BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THIS ISSUE - Tuesday, July 13, 2004
~~~~~~~~~~~

* SPOTLIGHT: There's Still Time to Sign Up for Class!
* BETTERPHOTO: BetterPhoto's New Contest Is Better Than Ever!
* BETTERPHOTO: Check Out Tony Sweet's DVD - At a Lower Price!
* BETTERPHOTO: Showcase Your Work With a Deluxe BetterPholio™
* FEATURED GALLERY: Striking Silhouettes: When Less Is More
* FEATURED PLACE: Colorado's Rocky Mountain High
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Unbearable / A Special Chaplin Effect
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Keeping Track on a Travel Shoot, Part II Ö By Karen Rickers
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Team Photos Outdoors
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Lesson #1: A Wildlife Guide
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Saving Photos from a Digital Camera
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: How to Eliminate Shadows
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Sports and Blurred Backgrounds
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Large Format Cameras
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: What's the Best Polarizing Filter?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: How to Take Good Portrait Pictures?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: What AF SLR Camera Should I Buy?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: More Printing Questions
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Info on Macro Lenses
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Shooting a Silhouette on Purpose
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: How to Fix Lighting Flares in Digital Photograph
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 14: How to Shoot a Wedding?
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Compact Flash Memory Cards
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: How to Shoot Photos with Blurry Backgrounds


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There's Still Time to Sign Up for Class!
Kicking yourself for waiting too long? Don't fret, because you can still join one of BetterPhoto's online photography courses. Although the first lessons have already been sent out, the assignments from them are not due until July 18. If you sign up today, we can send you the first lesson pronto, and you will have plenty of time to do the first assignment. Choose from the available photo courses at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to the 168th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Our latest session of online photo courses is off to a fantastic start! But I want to encourage any stragglers, since it is definitely not too late to enroll. So if you haven't signed up yet, check out an exciting list of available courses at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp

With BetterPhoto's new contest now offering 10 categories, there are bound to be a few questions - and, in the item below, we answer them! Next, see the Featured Gallery and its striking interplays of light and shadow ... namely, silhouettes. Then, in the Featured Place, take a photographic tour of Colorado's outstanding scenery. Finally, don't miss This Week's Tip by Karen Rickers, as well as another great collection of questions and answers.

That's it for now. Enjoy this SnapShot ... and happy shooting!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
BetterPhoto's New Contest Is Better Than Ever!
OK, we heard your requests for more flexibility in the contest ... and we listened! As July rolls right along, things are proceeding very nicely with the Internet's best, most fun and friendliest photo contest. Still, we'd like to clarify a couple of points:

  • Theme of the Month: This applies only to the "Monthly Theme" category - not to the other nine categories. And feel free to use your creativity when it comes to finding subjects that match the particular theme. For example, while flags and fireworks obviously fits the theme of "Independence," other unique or eye-catching interpretations are equally valid.

  • Special Effects is the category for your Polaroid transfers, SX-70 images, handcolored prints, cross-processing shots, lens-zooming pictures, and photos with similar manipulations. However, digital-art images (those created or drastically altered with software like Photoshop) go into the Digital Darkroom category. For more contest guidelines, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/contest/categories.asp


    *****
    Check Out Tony Sweet's DVD - At a Lower Price!
