BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, September 06, 2004
~~~~~~~~~~~

* SPOTLIGHT: Photo of the Day: New Daily Newsletter Kicks Off!
* BETTERPHOTO: Check Out Our Fall Schedule of Online Courses!
* BETTERPHOTO: Capture Great Wildlife Photos - in Utah!
* BETTERPHOTO: Promote Your Portfolio of Photos in a Deluxe BetterPholio™
* FEATURED GALLERY: Putting the Focus on Ducks, Geese, and Swans
* FEATURED PLACE: Arizona: A State Filled with Grand Scenery
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Early Photography / First Cover
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Success in Stock Photography ... by Charlie Borland
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Explain TIFF, JPEG and PSD
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Cataloging Software
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Scanning Prints to CD - And Printability
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Selling Photos and Income Taxes
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: DVD Slide Shows
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Sunlight Blocking Subject on Screen
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Photographing Sports ... With a Lens Hood
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: PSP or PSE?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Photoshop and Filters
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Salable Prints
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Making Photographs More Interesting
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Saving Mac or PC
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: Is the Sidelighting Effective?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 14: Shooting Inside a Dark Environment
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 15: Sunset and Sunrise
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 16: Apertures and Shutter Speeds
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 17: Best Ways of Shooting the Moon
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 18: Photoshop CS and Photo Editing
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Getting Clearer Pictures
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Shooting in National Parks - Permit Needed?


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Photo of the Day: New Daily Newsletter Kicks Off!
Our new daily newsletter, Photo of the Day, begins this Tuesday (yes, September 7th!) and will serve as a daily showcase of outstanding pictures! The images are selected from either our monthly photo contest or from the excellent work of our online course instructors. In addition to being inspired by awe-inspiring images each day, you'll receive brief announcements and occasional photo tips from our team of instructors. To learn more or to subscribe, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp

If you haven't yet suscribed, then go to the POTD archives and check out the first issue. You can get to it via the newsletter subscription page, but here's the direct link:
http://www.betterphoto.com/Photo-of-the-Day.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to the 176th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

We are thrilled about the launch of our free daily newsletter, Photo of the Day. We hope you will enjoy this awesome new email treat - every day! Of course, Photo of the Day is free, but you'll have to sign up for it. Subscribe today at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp

In this issue of SnapShot, we have a great lineup. Check out the Featured Place for a wonderful photo tour of Arizona, featuring the images of BetterPhoto instructors and members. In his photo tip, instructor Charlie Borland discusses how to become a successful stock shooter. Don't miss our Featured Gallery on some popular BetterPhoto subjects: ducks, geese, and swans. Lastly, our questions and answers are interesting and educational - as always.

That's it for now. Have a great week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Check Out Our Fall Schedule of Online Courses!
BetterPhoto's lineup of online courses includes something for just about everyone - from novice to advanced. The courses cover such subjects as: beginning photography, composition and the art of seeing, digital photography, shooting technique, business and marketing, lighting and exposure, and a nice variety of Photoshop and specialty subjects.

In addition to our regular 8-week classes, we are launching our new short-course program ... 4-week online "Short Courses"! These classes will focus on a variety of specialty subjects and will run twice each session. If you need help selecting a photo class, use our new Course Finder (on BetterPhoto's home page) or go directly to our Course Categories page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


*****
Capture Great Wildlife Photos - in Utah!
Join BetterPhoto founder Jim Miotke for an awesome adventure: photographing wildlife in the red rock country of Southern Utah April 13th - April 16th, 2005. This combo workshop - a unique on-location and online adventure - offers photographers the chance to record wildlife models in an array of natural settings. You'll take creative advantage of the beautiful and convincing backgrounds for your animal pictures. Just imagine the possibilities: photographing animals such as grizzly bear, mountain lion and kittens, wolves, bobcat, black bear ... all in natural surroundings. Plus, there's a bonus "Birds of Prey" session! For more information on the Digital Wildlife Photography combo workshop with Jim Miotke, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/_cws/digital-wildlife-photography-Utah.asp



*****
Promote Your Portfolio of Photos in a Deluxe BetterPholio™
With a Deluxe BetterPholio™, you can show off up to 1000 of your best images, set up slide shows, and create the look and feel you want! Our Deluxe BetterPholio™ solutions give you a ONE STOP SHOP for getting your portfolio on the Web. What's more, people can search for your photos via a search engine! And if you opt for the Image Sales option, you can sell your images via the Internet! Learn more at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/deluxeWebsites.asp

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FEATURED GALLERY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Putting the Focus on Ducks, Geese, and Swans
Check the contest finalists and winners of just about any month, and you'll see some fantastic captures of these birds by BetterPhoto photographers. And the list of compositional and lighting techniques is a seemingly endless one. For instance, see ducks, geese, or swans recorded in close-up portraits, great reflections, stark silhouettes, in graceful flight, while taking off or landing, and while swimming, walking, or just relaxing. Also, look for the babies - oh so cute, fuzzy (literally!), and cuddly - and entire families.
