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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Sunday, August 15, 2004
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* SPOTLIGHT: Combo Workshop: Photograph Oregon with Charlie Borland
* BETTERPHOTO: Master Digital Photography ... with Peter Burian!
* BETTERPHOTO: Enjoy a Season of Learning and Shooting
* BETTERPHOTO: View July's Showcase of Contest Winners
* FEATURED GALLERY: Picturing the Majestic Birds of Prey
* FEATURED PLACE: Alaska: Big, Bold, and Beautiful
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Henri Cartier-Bresson, 1908-2004 / Mistakes Happen
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Still Reluctant to Try Digital? By Shawn R. Olszewski
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Shooting Lightning
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: How to Take Night City Pictures
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Wedding Photography - Last-Minute Tips?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Upping the EV and Noise
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Buying A Digital Camera: Shutter Delay?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Beginner ... Help Please!
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Shooting Skaters in a Dark Rink
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: How to Fix Flash Caught in Eyeglasses
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: TIFF to JPEG problem
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: What Equipment for the Grand Canyon?
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Model Release: Pay or Not to Pay


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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Combo Workshop: Photograph Oregon with Charlie Borland
Join BetterPhoto's Charlie Borland for an exciting week of photography at Oregon's Steens Mountain. Open to both digital and film photographers, this combination on-location and online workshop - September 26th to October 2nd, 2004 - is a great opportunity to explore and photograph the fantastic Southeastern Oregon scenery with a great photographer/instructor! With glacial cut valleys, aspen filled gorges, wildflower laden meadows, and great desert views, Steens Mountain offers the landscape photographer a vast array of photo subjects. Learn all about it at: http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/_cws/Charlie-Borland-Steens-Oregon.asp

Charlie also teaches an immensely popular "Stock Photography" course here at BetterPhoto. For details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/CBL01.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 173rd issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Big news: The results of the latest BetterPhoto contest have been posted! As you probably know, July was the launch of our revamped contest - expanded to 10 categories, including a monthly theme. And we are absolutely thrilled with the results! For more on the contest, check the update item below.

In other news, BetterPhoto instructor Peter Burian has announced the publication of his excellent new book, "Mastering Digital Photography and Imaging" - a practical, accessible guide that demystifies the world of digital photography and imaging. Be sure to see all the details below.

More news about books by BetterPhoto instructors: Copies of the new edition of Bryan Peterson's classic "Understanding Exposure" are due to arrive at our office within a week! Pre-ordered books will be sent out shortly afterward. To learn more about the book, or to order an autographed copy, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1246

And, as always, this issue of SnapShot profiles two outstanding BetterPhoto galleries. The Featured Gallery spotlights a spectacular subject - birds of prey - while the Featured Place offers a photo tour of big, bold, and beautiful Alaska. Finally, don't miss the Q&A for information, inspiration, and just plain interesting reading.

That's it for now. Have an enjoyable week of photography!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Master Digital Photography ... with Peter Burian!
Peter K. Burian, BetterPhoto instructor and co-author of the best-selling National Geographic Photography Field Guide, has taken the digital plunge. The result is his excellent new book, "Mastering Digital Photography and Imaging." It's a must-read, whether you're a photography enthusiast making the leap to digital, a gadget lover looking for the latest technology, a novice photographer, or anybody who regularly works with images. For more information or to order an autographed copy, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1248

In addition, Peter is the guest instructor for Jim Miotke's 8-week Digital Photography class. Get all the course details at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/PBN01.asp


*****
Enjoy a Season of Learning and Shooting
Our next session of online photo courses promises to fill the fall season with creativity, inspiration, and information. BetterPhoto's schedule covers such an exciting array of subjects: field techniques, digital photography, exposure, composition, Photoshop, specialty subjects, and business and marketing. Because of so many great courses to choose from, we've made the decision-making process easier ... check out our categories page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