    BetterPhoto instructor Tony Sweet's inspiring DVD, "Visual Rhythm: The Art and Business of Nature Photography," just got better: It's now priced at $29.95. This DVD is packed with dozens of Tony's finest images, including a wonderful montage set to music. Also featured: in-the-field instruction, tips on using different filters and lenses, and advice on how to turn your hobby of nature photography into a successful career. For more details, and to purchase "Visual Rhythm," visit BetterPhoto's online store at: http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1174

    Or consider learning directly from Tony with his two online courses here at BetterPhoto:

    "Fine Art Flower Photography" at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/TNS02.asp

    "Image Design: Revealing Your Personal Vision" at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/TNS01.asp


    *****
    Showcase Your Work With a Deluxe BetterPholio™
    With a Deluxe BetterPholio™ by BetterPhoto.com, you choose the look and feel of your own site from a selection of unique, high-quality designs. Each design includes a portfolio gallery of up to 1000 of your favorite images. BetterPhoto takes care of the technical hassles for you, but we don't stop there. In addition, all Web hosting fees are included. In fact, at BetterPhoto, you get the complete package - Web site design, Web hosting, and domain name registration - for one bargain price. Learn all the details at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/deluxeWebsites.asp

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    FEATURED GALLERY
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    Striking Silhouettes: When Less Is More
    These stark interplays of brights and darks produce a quick and powerful impact, since they emphasize form over detail. Best yet, with a little insight and a little practice, silhouettes can be as exhilarating to shoot as they are rewarding to view. The key is to find a shadowed subject thatís sharply outlined, thatís easily identifiable, and thatís set against a sunlit background. Caution: Contrasts in lighting can fool your camera meter. Here's one way to ensure your silhouette turns black and loses detail: Temporarily fill your viewfinder with a middle-blue or sunset sky (or with a mid-tone in another illuminated area in the scene), take a meter reading, re-compose your scene, and fire away at those settings. For shooting ideas and inspiration, check out BetterPhoto's "Silhouette Pictures" gallery at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=1184

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    FEATURED PLACE
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    Colorado's Rocky Mountain High
    The Western U.S. state of Colorado is such a big and beautiful place with equally big and beautiful picture possibilities. Of course, it's Colorado's Rocky Mountain scenery that often captures the attention - from grand landscapes to intimate views. Specifically, BetterPhoto shooters have zeroed in on fall color, mirrored lake reflections, rugged peaks, winter scenes, spring wildflowers, wildlife, and so on. But Colorado's photographic appeal doesn't stop there. Also expect interesting architecture (from boathouses to the capitol dome to eye-catching details) and the bright lights of Denver (captured so strikingly at night). For shooting ideas and inspiration, see BetterPhoto's "Colorado Pictures" gallery at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=1015

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Last week, we asked:
    Who played the photographer in the film The Unbearable Lightness of Being?

    The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Mary Robison is:
    It was Juliette Binoche, who played Tereza, a waitress who became a photographer, in "The Unbearable, etc." Forget Daniel Day-Lewis, who played her lover! (Note: In addition, Anne Lonnberg played a Swiss photographer in the film, and Lena Olin as Sabina put a camera to use, too!)

    See Mary's Premium BetterPholio™:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=45394

    To see all answers to this question, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

    And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - A Special Chaplin Effect - entered by BetterPhoto member Blanca Acosta

    There's a scene in Charlie Chaplin's film "The Kid" in which his famous hat "jumps back" to his head, after he throws it. How did he create that effect?

    Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Keeping Track on a Travel Shoot, Part II Ö By Karen Rickers
    I read Brenda Tharp's article (last weekís SnapShot), and loved the tip on dating and time coding film to keep it in order after shooting. In response to this, instead of keeping notes on what you're shooting, I use a derivative of "slating," a term I think comes from movies when they wrote the film and "take" number on a slate for the beginning of each shot.

    If I'm shooting a church in Greece, let's say, there's usually a sign out front giving the name and possibly the location of the church. So I shoot a frame of that. Then when I'm looking at 30 rolls of film a couple of weeks later, it's easy to identify the location and subject. It costs you a frame, but it's more convenient than writing it down in a notebook. This would also work with head shots ... just have the person hold up a card with their name on it, take a shot, then shoot the actual pics. I don't know if this is obvious to everyone else or not, but it helps me, especially since I hate taking out a notebook when I'm shooting!

    Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

    Add Your Own Tip:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
    My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:

    • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
    • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
    • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
    You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

    BetterPhoto.com
    P.O. Box 2781
    Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

    To order online, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    NEW QUESTION 1: Team Photos Outdoors
    Can anyone help with the team portrait photo-shoot outdoors? My question is: Should I frame the subjects using the telephoto end of the lens, or the wide-angle, or somewhere in between? I'm using a 18-55 Canon USM lens. I have been doing it at approx 35mm at present, but have heard its better to go 55 or even use a different lens and go to 80mm. What are your thoughts? Thank you.