For shooting hints and inspiration, check out BetterPhoto's gallery on ducks, geese, and swans at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=533

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FEATURED PLACE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Arizona: A State Filled with Grand Scenery
Light and color are two adjectives that come to mind when thinking of the great state of Arizona. Checking out the fantastic work of BetterPhoto instructors and members, and you'll see exactly what we mean. In fact, this land in the U.S. Southwest may feature the Grand Canyon, but it also offers so many more awesome areas to shoot.
For lots of visual inspiration, don't miss the "Arizona Pictures" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=1125

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Last week, we asked:
The Calotype process - discovered by William Henry Fox Talbot in the 1800s - has been called a "direct forerunner of modern photography" because it involved both a negative and a positive. What does the word itself (Calotype) mean?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Janet D. is:
The word Calotype comes from kalos, which is Greek for beautiful and typos which means type. Very interesting process. Thank you for a great trivia question.

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - First Cover - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

What was the subject of Margaret Bourke-White's photo that made the first Life magazine cover in 1936?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Success in Stock Photography ... by Charlie Borland
Like all stock photos, the success and appeal of an image depends on the subject and the skill of the photographer. Today’s stock photographers have to be determined, aware, and able to respond to a constantly changing world. You must be aware of changing lifestyles, demographics, trends, fashions, technologies, etc. The most successful stock photographer will almost have an ability to see into the future and foresee coming changes in these areas. They will have good “instinct” to upcoming subject demands and have produced images that are already available when these trends become hot. Your camera ... never leave home without it!

Take Charlie Borland's online course:
Stock Photography

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:

  • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
  • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
  • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NEW QUESTION 1: Explain TIFF, JPEG and PSD
Would someone mind explaining in simple terms the how's, when's and why's of TIFF, JPEG, and PSD? I am just getting the hang of digital photography. There seems to be sooo many different terms and ways of doing things it gets confusing.
At this point I take the shots, come home and upload them to a file as originals and always save them in JPEG. I then burn this to a CD as originals in the JPEG form. When I can go back, I reopen the folder, mess with the files in PS6 and resave in JPEG form, then burn again to a CD for printing.
I just read something that said, "JPEG compression is perfect transient files for sending to the lab for printing, but avoid using the compression as a working file type." This is exactly what I have been doing.
So can someone give me the exact step by step details for uploading, saving, working in PS, then saving, and finally printing? Also, is there a difference in how a file should be saved when prints are uploaded to a lab vs. copied to CD and taken to a lab?
Thanks so much for anyone's help!!!
- Dede Carver

ANSWER 1:
TIFF is an uncompressed file. If you have a original JPEG, and you plan on doing a lot of Photoshop stuff, it's best to save the JPEG when you first download it as a TIFF. So each time you resave after you've done something to it, you don't lose anything.

JPEG is compressed, and can be different levels of compression. If you shoot the original as JPEG, it's fine to save as the highest level of JPEG. Minor changes with Photoshop won't effect the quality (such as lighten or darken, then saving). However, you don't gain anything if you have JPEG saved on hard drive, then change it to TIFF. But it is best if you're going to do cut/paste, lots of filter effects, drastic color changes, even if it's shot JPEG, to (right after download) first save it as TIFF.