*****
View July's Showcase of Contest Winners
BetterPhoto's revamped contest - still the best on the Web! - kicked off in July ... and what a great response! Congratulations go to John Wright for his Grand Prize winning photo, "Independent Sunset." Kudos also go to David Wilkinson, Aaron Whitney, Nancy Chen, John Sandstedt, Kathleen Leickly, Nigel Dann, Deborah Sandidge, Monika Sapek, and Andrew Nitzberg for their terrific First Place prize winning images. Of course, the second-place finishers and the finalists deserve plenty of praise, too! See the contest shots at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/contest/winners/0407.asp

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FEATURED GALLERY
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Picturing the Majestic Birds of Prey
One of the most popular wildlife subjects among BetterPhoto shooters is also one of the most spectacular: birds of prey. Check out BP's gallery, and you'll see eagles, owls, hawks, and falcons caught in grand poses and in spectacular midflight. For shooting ideas and inspiration, don't miss the "Birds of Prey Pictures" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=532

On a related note, BetterPhoto founder Jim Miotke will lead an incredible wildlife photography adventure in the red rock country of Southern Utah from April 13th to April 16th, 2005. This unique Combo Workshop offers photographers the chance to record wildlife models in an array of natural settings. Included will be a bonus "Birds of Prey" session! For all the exciting details, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/wildlife-photography/JCM-UT.asp

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FEATURED PLACE
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Alaska: Big, Bold, and Beautiful
The headline for this gallery says it all about this awesome North American showplace! Best yet, BetterPhoto's talented members and instructors have captured the color and character of Alaska with so many incredible images. Subjects include mountain landscapes, snowscapes, reflections, intimate scenes, and details. And, of course, there's the wildlife - with a great assortment of bear, grizzly, moose, wolf, seal, whale, and bird shots. For shooting ideas and inspiration, check out BetterPhoto's "Alaska Pictures" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=172

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
What was the brand name of the camera that the great French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson used, and what special thing did he do to it?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Phillip Robider is:
The brand name was Leica. He taped over the silver parts with black tape and kept it covered with a handkerchief.

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Mistakes Happen - entered by BetterPhoto member Kerry Drager

A 1/2 million dollar camera lens was recently ruined by exposure to candy ... what happened?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Still Reluctant to Try Digital? By Shawn R. Olszewski
Some of the less expensive "prosumer" digital cameras have many manual controls (i.e., focus, shutter speed, f-stop) and can use the filters you've already spent your hard-earned money on. While a 3.1 megapixel model would never replace your SLR, it can be an inexpensive way to cut your teeth on digital and, more importantly, improve your film photography. You can shoot all day long, trying every combination of f-stop/shutter speed and so on - without spending a dime or waiting for prints.

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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ADVERTISEMENT
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Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:

  • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
  • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
  • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Shooting Lightning
Can I capture lightning with a digital camera? I'm a weather fanatic, love tornados, lightning, etc. I want a digital camera because of all the features, but I heard the image quality isn't as good. What would be the best digital camera to get for taking lightning pictures? Also, what's the best film camera to take pictures of lightning with?
- Nicolas Payne

ANSWER 1:
I would imagine that any camera - digital or film - is capable of capturing lightning strikes ... as long as it has a "bulb" setting for long exposures at night. You can get some great tips on shooting lighting at this link:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9967
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11001

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11001

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NEW QUESTION 2: How to Take Night City Pictures
I'd like to take pictures of downtown Honolulu, for instance, but my attempts do not give me the effect I wanted. What do I really need to do?
- Carole Hude

ANSWER 1:
In general for night shots: Tripod and slow shutter speed with a large aperture, but keep it underexposed relative to the meter reading by 1 stop or more. You can use the setting "Night shot" if using a digital camera. We'll really need some more detail about what you did, what equipment you have, and what effect you're actually trying to get to really help you out. It would probably also help if you post some example shots with a description of what you think is wrong with them.
Pam
- Pamela L. Keil

ANSWER 2:
If you've got a camera that gives you control over the shutter speed, you will need to slow down the shutter, to a 1" or more. You'll also need a tripod or something to keep the camera steady, and a shutter release cable or some type of remote to fire the shutter ...
hth
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Hi Carole,
Your shot from Waikiki looks like it's exposed OK, but it looks a little fuzzy. I think you may have experienced camera movement during the exposure. When shooting time exposures, your camera has to be rock-steady during the entire time of exposure. Tall buildings will "move" back and forth if there's a breeze outside.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=11000

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=11000

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*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Wedding Photography - Last-Minute Tips?
I am shooting my very first wedding tomorrow. Now before you tell me to stop and run the other way, hehe ... a little bit of background: I have taken several photography classes, as well as for the past six months worked as an assistant with another photographer. I have read tons of books, magazines, Web site articles, etc., about photography in the recent year. I have been educating myself as much as possible.