    - Nick Milton

    ANSWER 1:
    Nick, for larger group portraits, stay toward the 50mm focal length. If you go too short a focal length, you can get an unnatural-looking perspective of subjects near the edges of the frame, especially in the corners. Longer than 50mm - from about 75mm to about 135mm - is typically used for tight portraiture of one or two people (occasionally three, but that's rare) - tight meaning 1/3rd or less of the person from mid-chest upward.
    - John A. Lind

    See John's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    The EF-S 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 USM can only be used on the Digital Rebel, which has a smaller image sensor than the 35mm film frame. I believe John L.'s recommendation is appropriate for 35mm film, but for use with the Digital Rebel you want to divide the recommended focal lengths by the 1.6 crop factor, and use the EF 18-55 at about 30mm to 40mm (which would give a view equivalent to 48mm to 64mm in a 35mm film camera).
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10436

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10436

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 2: Lesson #1: A Wildlife Guide
    The following five places are locations that Iíve been to and highly recommend. Each has its own features and advantages. Yesterday I had surgery to my head and am instructed to keep a low profile for the next little while, so Iím having to look to previous places for a bit.

    Yellowstone Bear World, Rexford, Idaho.
    www.yellowstonebearworld.com/
    We were taking a tour of the Northwest last year and had just gone through Yellowstone National Park seeing only one immature grizzly bear in the process. I recall in the 1930s having visited the park with my folks and seeing many, many bears so this was quite a let-down. We had checked out Bear World and planned a stop there. The bear portion of the park was disappointing since many of the bears were off dozing probably or hiding so we didnít see too many. We then took a tour of the bear portion where we were up on the back of a pickup truck high enough so that the bears couldnít join us. We arranged to take along several flats of goodies for the bears and the guide called them out. We were literally throwing out goodies with one hand and taking pictures with the other. It was well worth the tour. There were many other good sightings of animals there as well. My granddaughters enjoyed seeing a very young fawn.

    Cat Tails Rescue Facility, north of Spokane, Washington.
    http://www.wtv-zone.com/BigCats/AZoo/CatTails.html
    Learning from the guide at Bear World of the existence of this big cat rescue facility, we arranged to stop and take it in. They had periodic tours where the guides told stories of the cats and how they came to be there. Some were amazing about the folks who thought that they could raise a big cat from a cute cub and then they get big and are too much to care for. One story was about a dog in one of the cages. It seemed that a lion had a dog for a friend so when the lion came to the facility, the companion dog came also.

    Everglades Holiday Park, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
    www.evergladesholidaypark.com/
    This is a park that I frequently visit when in Florida as it has interesting birds and isnít that far from civilization. They have airboat tours, which are both interesting and exciting. It is the only place where Iíve had a taste of alligator tail. The guides know where the gators are. They also have some of the most beautiful birds, the Purple Gallinules.

    Lion Country Safari, west of West Palm Beach, Florida
    www.lioncountrysafari.com/
    This is a very popular park but worth a trip through it. In addition to the lions (where you have to keep your windows up), you will drive through animal places that are amazing. You will see ostriches, zebras, wildebeast, rhinos, giraffes, monkeys, gorillas, and so much more. We also caught sight of a piliated woodpecker and pretty wood ducks (both there of their own will).

    Puffins at Machias Seal Island
    www.machiassealisland.com/
    This is our most recent adventure and happened just last month. We went out on a boat from Jonesport, Maine, and transferred to a smaller boat for landing. As the Arctic terns were nesting and little ones hatching, we were cautioned to watch where we stepped or you could step on an egg or hatchling. While walking, we were advised to hold sticks above our heads since the Arctic terns would dive bomb you away from their nests and the stick above would discourage them. We were shown to one of several blinds from which we were able to photograph Atlantic puffins and Razorbill Auks at very close range.
    Al Lord
    - Alan Lord

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10434

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10434

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 3: Saving Photos from a Digital Camera
    I just purchased my first digital camera (Canon Rebel Digital). My question is what is the best way to save my photos to a CD and still keep the quality that they have on my camera?
    - Tracy

    ANSWER 1:
    The most data is in the RAW, but a TIFF would be fine for most people. Be careful with those neat, small JPG files, because the price of that small file is data lost forever.

    Vince www.PhotoAgo.com
    - Vince Broesch

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10424

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10424

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 4: How to Eliminate Shadows
    How do you eliminate shadows around or on the side of your subject?