PSD is a Photoshop format that when you open it, it will activate Photoshop if it's on your computer. (And if you're wondering, you can put a PSD-saved image on a computer and instantly get Photoshop.) It saves layers for unflattened images if you haven't finished doing whatever to it. It allows you to embed captions in the file (not meaning visible in the image) and any other info you might need.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11419

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11419

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Cataloging Software
Hi all ... I need a software to catalogue and organize my pics. Any suggestions? Thanks a lot :)
Silvia (from Italy)

- Silvia Ganora

ANSWER 1:
Extensis Portfolio is one of the best. There is also another one called Digi Pro.
Charlie Borland
www.borlandphoto.com
- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11418

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11418

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Scanning Prints to CD - And Printability
I want to scan some older photos and save them on CDs for my family. I also want the family to be able to print out any they'd like. Is there a good guideline for dpi and image size to do this successfully?
- Connie Niehaus

ANSWER 1:
If you are scanning prints, scan at about 300 dpi (otherwise known as samples per inch, SPI). Then people can print them out at 300 dpi. Save as 8 bit per channel (total 24 bit) RGB TIFF ... that is, if they are in color. If B/W, save as 8-bit grayscale TIFF.
Vince
www.PhotoAgo.com
- Vince Broesch

ANSWER 2:
TY, Vince (TIFF as opposed to JPEG?)
- Connie Niehaus

ANSWER 3:
JPEG makes neat small files, but at the cost of tossing out data. If a file is going to be printed, it is best to save as TIFF. The file will be much larger, but there is no loss of the data, which is so important in printing. Since you are writing to CD, the larger file size should not be as much of a concern as the print quality. Also, a TIFF can later be opened, edited and saved with no loss of quality, whereas a JPEG will lose even more quality with each edit/save that it goes through.
Vince
www.PhotoAgo.com


- Vince Broesch

ANSWER 4:
Oh, boy. This is probably Photography 101, but you've just answered a question I had about some pictures I fooled and fooled and FOOLED with that ended up blurry and undefined. Now I know why. Thanks a million!!
- Connie Niehaus

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11407

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11407

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Selling Photos and Income Taxes
If I'm lucky, I shoot a wedding a year and maybe one or two senior shoots. I can clear $300 for my time on the wedding and maybe $20 on the seniors. I want to increase my business, but I'm wondering at what point I need to keep track of income and expenses for the IRS. The correct answer is probably "always," but is there a sensible and reasonable answer as well?
- Connie Niehaus

ANSWER 1:
Just do it and keep track of everything for your Schedule C. You can deduct anything you use photographically in the business - including part of your house/office to a point, and your travel expenses and overnight lodging and meals (even entertainment if it's the customer). Just make sure to charge enough. Rule of thumb is: The more gross, the more net.Charge commensurate with your skill
- John C. Schwentner

ANSWER 2:
Better check real good on the home office deductions. I think there are some things about what really makes a home office - like if it's every used for any other reason, it nullifies it as a home office.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11406

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11406

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 5: DVD Slide Shows
Can anyone tell me which program they prefer for making photo slide shows that can be played on the DVD? I'd like to buy one that gives you some editing choices but is simple to use. Thanks.
- Jana

ANSWER 1:
Kim Komando wrote an article about this a week or so ago in her electronic newsletter ... You make be able to find information about it on her Web site: komando.com
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
I use "DVD Pictureshow" and bought it at Best Buy.
Charlie Borland
www.borlandphoto.com
- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11394

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11394

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Sunlight Blocking Subject on Screen
I can't see subject when taking pictures outside - too much sunlight.
- Wendell Woolford

ANSWER 1:
Does the camera have a viewfinder?
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
The one unfortunate downfall of the LCD screen. Well, the easiest thing I can think of is just to cup it with your hand to keep some light away from it. Some people say take a finished toilet paper roll and place it over the screen and then look down into it, but plan to look really weird and awkward. There are companies that actually sell little covers to go over the screen to cut down on the light, but you're gonna have to pay.
- Steven Chaitoff

ANSWER 3:
Here's a wild thought, but it would work: Try looking at it under a towel.
- Scott

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11392

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11392

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Photographing Sports ... With a Lens Hood
Should I use a lens hood when photographing a high school soccer game? What would the difference be in using a lens hood and not? The camera I have is a Canon Elan 7e with a Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS USM lens. The games are played at night under lights and also during the day.