And I have decided to try it on my own and enter the world of professional wedding photography. Tomorrow is my first of seven weddings that I have already booked for the next few months.

I will be using a Canon Digital Rebel (the experienced pro-photographer I work with uses the same camera) as well as my Pentax ZX-7 for backup. I have "professional grade" compact flash cards and professional film. I have one really good bounce flash, tons of extra batteries, a backup older SLR and a small point and shoot Nikon digital camera JUST IN CASE.

I'm very excited and nervous! And I just wanted to see if anyone has any last-minute tips for me for tomorrow.
- Kamila Harris

See Kamila's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
I have no experience with this whatsoever, but I bet you'll do great! I just wanted to say can you PLEASE post some pictures and alert me by email! I'd love to see this as I got excited for you just reading the message!

You can email me through my gallery at:

http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=77500

Good luck! And remember: Try to catch lots of candid shots when people aren't looking as well as staged photos. Those will be treasures!
- Karma Wilson

See Karma's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
As an amateur photographer, and also a married person of 2 years, I just have a couple suggestions for pictures not to forget! I had a photographer who was semi-retired but with many years experience, and although the pictures turned out great, I was disappointed (and probably over expectant because of my photography skills) with some of the photos (or the ones that weren't there).

DONT FORGET to get a staged picture of the bride/groom kissing. It's always a nice one to have in case the actual first kiss doesn't turn out perfect. Also, for outdoor weddings, be aware of where the sun is. Our photographer didn't want his pictures with the sun in the background - so half of my family was squinting in the pictures, as they were looking directly into the path of the sun!

Good luck! You sound like you have lots of education in the area. Hope they turn out great!
- Shauna

ANSWER 3:
One more tip: Remember to get pictures of the pretty wedding favors - in macro. These can be used in a wedding collage later on! I saw somebody on this site do that and thought it was a really neat touch.
- Karma Wilson

See Karma's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10999

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10999

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Upping the EV and Noise
Hi,
I know that increasing the ISO will increase the noise.

What about increasing the EV?
(I currently shoot w/Nikon CoolPix 8700)

If increasing the EV increases 'noise' also, is there a lesser of the two evils?
Thanks for any light on this...
- Carolina K. Smith

Visit CarolinaSmith.com - Carolina K.'s Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
If by "increasing the EV" you mean using the exposure compensation control, no, these are not equivalent.

If your exposure at ISO 100 is f/4 and 1/15, then increasing the ISO to 400 allows 2 stops higher shutter speed: f/4 and 1/60. The total exposure remains the same, though. The loss of light due to the high shutter speed is offset by the higher sensitivity of the sensor at ISO 400.

If you keep the ISO at 100, and dial in -2 EV of exposure compensation, you'll get f/4 and 1/60, but you'll be 2 stops underexposed.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
Thanks for the explanation. Then why not increase the EV, rather than the ISO - for example, a low-light situation where you were trying to keep shutter speeds as fast as possible to reduce blur?
- Carolina K. Smith

Visit CarolinaSmith.com - Carolina K.'s Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
The problem is that your photo is then underexposed. You won't be able to see dark areas at all. I increase or decrease the EV when I'm trying to make lighting changes. For example, if I'm photographing a large white expanse, like a snowscape, I'll dial in +.7 so that the snow actually looks white. If I'm taking a shot of a sunset, on the other hand, I'll underexpose (-1.0) to capture the reds.