    - Brandi N.

    ANSWER 1:
    Is your subject causing the shadows or are shadows covering up the subject? Use a flash to "fill" in the shadows so you have a less contrasty picture.
    - Steven Chaitoff

    ANSWER 2:
    Bounce the flash off the ceiling.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    Brandi, I presume this is with flash? If so ...
    It's the lighting direction of the flash in relation to the lens. If the flash is directly above the lens, the shadows will be down and behind the subject. Even then, if the subject is too close to something behind them, you may still see the head shadow behind the neck ... and if there's an arm outstretched, you may see a shadow of it under the arm.

    Watch how close you put a subject to a background ... and if at all possible get the flash directly above the lens. This is one of several reasons wedding photographers use flash brackets ... to keep flash well above lens regardless of camera orientation.

    Gregory's suggestion will work if you have a white (or nearly white) ceiling to bounce off of. Aim the flash head at the midpoint between the flash and the subject. For much of my indoor professional shooting, I'm not blessed with a low enough ceiling very often, and many times it's not white. A couple cautions in using bounce: If the surface you're bouncing light off of is something other than white - or very close to it - the bounced light will pick up that color and your photo will have a color cast to it. One of the trade-offs with bounce is that if you don't have a "secondary" low-powered flash tube under the main one that you can turn on, you won't get any catchlights in the eyes from the flash. This is one of the tell-tales that indicates to me immediately that indirect bounced flash was very likely used. If your flash has a secondary, turn it on when using bounce ... and if you can set the power level of it, I recommend about 10% of the main flash power (by the time the main head bounces the light, it's cut to about half making the direct secondary about 1/5th to 1/4th of the bounced light).

    In a studio (or on-location) with studio lights neither on the camera or aimed from the camera direction, the subject is either kept far enough from the background to keep from casting a shadow on it, or an additional background light is used to put light on the background and that eliminates it.
    - John A. Lind

    See John's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10420

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10420

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 5: Sports and Blurred Backgrounds
    Hi. I have a Canon A40, with an AIAF mode. I'm not sure, but has this anything to do with blurred backgrounds? I want to take following shots: Football match - closer shots, but I only have x3 optical. Kids with blurred backgrounds - would love to do this, since pictures look really nice like this. Panning water - to get a picture of water running over rocks/pebbles at my local river.
    - David Boyd

    ANSWER 1:
    Closer shots at a football match: If the long end of your zoom lens doesn't get you close enough, you need to get closer yourself. There might be a 1.4x or 2x tele-extender to fit the A40, but it will give you a much smaller effective aperture requiring either longer shutter speeds (too long to freeze action or camera-shake) or setting a higher/noisier ISO. You can use the digital zoom feature as a last resort, realizing that you lose pixels/resolution when digitally zooming.

    Blurred background: Shoot in M (manual), and set the largest aperture (smallest f-number) available on your camera. Getting closer to your subject will also help. You will be limited by the camera's very short focal length lens, which has a very deep depth of field even at widest aperture. As an alternative, you can blur the background by panning with action - set a slower shutter speed and follow a runner with the camera while pressing the shutter. This takes some practice.

    "Panning water" - You actually don't want to pan the scene. You want to mount the camera on a tripod and set a slow shutter speed in M mode. Depending on the water's speed and your distance from it the optimal effect may be at a shutter speed from 1/15 to several seconds.
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 2:
    Hi Jon: Thanks for your response, the f numbers on my camera are 2.8 and 8.0 only, so I will try it on 2.8. Ideally I would definitely like a bigger zoom. Thanks for your reply.
    - David Boyd

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10415

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10415

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 6: Large Format Cameras
    I am considering getting a large format camera. I have no idea what to look for. Any advice would be most welcome. Best wishes, Dave
    - David Wilkinson

    See David's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    What are you going to use the camera for (it makes a difference)? What size are you looking at? Do you want a "field camera" or a "view camera"? New or used?
    - Terry L. Long

    ANSWER 2:
    Hi. OK, I want to use it for landscapes - both rural and urban. I don't really understand the difference between view and field. Used, I think - trying to keep the cost down. Regards, Dave
    - David Wilkinson

    See David's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    David, LF cameras come in a myriad of sizes, but the most popular sizes are 4x5 and 8x10.