- Belinda Reeves

ANSWER 1:
You don't have to. Unless you see some glare from shooting towards the sun, it's not going to do anything to how the picture looks. Otherwise, if it rains or to protect the front lens are the only things you'd need it for.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11390

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11390

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 8: PSP or PSE?
Let me just start by saying that I love GIMP - the free editing software. But I can't get it to use some plugins I really want (buzz) ... so I'm going to spend some money on PS Elements or Paint Shop Pro.
PS Elements drives me nuts because the color representation is totally off! Is there a way to fix this? I just want it to look like it will look in every other program, but for some reason in Elements or any other PS program everything looks oversaturated and dark.
How bout JASC PSP? Anybody like that? Both use the effects I want to try ... am open to suggestions.
- Karma Wilson

See Karma's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
I've used PSP for years - and love it! No matter what else I try, I always come back. You should download a trial, and play around. The trial is fully functional for 60 days - plenty of time to decide. Hope this helps!
- Anne House

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11376

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11376

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 9: Photoshop and Filters
I have been shooting digitally in camera raw. When I import the image into Photoshop CS, I no longer am able to use all of the filters. Only a couple of filters will open, such as the blur filters, but not all of those either. Even if I then take the camera raw image and save it as a TIFF, I am still not able to access any creative filters. However, if I start with a JPEG, then all of the filters on Photoshop are available to use. Does anyone know anything about this problem and what I can do? I would like to be able to apply filters to some of my TIFF images.
- Beverly A. Burke

ANSWER 1:
Beverly, I am willing to bet that when you import your images into CS you are importing them as 16 bit images, and not all the filters work in 16 bit. You have to go to Image>Mode and change the image to 8 bit to get all the filters to work. I suggest you do any major exposure or color changes to the image while it is still in 16 bit and then change it.
- Lewis Kemper

See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #1
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #2

ANSWER 2:
Lewis, thank you. I followed your instruction, and that was exactly the problem. Thank you so much. I am planning to take one of your Toolbox classes this fall as I definitely need to learn some of the finer details of Photoshop use. I'm probably going to start with Toolbox #1. Is it geared for intermediates or beginners?
- Beverly A. Burke

ANSWER 3:
I would say you need to be familiar with the program a bit to take my class - not really an intermediate, but not a novice either. I do explain all the techniques, but I do not spend a lot of time teaching the tools, etc. I expect you to know what the lasso tool is, where the filters are, etc. I hope that helps - if not, please ask me again!
- Lewis Kemper

See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #1
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #2

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11375

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11375

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 10: Salable Prints
Is there an ink jet printer out there that has quality good enough to sell prints to the public? Or should I shell out the bucks for a laser, or dye sub?
- patrick patton

ANSWER 1:
Folks, myself included, have been selling inkjet prints made from Epson printers for several years now. Any of the printers with the Ultrachrome ink will do. They include the 2200, 4000, 7600 and 9500.
- Lewis Kemper

See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #1
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #2

ANSWER 2:
We do all our prints on the Epson 2200 ... excellent quality but can only print up to a 13X19 (which is non-standard) but can print up to 13X44. The 4000 will be our step up hopefully in the next year, for it can handle the more standard size like 16X20. I have not had anyone unhappy with their prints from the Epson 2200
Jill :)
- Jill A. Johnson

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11372

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11372

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 11: Making Photographs More Interesting
Hi, I've seen so many photos on this Web site that are so eye-catching! How do you do it? I've realized that I have beautiful portraits of people, but what makes a photo stand out? Does Photoshop make it interesting, or is it just the way it's captured? How much, on average, is Photoshop? Thanks for any info.
- Sarah cordes

ANSWER 1:
Think background and lighting. Before you compose a portrait, still-life, or scenic, think about what shape, color, or design you can put behind your subject to make it stand out, and how your subject will be illuminated.
Even the simplest objects can be made interesting and eye-catching with dramatic lighting and by including a contrasting background element.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11371

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11371

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 12: Saving Mac or PC
After editing in PE2 and I choose to save my file, I have an option whether to save as PC or Mac. If I save as Mac then create a CD, will the files be able to be shown on Mac computers? I have a PC, but would like to submit a CD to a publisher who accepts images formatted for Mac. Sounds like a dumb question, but I'm not sure. Thanks!
