought:

    For landscapes and other static scenes - i.e., subjects that aren't going anywhere - here's a technique that has worked for many people (including myself): Use a tripod ... regardless of the lighting conditions.

    Besides being an aid to image quality by keeping the camera rock-solid, a tripod can also help you fine-tune your compositions. The reason: A tripod forces you to slow down and consider your potential photograph ... after all, you'll want to figure out the best viewpoint or camera angle before going to the trouble of setting up the tripod. You may also find that this sort of tripod "training" helps you during all those times when you must handhold the camera - i.e., when shooting sports, portraits, wildlife, candids, whatever.

    Good luck, Paul, and all the best in your photography!
    Kerry
    - Kerry Drager

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    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: How to Store Images on CD
    After years of shooting film I have begun to shoot some of images with a digital camera. I recently purchased Photoshop Album, and I love its organizational features. I am a bit confused over the best method to back them up on CD or CDRW. As an old floppy guy, I like the ability to add new files whenever I desire. There appears to be no way to do this with any CD format. You have one shot or must erase everything and copy the old files over again on CDRW. Am I missing something?
    - Michael A. Dreese

    ANSWER 1:
    I ended up using external drives and zip disk to solve this problem. We also installed removable drives in all three computers, so that exchanging material from one computer to the other is a snap.
    - Dee E. Strellner

    ANSWER 2:
    An external hard drive is a good option, as are CDs or DVDs. However, CD-RWs don't last nearly as long as CDs, so I wouldn't use those. I feel like I've heard that zip disks don't last that long either, especially since they have moving parts. I'm looking into getting a large external hard drive myself.
    - Nancy Grace Chen

    See Nancy's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    An external big hard disk is a great option ... but it is a scary one. Just in case it fails or breaks down, you are in for a big-time loss. I had one break down - my 40 gb external drive - and nothing was recovered.
    - dipesh

    ANSWER 4:
    My wife and I take literally thousands of pics with our digital camera, and I store them all on a CD. We use a program called "nero" for burning them to a CD and are able to add pics to a CD until it is full. Hope this helps.
    - Brian

    ANSWER 5:
    I have tried various methods of saving and backing up. I have found that if you buy CDs in bulk, they are a little less expensive. With a regular CD, you won't lose photo quality like you will with the CD-RWs. The same thing applies with Zips. They tend to reduce quality as well, because they have moving parts and because they are added to over and over again.
    - Melanie Harris

    ANSWER 6:
    As has been mentioned, burning to CD-R allows for the addition of more files. The setting you need to find is burn the disk and "leave it open". Usually it's a check box choice. Some programs have it in the advanced section. The best part of CDRs is that the image cannot be erased by accident. Once the disk is full, I close it and then make a back-up of the full disk and store someplace else.
    - Michael Delehanaty

    ANSWER 7:
    DVD is the best option.
    - dipesh

    ANSWER 8:
    Michael,
    I have done extensive research on the whole CD, DVD, R versus RW, etc., for work. The bottom line is that the RW version of DVD and CDs don't have the shelf life of the Write-once versions. Typically RWs have a life of about 20-30 years when stored correctly, while the R's have a shelf life of about 35-50 years. Once again if stored properly. The Write-once versions do offer the extra security of the fact that you can't accidentally erase the material. I would have to agree that DVD is probably the best format to use considering current technologies. And let's face it, there will probably be some new format to store our data by the time the DVDs have deteriorated to the point of not being able to retrieve the data. So data migration will be necessary regardless.
    - James P. Albert

    ANSWER 9:
    Thanks to everyone for the responses. I had no clue there were so many options. I have a program called Sonic Now, a CD/DVD burning program. I did see a setting in the advanced section that allows you to keep adding new files.
    Someone told me this evening that you can only add new data to CD-RWs. There are a lot of misconceptions out there, and with the technology evolving so rapidly this is not surprising.
    My major goal at this point is to follow a manageable work flow, so that I can spend more time outdoors and less time on my computer.
    - Michael A. Dreese

    ANSWER 10:
    Hi Michael,
    As the others have said, R is better than RW as far as reliability and longevity, but that does not stop you from using it as temporary storage until you get enough pictures to fill a CD or DVD. You can save them to the -RW and when the disk is full, copy them to a -R. DVD is certainly becoming the standard but if you use a smaller PnS camera which shoots JPG files, you can still get so many pictures on a CD that the extra volume of the DVD may be unnecessary. I now shoot with a 8MP DSLR in RAW, which has about a 8MB file size. I then save as TIF in either 8bit or 16bit mode, which gives me a 24MB or 48MB file. I then edit and save again as PSD, TIF or JPG. With these file sizes; DVD is the only way to go.

    Even if you decided to go with a larger HD (internal or external), I would still back them up to CD/DVD. If the HD crashes, you have either lost all of your pictures or have to pay thousands of dollars to have the data removed from the good parts of the drive platters. It may also help to get a good program to keep track of your photos and where they are. I use a program called iMatch, which makes finding your pictures easy. But there are many others like ACDSee or Photoshop Album.
    Michael Kaplan
    Canon EOS-20D
    http://www.pbase.com/mkaplan

    - Michael Kaplan

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