    A "view" camera is more bulky, heavier, and harder to get around with than a "field" camera. The "view" camera usually has more movements than a "field" camera and is easier to operate those movements. Also, the "view" camera is commonly called a "monorail" camera because of its construction configuration. Because of the movements, the "view" camera is better suited for photographing buildings and other structures where limited space is available.

    "Field" cameras are smaller and more compact than "view" cameras. They can be folded up to a small size and easily placed in a properly padded backpack for transport. Because of their compact size, most backpackers who shoot LF photography use the "field" camera. However, because of their size they have limited movements (compared to "view" cameras). If you think about it, though, most landscapes don't require a large set of movements, so the "field" camera works just fine.

    Most "field" cameras are made out of wood, brass, and leather parts. They're really a work of art when looked at. Some "field" camera manufacturers have made their cameras out of polycarbonates that alleviate the problem of rigidity that some wood cameras have (especially when they get older). The polycarbonate cameras are just as light as the wood cameras but the less-expensive ones have even fewer movements.

    A good used wooden "field" camera would sell for somewhere around $400.00 on up. A good used "view" camera would sell for somewhere around $250.00 on up. Those prices are without lens boards, lenses, and probably film holders. You could use the light meter in your 35mm camera but that means extra bulk to carry around. Therefore, to cut the weight down a bit, you'd need to get a handheld light meter. A good handheld meter, with spot capabilities, will cost somewhere around $250.00 (used but in excellent condition). Good luck.
    - Terry L. Long

    ANSWER 4:
    Maybe rent some equipment first, if possible, to see if this is something you want to invest in.
    - Jerry Frazier

    See Jerry's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10405

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10405

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 7: What's the Best Polarizing Filter?
    Should I stick with the basic polarizer filter? I will be taking photos of the tropics.
    - lynda

    ANSWER 1:
    Lynda: Which camera are you using? For an SLR camera, you need to buy what is called a Circular Polarizer (as opposed to the Linear, but they both look the same to the naked eye.) You cannot go wrong with these brands: B+W or a more affordable brand, Hoya Multi-coated. Cheers!
    - Peter K. Burian

    See Peter Burian's Premium BetterPholio™

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Peter Burian:
    Digital Photography

    ANSWER 2:
    Thanks, Peter. My camera is a Nikon N55.
    - lynda

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10403

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10403

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 8: How to Take Good Portrait Pictures?
    I've had little experience taking portrait pictures. I have a Canon Rebel 2000 with a couple different lens, a flash. I was just recently asked to help take some senior pictures indoors and outdoors. What kind of setup would I need to take good pictures? They asked for some in black and white and some in color. What film would you recommend? What settings are generally considered good when taking good portraits? I welcome any comments and suggestions. Would it be good to use any kind of filters? Thanks for your help!
    - Hillary L. Perry

    ANSWER 1:
    Hillary: It's all about light and how you use it. For portraiture, it's also posing people (and paint them with light) to create a flattering likeness, and controlling background to enhance the pose, and keep it from being distracting.

    The subject of portraiture is enough to fill an entire textbook (and then some). It sounds as if you're using direct on-camera flash (in the hot shoe). If you look at fine portraits of individuals, you'll see that the light is NOT coming from the camera location. It's coming from elsewhere. This is what models their features. You'll also notice that it's very soft with gradual transition from highlight into shadow ... which means the lighting is "soft" (diffused). If you look at the eyes, you'll see "catchlights" in them ... light reflecting off of the moisture on the surface of the eye; it brings the eyes to life ... especially for people with dark eyes. I can tell a lot about the lighting direction by looking at shadows, and the kinds of lighting equipment used ("modifiers," such as umbrellas or softboxes) by looking at the catchlights (one or two small pinpoints in each eye, their location and their shape).

    IMHO, filters won't do much for you with color work, or solve your basic lighting issues. My use of them is exceptionally rare for standard portraiture ... only if I'm doing something very unique and quite unusual. Don't worry about them until you've got basic lighting under control.

    One of the basic things you can do with a single flash indoors (under a white ceiling) is to use bounce lighting and a reflector to soften the light and get it coming from different directions than the camera ... without losing catchlights in the eyes which is one of the tell-tales of pure white ceiling bounce.