- Darlene Christensen

See Darlene's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Darlene, I assume you are saving TIFF files and have the choice. As long as they are being opened in Photoshop Elements or full version, they will be able to be opened by either platform. The trouble will come if a Windows machine running another ap such as Word, or something will not be able to access the Windows files. So if they are using a version of Photoshop it really will not matter.
- Lewis Kemper

See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #1
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #2

ANSWER 2:
Yes, I'm saving TIFF files. Thanks so much for your response, Lewis ... that answers my question!
- Darlene Christensen

See Darlene's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11370

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11370

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 13: Is the Sidelighting Effective?
I have uploaded 2 photographs I took on a sunny day. I shot one photo with frontlighting and one with low-angled sidelight. Is the sidelighting effective? Does it give more depth to the image?
Comments or suggestions welcome. Thanks!
- Frank P. Luongo

See Frank's Premium BetterPholio™

See Sample Photo - Park Bridge:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=520974

ANSWER 1:
Frank, the first image is not entirely front lit. You can see the diagonal drift of the shadows indicating that while the light was more from the front than from the side, it was still high enough of an angle to create those shadows. This is GOOD - it makes this picture better than if it were directly lit with no shadows...
In the second, sidelit one, you have lost the graphic effect by having such a dark shadow in the right corner, and that changes things. Your composition from the side is more interesting, but the lighting fell apart in that one.
You might want to rethink your understanding of frontlit vs. sidelit. You're close, but remember that frontlit means when the sun is directly and evenly hitting your subject face on. (br>Hope this helps!
- Brenda Tharp

See Brenda Tharp's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Brenda Tharp's Web Site - BrendaTharp.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Brenda Tharp:
Creating Visual Impact
Beyond the Postcard: Travel Photography

ANSWER 2:
Thanks, Brenda! I appreciate your expert opinion. As it happens I just began to cover light in my photo course at NYIP.
However, for additional training would you recommend the course "Mastering Light" at BetterPhoto?
- Frank P. Luongo

See Frank's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Yes, I would recommend Jim's class on lighting. He's a great photographer and a teacher by all accounts. Other classes (like mine) cover lighting, but his is entirely focused on light. Good luck to you!
- Brenda Tharp

See Brenda Tharp's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Brenda Tharp's Web Site - BrendaTharp.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Brenda Tharp:
Creating Visual Impact
Beyond the Postcard: Travel Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11366

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11366

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 14: Shooting Inside a Dark Environment
I recently photographed a wedding. I did not use my flash unit. I used 800 color print film. I believe I used an f/stop of f22, shutter 1/30. I don't know what I was thinking but I got a lot of blurred photos while the wedding processing was making their way down the aisle. What should I have done differently? Should I have just shot the church shots in Automatic mode?
- Juliette Colpa-Thomas

See Juliette's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Juliette-
I am not a wedding photographer but have done commercial advertising photography for 25 years. I would not use F/22. You need a shutter speed of at least 1/125 if you are shooting the people walking up the aisle to stop the movement, no matter the f/stop. I also think most wedding shooters use a flash. But if you use 1/125 at f/5.6, or f/4, you will have a sharp wedding couple. Slow shutter speeds mean blurry pictures.
Charlie Borland
www.borlandphoto.com

- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography

ANSWER 2:
Thanks, Charlie. I wanted to get the back of the church in sharp focus so I thought I'd use f/22. But you are right, of course, about the slow shutter speed and blurry pictures. Thanks again.
- Juliette Colpa-Thomas

See Juliette's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Did you use a tripod at all? Basic rule of thumb is no handholding the camera for SS slower than 1/125. I too am a commercial photographer, so most of my subjects are still. Regards, Annie
- R.M. Fusco

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11365

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11365

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 15: Sunset and Sunrise
Hi. I have a few questions.
1. To photograph a sunset/sunrise, I read that it is better to meter off of the left or right side of the sun. So, to get a better shot, I have to get the settings from the either side, then change it to Manual or Aperture mode and set both settings or the aperture and then compose my picture?