However, if you use this trick under regular lighting conditions, your pictures will come out underexposed or overexposed. This means that darker areas will be invisible or lighter areas will be completely blown out. A little noise is probably preferable to this. If you wanted a picture with normal lighting but faster shutter speed, you would increase the ISO rather than using exposure compensation.
Pam
- Pamela L. Keil

ANSWER 4:
In layman's terms, EV is the amount of light there is. Midday has higher EV than dusk, like 8 is to 2. Camera meters see all white things in midday as very bright, thinking very high EV (like 10) and see all black things in midday as very dark EV (like 6). Light levels (EV Value) doesn't change, regardless if the meter thinks it does. EV compensation fixes the meter being fooled, but can't do anything about how much light there is.
You change ISO for low light, because if it's dark, then it's dark.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10979

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10979

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Buying A Digital Camera: Shutter Delay?
I am a longtime film camera user who has just plunged into the ever popular digital camera realm. I purchased a Fujifilm Finepix s3000 and am a little miffed about its performance. After I depress the shutter, there is a slight delay in capturing the image - frustrating, especially when taking action shots and realizing there is nothing to show for in the frame. Is this normal? Are there "faster" cameras out there? I don't want to invest too much into something I am unsure of ... thanks in advance.
- simone

ANSWER 1:
Unfortunately, this is common with digital cameras. The Sony DSC-S75 has, in my experience, a shutter delay of more than 1 second sometimes! But that's an old camera. Most aren't that bad at all. Digital cameras make a lot of calculations once you hit the shutter - namely, white balance, which has to be calculated appropriately before the shutter will open. However, the Canon MkII has a nearly instantaneous shutter, but that's a high-end camera. The delay will indubitably get better as cameras develop, so don't let this push you away from digital. It has its benefits. I'm sure there are consumer and prosumer cameras out there now that have an acceptable delay (or lack thereof.)
- Steven Chaitoff

ANSWER 2:
I do a lot of wildlife photography, and the digital delay was at first extremely frustrating. However, I found that many other features (like the ability to instantly view and erase a picture if I missed the moment) made digital extremely worthwhile. I also found that the digital delay actually improved my photographic skills, because I had to anticipate, by just a fraction of a second, what the animal was going to do. The high-end DSLRs seem to have reduced the digital delay quite a bit, but it's still there.

One thing that's helped me is that my camera has a multiframe mode where it takes up to six shots in a row while I hold the shutter button down. This allows me to get sequences of quickly-changing behavior without worrying about the digital delay. You may want to see if your camera has a similar option.

I also recommend going out (since digital pictures are free) and taking shots of something you don't care too much about or something you can see/repeat often to get used to the digital delay. If you're using your camera for sports shots, get a couple of kids together and practice action shots with them. It will help you anticipate the action and get used to the timing of your digital camera.
Hope this helps ... Pam
- Pamela L. Keil

ANSWER 3:
Thank you for your words of experience. I feel better knowing it is a "digital quirk" and not an error on my part. So I will go onward and practice, and anticipate shots with this knowledge in mind.
- simone

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10973

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10973

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Beginner ... Help Please!
I have never purchased a camera in my life, although I am currently looking into it. I would like a 35mm fully manual camera. If you could give me some idea of what direction to start off in when looking for one of those - or just give me a few suggestions - I would really appreciate it.
- Brittany Erin Hyatt

ANSWER 1:
Hi Brittany,
For fully-manual SLRs ... think "Used". You can save money by purchasing a previously owned or re-furbished manual SLR body, and use the savings to get better lenses and accessories.
As a longtime Nikon user, I can fully recommend a Nikon FM10, which can be found new or used, or its predecessor, the FM2, first manufactured in the early eighties, but still available used, and a real workhorse! (I still use the one I bought new in 1984, and it works flawlessly.)
Be cautious when buying ANY used camera equipment, though. As long as the dealer/seller is reputable, you're usually OK. But make sure there is a return policy.
Happy hunting!
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10966

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10966

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Shooting Skaters in a Dark Rink
I'm giving my daughter a skating party this weekend, and I already know the rink will be very dark. I don't have a flash yet (other than what's attached to my Canon Digital Rebel already). I would like to use this opportunity to practice and learn, but am worried about the lack of lighting, and trying to get action photos with fast and slow shutter speeds...

Any advice?