    Outdoors, I try to put the individual in open shade against a background that isn't distracting . . . hedge, thick stand of trees, side of a building with interesting texture, etc. I avoid bright direct sunlight like the plague ... it's too harsh. Then I use fill flash which is very little ... just enough to put a little highlight on their face. I set exposure so that the light needed from flash is less than one f-stop ... just barely in need of flash. If you use too much flash outdoors, it's pretty obvious and starts to become harsh.

    If you can ... go to a large library and look for a book in the photography section with a tutorial about portraiture. It may show studio lighting positions, etc., but you can do things with an on-camera flash if you can tilt it upward and rotate it to the each side as well. Then think about how you can get light coming from those directions using some home-made reflectors ... which can be as simple as some white foamcore.

    One of your disadvantages with camera mounted flash is lack of "modeling" lights ... studio strobes and monolights have powerful halogens inside or under the flashtube ring so you can see what the flash will create when it's triggered. This will require some experimentation with a spotlight simulating the flash to get a feel for how to set up reflectors and aim the flash to put light where you want it.

    I'm trying to give you some ideas that can let you do this without spending a fortune on studio equipment. If you're trying to do this professionally, you should think very, very seriously about buying professional studio equipment for the indoor work. Life gets much, much easier in achieving the lighting you want.

    Film: Color portraiture ... Kodak Portra 160NC ... or Fuji NPS. For B/W portraiture, Plus-X Pan (ISO 125) is a fine-grain classic. Tri-X Pan (ISO 400) is another classic with extremely wide latitude and a soft grain that gives the photograph a classic "texture" when enlarged into a large print (8x10 or larger). Both have excellent mid-tones. For B/W shooting, filters - a light or medium yellow - is often used to for more natural- looking skin mid-tones ... and they won't get you into too much trouble with clothing or background colors like other B/W filters can (colors other than the lighter yellow ones).

    John Lind
    - John A. Lind

    See John's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10401

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10401

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 9: What AF SLR Camera Should I Buy?
    I am just starting out in photography and I would like anyone's suggestions on what autofocus SLR cameras I could buy for action photography. Thanks.
    - Ben Martin Pearson

    ANSWER 1:
    If you are interested in action photography, you should get a camera with high burst rate (3 fps and up). Some of the cameras allow an optional power motor drive that attaches to the bottom of the camera to boost the motor drive performance. Of course, you also need a "fast" telephoto lens, preferably with a wide aperture of f/2.8 or f/3.5. Canon cameras that allow you to use the power motor drive are EOS 1v and EOS 3. I am not sure if the others brand of cameras have this kind of power motor drive. Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 2:
    Ben: In addition to looking at various features, you should also consider how a camera "feels" in your hands: where the frequently used controls are, how your fingers naturally fall on them, the "balance" it has, and how naturally your eye can see through the viewfinder without having to squirm around to look through it. As you gain experience you want it to become an extension of your hands and arms so that you can operate it naturally without strain or awkwardness.

    Everyone is different in this regard. What feels natural to me may seem too big, too small, imbalanced, too heavy, or awkward to you (and vice versa). If you haven't handled any yet, get to a store and handle a variety of them mounted with a lens you would typically use with it; then consider the features of those that feel "right" to you in your hands.
    - John A. Lind

    See John's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10390

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10390

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 10: More Printing Questions
    I shoot digital, Nikon D100, and have been asked to take pictures at an outdoor wedding as a favor for a family member. I'm wanting to know what might be the best way to get really nice matte finish prints. I normally shoot in jpg fine (L). I don't have software to process RAW files, should that be acceptable. I'm sure there will be no prints larger than 8 x 10. I'm in Oklahoma, if anyone has any experience in labs here. Thanks for any info you can offer.
    - J. L. White

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi, JW. The RAW converter should be available from the Nikon website. I REALLY recommend that you use RAW - it is so much easier to fix problems (white balance, etc.). Particularly with a one-off event such as a wedding, you can't go back and re-shoot if the bride's dress looks yellow in your pictures. That said, jpeg fine should be OK, but if you need to do any editing, save the file as TIFF so that you don't get any additional compression artifacts. Remember, every time you edit and save as jpeg you throw away a little more data.