2. What is the best film to capture both views (sunrise is much brighter than sunset, I think )?
Thank you.
- Vadim Boriskevich

ANSWER 1:
Yes, metering from either side of where the sun is, and not including it in your exposure reading, is a good way to get a better exposure for sunrise/sunsets. You would have to either lock the exposure if you are in "auto" modes, or change it manually so it doesn't shift when you recompose your picture.
As to films, the print films will give you more latitude for extreme exposures like this, but slide films can also capture it.
Good luck!
- Brenda Tharp

See Brenda Tharp's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Brenda Tharp's Web Site - BrendaTharp.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Brenda Tharp:
Creating Visual Impact
Beyond the Postcard: Travel Photography

ANSWER 2:
I concur with Brenda's recommendations, to record the sunrise/set as closely as possible to how it appeared to the naked eye. If there are white clouds present, meter off a blue area of the sky (without the sun in the frame). This will help to bring out more detail if you are including foreground elements. And full-manual, with a tripod, is the best way to do this.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Thank you. What speed film should I use for better results?
- Vadim Boriskevich

ANSWER 4:
Any print or slide film designed for outdoor use will work. Slow films (100 ISO and lower) will show less grain.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 5:
Bob,
I thought 100 is for a bright and sunny days ... Thanks, I'll try it and let you know. I just bought Jim's book for beginners and reading. Got to start wasting some film and practice.
- Vadim Boriskevich

ANSWER 6:
100 speed is great for landscapes, sunsets, etc., but it does require longer shutter speeds ... (which shouldn't matter, if you are using your tripod.) Good luck "practicing", and don't forget to bracket exposures.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11360

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11360

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 16: Apertures and Shutter Speeds
Hi there. I'm very new to photography and I'm having real problems with understanding when to use certain apertures and shutter speeds. I've tried reading up on the subject, but still I can't grasp the fundamentals of this subject. Is there any way that someone could explain to me in as simple terms as possible how and when you know what to use. I'm sure some of you use some unwritten rules that you go by. Your advice would be much appreciated. Thank you in advance.
- Graham Joyce

ANSWER 1:
This may help:

http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/QnAdetail.asp?threadID=11132
- Andy Szeto

ANSWER 2:
Graham-
Here are some basic suggestions:
- 1/60 of a second shutter speed is considered the threshold shutter speed. If you use a slower shutter speed of 1/30, 1/15, all the way to 1/second, you need to use a tripod as your handholding vibration could result in blurry pictures. You use these shutter speeds when you want to blur action, panning with a moving subject, or shooting a waterfall.
- On the other side of 1/60 are 1/125, 1/250, and so on. These are fast shutter speeds, in which you can handhold your camera. These are used for stopping action: a skier in mid-air, a race car, etc.
- Now your aperture's effect on your pictures is basically related to the depth of your focus. The simplest way to explain would be if you laid a tape measure on the ground and focused on 12 feet. At f/22, you would see (this is hypothetical for the explanation) 8 feet and 20 feet on the tape measure, in focus. At f/2.8 and focused on 12 feet, you would see 10 1/2 feet and 14 feet in focus and everything before and after out of focus. So the larger the number on the lens, the smaller the aperture size, the greater the depth of focus, or field. The smaller the aperture number, the bigger the aperture size, and the lesser of depth of focus. Also keep in mind that if you meter your subject, and it says f/8 at 1/60 second and you want more depth of field, that f/11 at 1/30, f/16 at 1/15, f/22 at 1/8 are all the same exposure.
Charlie Borland
www.borlandphoto.com
- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography

ANSWER 3:
The latter of Charlie's explanation is called reciprocity. You can change the aperture to change the DOF, as long as you follow with a change in SS.
- R.M. Fusco

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11358

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11358

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 17: Best Ways of Shooting the Moon
Every picture I ever try to take of the moon never turns out very well. If it looks like picture perfect shot and then I take it. It never turns out to be anything to keep. Any suggestions. I am just a beginner. Is it easier than I'm making it out to be?
- Matthew Statzer

ANSWER 1:
Try different shutter speeds. Are you shooting the moon all by itself?