Many thanks! Michael!
- Michael

ANSWER 1:
Hi Michael. This is my 2c ... your mileage may vary :-)

-- Forget the built-in flash; it just won't have the reach (try it if you want).
-- Shoot RAW, so you can easily fix the horrible colour casts from those mercury lights.
-- Use the fastest lens you own, if it's only a short lens, get closer.
-- Maximum ISO on the camera, the DRebel has a pretty quiet sensor.
-- You may find that manual focus works better that auto.
-- Pan with the skaters.
-- Try shooting with -1 stop on the exposure compensation (that will give you a faster shutter speed) and then open up by 1 stop in the RAW converter (that little +/- symbol in the top left of the RAW converter window). This is the digital equivalent of "push processing." Try it with 2 stops (getting a bit noisy).
-- Take your tripod, use the built-in flash in "slow sync" mode for some interesting effects (does the DRebel do 2nd curtain sync??). Slow sync (I think it's call "night" on the DRebel) will also give you reasonable group shots and avoid the black background you will get just using the flash.

Enjoy the party, and take LOTS of pictures (they are free).

Cheers
DC
- Dave Cross

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10957

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10957

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: How to Fix Flash Caught in Eyeglasses
Could someone help me out here? I'm using Photoshop Elements 2.0. How would I go about reducing the flash in the woman's glasses?
- Diane L. Dupuis-Kallos

See Diane's Premium BetterPholio™

See Sample Photo - fix flash caught in glasses:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=492954

ANSWER 1:
Hi,
To reduce or eliminate the flash in eyeglasses or glass, try shooting at an angle from the glass, and not straight on, whenever possible. As for using Photoshop Elements, I don't use this program, but I do use Photoshop 6 and 7. To fix this type of problem in Photoshop, I would use the clone tool and clone the flash highlights into the flesh color. You may have to work carefully around the eyes. Perhaps Elements has the clone tool. Good luck.
- Annie

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10956

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10956

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*****


NEW QUESTION 9: TIFF to JPEG problem
The situation; I have about 160 wedding pics that I took in JPEG, then converted to TIFF to retouch in p/s. The problem: Now the files are too large to ftp to my lab(estimated time 4 days 7 hours.) The question: Would I lose a "noticeable" amount of quality if I converted the retouched TIFF files back into JPEG in order to ftp them? Like I said before, they are wedding pics, and I have been paid to take them, so I want to give them good proofs. Thanks so much for any advice.
James
- James E. McKinney

ANSWER 1:
One of the things about JPEG is you lose quality on each edit/save. I think you would be better off to write them to CD and mail them, so you can keep them as TIFF. You have already lost quality on the first JPEG save, so I would not want to lose any more. Just my opinion.
Vince
www.PhotoAgo.com
- Vince Broesch

ANSWER 2:
After you make your edits on the TIFF file, you can then save it back as a high-quality JPEG, and you shouldn't have any trouble with image quality. I have sent several JPEGs to an online photo printing lab and have gotten back incredibly beautiful, professional prints up to 11x14" (I use Holland Photo).
- Mikki Cowles

See Mikki's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Hi James. I concur with Mikki, for proofs, send them as high-quality (low compression) JPEGs. Once your customers have decided which shots they want BIG, you can send the relevant TIFF files (probably on a CD).
Cheers
DC

- Dave Cross

ANSWER 4:
Thanks, guys, for all your help. One more question, Dave: Would these proofs be acceptable to sell to the customer for the wedding album?
Thanks again.
- James E. McKinney

ANSWER 5:
Hi again James. IMHO, low compression (high quality) JPEGs are fine up to about 10x8-ish, maybe (if they are really good) 11x14 - anything bigger really needs the added detail of the TIFF. Particularly in this instance, you really don't want another JPEG compression in the loop.
In the future, I should shoot RAW and convert to 16bit TIFF to do your edits.
Cheers
DC
- Dave Cross

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10938

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10938

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CONTINUING QUESTION 1: What Equipment for the Grand Canyon?
I'm going to the Grand Canyon for the first time. I am confused as to what equipment to carry. I have an Olympus OM2000. The lenses I have are 35-70mm f3.5-4.8, 70-205mm f3.5, 100-300mm 4.5-5.6, and a 135mm f2.8. The telephoto zooms are very heavy, and I don't want to carry both of them because of back pain. I also have to buy a wide-angle lens. Should I go for a 24mm f2.8 or 19-35mm f3.5-4.5? Both are within my budget.
- Rajesh Gaurav