    As far as your matt finish is concerned, check out the various inkjet papers, look at matt acrylic varnish (also adds protection to the print), or talk to your local photo lab - they should be able to do silver-halide prints with a matt finish.

    Let us know how you get on. Don't forget the large white card and assistant to hold it, get some reflected light under the ladies hats. Cheers,
    DC

    - Dave Cross

    ANSWER 2:
    DC: Thank you so much for the information. I had not even thought about the reflector ... I will add it to my list of things to take! I will think on the RAW format a bit. I don't have a lot of cards, or large ones at that, wouldn't get too many shots on them in RAW, but will experiment a bit. Thanks again!
    - J. L. White

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10379

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10379

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 11: Info on Macro Lenses
    I am interested in macro photography - flowers, insects, etc. - and am curious as to the most efficient lens to purchase. I have been told to get the 50mm and others have said to go for the 100mm. I would like to have the lens that can do the most with other possible uses but I don't know the advantages/disadvantages of each. I am new to the field and only know what I would like to accomplish. Thanks.
    - john

    ANSWER 1:
    You should get a telephoto lens. I have a 70-210mm lens with macro capability, and it works great when using the macro feature.
    - Matt M. L'Etoile

    ANSWER 2:
    Check the life-size reproduction of any macro lens you are considering. They should say "1:1" (which is true life-size), or at least "1:2" (1/2 life-size). Anything else would be considered a "close-focusing lens" and would have limitations ... not only in your ability to get in real close, but in sharpness and clarity as well. A true macro prime lens produces better corner-to-corner sharpness due to specialized glass designed specifically for close-up work. They are also better for use in low light than a zoom would be. As far as lens focal length, that would depend upon your intended subject matter. Macros in the 105mm range and larger will allow you to shoot farther away from skittish insects, but would have less depth of field than a lens in the 50-60 mm range.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10373

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10373

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 12: Shooting a Silhouette on Purpose
    I have a school project to shoot horse riders in silhouette against a sunset. Now, I have shot silhouettes before, but they were a mistake! I haven't ever tried to produce a true silhouette. I have a Canon EOS 2000, with the standard lens, and I have a Sigma 70 - 300 HSM lens. I am thinking that I just need to use the wide angle. This project is the making of a poster for a movie that the community college made. The dean is wanting a large oak tree, a sunset and silhouettes of horses with riders. I can shoot all of this separately and let them pull it all together, but it would be better to try and get it all in one shot. So, I will take all suggestions out to the country with me and try them all!
    - Rhonda L. Tolar

    ANSWER 1:
    Just arrange the horse and the rider between your camera and the sunset. Expose for the sunset (not directly at the sun but the area of the sky next to the sun). Lock the exposure reading, and take the photo. Take a couple more with plus and minus 1/2 and 1 exposure. Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 2:
    Thank you, Andy, this is helpful. I only get one day to work with this. It is hard to arrange horses, riders, and the sunset all at one time!
    - Rhonda L. Tolar

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10347

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10347

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 13: How to Fix Lighting Flares in Digital Photograph
    I have several digital pictures of a concert. The flares that glare out from the lights is not too bad. But in some instances it is just way to overwhelming on the image. I was wondering how to correct the white hot spots from the lights in the picture - either removing them or toning them down - without the final image looking all hacked up.
    Attached is an example of what I'm trying to accomplish, if it's possible. Notice the white hot spot created by the light in the photograph. I'm pretty sure there is not much that can be done to remove it. But is there a way of toning it down so that it doesn't seem so intense? Thanks in advance.
    - Eric Shawn

    See Sample Photo - Night club scene:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=448179

    ANSWER 1:
    Well, the image you have posted with the question isn't really light flare, but a lot of diffuse light. There is some kind of "fog" in the air which is dispersing the light from the spotlights. This is resulting in your whiting out. Some suggestions would include moving and changing your angle to not include a direct blast from the light source. If you can't do that, you can use a graduated ND filter with the darkened end towards the light source and the undarkened end towards the crowd. This will cut down on the light from the light source and let you expose the crowd properly. The grad filter is used by landscape photographers to even out setting sun and letting the details from the darkening landscape come through.