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

See Sample Photo - Moon 1/500:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=520388

See Sample Photo - Moon 1/400:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=520387

ANSWER 2:
Well. Yes, it is by itself, but I'm having to do it without a tripod.
- Matthew Statzer

ANSWER 3:
With a faster shutter speed, you can get away with not using a tripod.
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
Just practice with a few shutter settings on a decent sized moon. You'll be able to tell what works best for you in short order.
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 5:
Well, my problem is weird to me. The moon looks big enough to me to get a fairly good shot out of and then when I actually get the shot of it, the moon itself is too small to show any detail. But the picture is 1024:768..
- Matthew Statzer

ANSWER 6:
Matthew-
If you want a really big moon in the frame, you need a really big lens, maybe a telescope with a camera adapter. There is a basic rule for shooting a full moon. It is also the sunny 16 rule of 1/ISO @ f/16. If you are shooting film and the ISO is 100, that would be f/16 at 1/125. Of course, if I was handholding the camera, I would use the same exposure at different settings like 1/500 at f/8 or 1/1000 at f/5.6.
Charlie Borland
www.borlandphoto.com
- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography

ANSWER 7:
I agree with Charlie B. I have had success using a telescope as well as with a 80-200mm lens. I used my Canon EOS650 with a telescope, only I did not have an adapter, so I handheld it up to the eyepiece (takes some practice and patience, but it can be done). I have also recently used my Digital Rebel with the 80-200mm lens (with a little digital flare added) handheld. I have included both shots as examples. So don't give up. Keep trying!
- Bill Hollingsworth

See Sample Photo - Moon 2:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=521808

See Sample Photo - Moon 1:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=521807

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11355

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11355

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 18: Photoshop CS and Photo Editing
I was watching some TV show that had a Photoshop expert on. He showed how to remove a background from a picture using a copy of the red channel. I do not know what he did next, but the results were much better than I can get with the magic wand, or extract tool. He pulled his kids from an outdoor photo and kept all their hair. Help? See my not-so-good samples.
- Ken R. Edwards

See Sample Photo - Changed Background:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=518796

See Sample Photo - Original:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=518795

ANSWER 1:
Ken, it may not always be the red channel. He was making a channel mask to make the selection. Pick the channel with the most contrast between your subject and the background (this only works if there is good contrast difference!). Then you copy that channel. Then run levels on that channel to force everything to black and white (pay attention to the hair). Then CMD/CNTRL click on the channel, and a selection will be made.
There is a whole lesson pertaining to this and other techniques for masking in Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop 2 starting next session here on BetterPhoto.
- Lewis Kemper

See Lewis Kemper's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Lewis Kemper's Web Site - LewisKemper.com
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #1
Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop®: Toolbox #2

ANSWER 2:
Thanks, Lewis, I will give that a try.
- Ken R. Edwards

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11337

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11337

back to top

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Getting Clearer Pictures
I recently purchased a Sony Mavica MCD 500 and am having a few problems. This is my first "serious" digital camera after using a Nikon 35mm for many years. It seems that many of my shots are just not that clear. Some turn out just great while some seem to be fuzzy. Could this be due to how still I am holding the camera while shooting? I do mostly nature photography and hate the thought of dragging a tripod with me on every shoot. Any suggestions from members here would be greatly appreciated. I can also be reached at studiogd@up.net as I am not sure how this online Q&A thing works. I will check back each day to see if I can find answers. Also, are there any good books that deal with this camera that might help me?
I love the camera and really want to be able to use to it's full potential.
Best Regards.
- Arin Brown

ANSWER 1:
Hi Arin.
I suspect that (since you are doing nature) you have the "smart-zoom" enabled. This is not smart! -since any digital zoom degrades the picture significantly. Disable smart zoom. If you then are too far away from your subject, either get closer or get one of the add-on telephoto attachments (I am assuming they are available for this camera).
You don't need a tripod. Carry a small beanbag, so you can use walls, rocks, trees, etc., to steady the camera. If you use the beanbag, you will also be able to use one of the lower ISO settings of the camera. The ISO 400 tends to be rather noisy on these tiny CCD imagers.
Let us know how you get on.