ANSWER 1:
When I went to the Grand Canyon, I carried these 3 lenses: 28mm, 50mm and 135mm FD for my Canon AT-1. I used the 28mm and 50mm most. I only used the 135mm on one photo. So my suggestion to you, either the 24mm or the 19-35mm, the 35-70mm and optional, either the 70-205mm or 100-300mm, whichever is lighter or the better optic. Hope this helps.
- Andy Szeto

ANSWER 2:
Hi, Rajesh G: I have been to the GC twice, once in the fall and once in the winter, and spent weeks poring over books (photographer's guide to the Grand Canyon and Northern Az by Lange and Photographing the Southwest by Martres, especially). I took my 24mm, 80-200, 105 micro, 24-120, a lot of film, my flash, my Nikon F100, my filters for BW and packed them in a mini trekker. My husband took his Nikon N80 with a Tamron 28-300. I spent so much time switching lenses that I felt like throwing the backpack into the canyon. My husband didn't even carry a pack or a bag and was able to go places I could not. Our lab could find no difference in quality between his images and mine with enlargements of 8x10.

The 24-120 was the lens I used most. If I had had the 28-300, I would have used that, but I seldom used the 80-200. Having so much equipment was unnecessary, exhausting and a distraction - for me, at least. If I were going again, I would buy the widest angle zoom I could afford and take only 2 lenses.

You are very lucky to be seeing the Grand Canyon. Have a wonderful trip. I hope this info is of some use.
- Randall

ANSWER 3:
I spent some time there this spring - and, to make a long story short, my Fuji S2 Pro, my 12-24 Nikon, and my Tamron 28-300 would have been all I needed. When you're working on or near canyon edges, you can't always move up or back for composition. A zoom has an edge over a prime in this type of situation.
- Marvin Woodward

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CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Model Release: Pay or Not to Pay
Does a photographer have to pay a person for getting a model release signed? If so what do you pay them? Do you need a model release for each person in a picture if it's a group or event shot?
- Alonzo J. Adams

ANSWER 1:
Most of the time you shouldn't have to pay. But I think it's a real courtesy to offer copies of prints in exchange for the release ...
hth
- Damian Gadal

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ANSWER 2:
I've been told that if you plan to sell the picture, you have to get a release from every person - and that if you don't get it, you either have to blur out that face or not use the picture.
- Sue Dehn

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ANSWER 3:
I get a model release from each and every single person - and their parents, if a minor. I will not even take their picture if they don't sign. Sometimes I pay the model, sometimes we exchange time for prints (if you mean arranged shots). If you are photographing a stranger on the street, technically if the area is in the public domain, you do not need a release. But I don't care ... I get one anyway. Always, always, always get one. You never know what use you may have for the pictures and you may lose out if you didn't get the release!
- Leah Marshall

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ANSWER 4:
I tell my models up front that I pay in prints, and most are thrilled with that. When it is someone you've requested to model for you, be clear ahead of time how many prints and what sizes you are willing to give. The only model I've ever paid is my favorite, and she gets 10 percent of anything I sell that has her in it - along with prints of anything I create with her in it.
- Shirley Cross

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ANSWER 5:
"Does a photographer have to pay a person for getting a model release signed?"
A signed release (at least in the USA), without compensation, is effectively an incomplete contract. The release is not enforceable unless there was some form of compensation.

"If so, what do you pay them? "
That is to be agreed upon by the two parties in the contract. The law states that there must be some form of compensation ... it doesn't state what that compensation must be. It could be as little as $1.00 or a copy of the picture, or any other type of barter ... as long as both parties are agreeable.

"Do you need a model release for each person in a picture if it's a group or event shot?"
It really depends on how the picture will be used. If it is for "editorial" purposes only, the general rule is no. But if for other purposes, such as advertising, yes. HOWEVER, the main rule is to always obtain a release whenever possible.
- Randy Kinney

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