Cheers
DC

- Dave Cross

ANSWER 2:
The basic theory is that you can handhold a camera 1/lens focal length - so if you were shooting at, let's say, 102mm (your camera's zoon has a 35mm equivalent of 34 - 102mm) you would have to be shooting at least 1/125 second. That is only an average. Some people can hold it much slower and others, especially if you are new to this, should have the speed even faster.
There are tricks to be able to get the speed up if you are not shooting in daylight, You raise the ISO. Normally people shoot in daylight at ISO 100. This will give you the lowest amount of noise. For each change in ISO you get 1 rise in speed so if you were only able to shoot at 1/60th sec, moving the ISO to 200 would give you 1/125th, and moving it up to ISO 400 would allow you to shoot at 1/250. This will allow you to get sharper pictures while handholding the camera.
For this, you would either shoot in manual mode and adjust the exposure yourself or the easier Av (aperture) mode where you can leave the aperture set wide open (F2.0-2.5 depending on your zoom), and the camera would give you the fastest speed it can for proper exposure.
A tripod, though, is still the best method or, as DC said, a tree, a step, a car ... anything you can use to brace yourself or the camera to make it steady.
Michael Kaplan
Canon EOS-20D
http://www.pbase.com/mkaplan
- Michael Kaplan

ANSWER 3:
I have a 10X zoom on my camera, and in low light conditions I need a tripod or rest. But I have learned that if I use the optical instead of the LCD to compose my pictures I can "brace" the camera against my forehead and my pictures are MUCH, MUCH more clear. I use my zoom a LOT, and I don't use my tripod much at all. My husband can get clear pictures at full zoom in low light, because he's a hunter and has a VERY steady hand at any type of shooting, including with the camera. But I use the optical view, and it's improved me. The other benefit is lower battery drainage.
- Karma Wilson

See Karma's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11281

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11281

back to top

*****


CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Shooting in National Parks - Permit Needed?
Do you need to obtain permission if you are going to sell photographs that you have taken at a national park or any public park or garden?
- Joy Carey

Visit photosbyjoy.com - Joy's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Joy,
I have shot in the national parks for more than 25 years and have sold hundreds of images. I have never had a permit, sought permission, nor did I ever believe I was required to. Title 36, Section 5.5 of the U.S. Commercial Code, which covers photography and filming within the National Park system, states that permits are required for "photographing and filming when models and crews are used". So if you were to go to a park with models and an assistant, you might be challenged and be required to have a permit. And selling pictures of any government land, as far as I know, does not require permissions or permits.
Charlie Borland
www.borlandphoto.com
- Charlie Borland

See Charlie Borland's Premium BetterPholio™

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Charlie Borland:
Stock Photography

ANSWER 2:
You know, I'm thinking as the national parks belong to all of us, so a permit is not needed.
- Scott

ANSWER 3:
Joy,
This link might be helpful. Check out:
http://www.nps.gov/dena/home/visitorinfo/programs/propho/cfguidelines.html

This talks about the professional photography program, but it also covers regular photography for visitors.
- Phillip L. Sauvey

See Phillip's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11272

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11272

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ASK YOUR OWN QUESTION ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ask a question or answer a few from your fellow photographers:
http://www.betterphoto.com/qnaTOC.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
READ PAST ISSUES OF THE SNAPSHOT NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read previous issues of SnapShot in the BetterPhoto archives:
http://www.betterphoto.com/snapshots.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SIGN UP TO PHOTOFLASH AND THE DIGITAL PICTURE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join the fun and master the arts of traditional or digital photography! Participate or follow along as we discuss topics & lessons, practice assignments, and offer feedback on each others' work. Subscribe to our other two free newsletters - PhotoFlash and the Digital Darkroom - at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Get word of your product or service out to our rapidly growing list of 35837 subscribers.

Learn more about advertising in SnapShot at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/g/advertise.asp

Until next week, happy shooting!

Thank you,
Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you would rather not receive SnapShot, you may unsubscribe at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeun.asp?e=

To change your email address, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeCOA.asp?e=

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Copyright 2005 BetterPhoto.com - All Rights Reserved. No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission.

Copyright © 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc.® All Rights Reserved.