    - Wing Wong

    See Wing's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    It's not the smoke; it's including the light source in your picture. The other lights are doing the same thing, just that one is bigger and pointing more directly at you. With feathering on the lasso or eliptical outline tool, you can darken it with levels, curves, and contrast. But since it's so hot, the brightest part of the white will get a color shift to yellow.
    That's what happens trying to go too far with darkening highlights with no detail in digital. You can only do a little bit of darkening before it gets too contrasty and bad color.
    To remove it, try the clone tool. Clone some of the darker areas with the smoke, and try to make it look like part of it rises up into that area.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10341

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10341

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 14: How to Shoot a Wedding?
    I am going to shoot a wedding this weekend, and I am really nervous. I have never done this before and now it is too late to back out. Luckily, the wedding will only be 40 people. It will take place in a church with a mini dinner later at a restaurant, so it will not have a normal reception. Basically, it will just be the ceremony. I cannot use a flash during the reception, but I can any other time. Does anyone have any suggestions for what I should do? I do not want to mess this up. Also, I will be using my Nikon SLR 75 camera with two different lenses. Thanks.
    - Jackie

    ANSWER 1:
    This may help:

    http://johnlind.tripod.com/wedding/

    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 2:
    Yes, that Web site will help you tremendously! Also take as many pics before the wedding as things get very rushed afterwards! What are you going to use for film? It also will help to have the couple write down what pics they are interested in having shot, and you can keep a checklist so that nothing is missed. Most of all... relax, breathe, and try to have some fun ... you will do fine!

    Angie :)
    - Angela K. Wittmer

    See Angela's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    Also, you could go to the church a few days before and check out the light. Maybe take a few test shots. If there's not much light, you'll have to use fast film. Find where you need to stand to get them coming "down the aisle". Don't know if you want them to stop in the aisle to take a pic or not, but if you do, let them know ahead of time. Find a marker like, say, 3rd pew (or whatever), find your spot, set your camera, and you'll be ready when the time comes. Good luck!
    - Lori Lyman

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10340

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10340

    back to top

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Compact Flash Memory Cards
    I shoot digital with the Canon 300 and the Canon Eos 1ds. I have several memory cards, all 512mb and up. Two of my cards are the SanDisk Ultra II, and the others are regular compact flash cards. I recently took pictures outdoors with plenty of daylight, and some of my images were blurry. Could it be the difference in my flash cards? I did not use a tripod, but these were portrait shots of children, and I took 188 images and only 100 were not blurred. Is there really that big of a difference between memory cards? Thank you!
    - Bobbi Webre

    ANSWER 1:
    I can't see how your problem would have anything to do with the memory cards. The files are either readable or if corrupted, they aren't. There's no way a bad card would result in a blurred image. 99.999-percent probability it is your technique (camera shake from hand holding, poor focus, unclean or scratched lens/filter, etc.) that is causing blurred images. Can you post a sample?
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 2:
    Were the blurry ones on the card in the heavier camera? Or use the info and compare speeds/ISO between cameras.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    1) No, the card does not affect image quality. A low-quality card can fail on you and result in lost pics or much slower transfer. The SanDisk UltraII cards are very highly rated cards and will give you reliable performance as well as high speed ... whatever your camera can dish out.
    2) You said you were shooting in daylight. Did some of the subjects perhaps wander into the shadows or perhaps the camera's ISO/shutter speeds were set too low/slow?
    3) Another possibility is that there might have been too much light, resulting in areas being blown out. If these were one of the areas the camera was trying to AF onto, it would fail since there isn't something for the sensor to lock onto to determine "focus".
    I use a mixture of Kingston CF chips and Lexar Pro CF chips, also 512MB. The only time when my camera blurs on me is when I'm hand-holding a macro shot in dim light or when I've been less than gentle with my camera. ^_^;
    - Wing Wong

    See Wing's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10293

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10293

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: How to Shoot Photos with Blurry Backgrounds
    Hi, I have a digital Canon Powershot s400 camera, and I was wondering if that camera is able to create or shoot photos that has a blurred background, but the subject is clear. I don't know what to call that shot and if my camera is able to do that ... and how do I do that? Thanks a lot, and I am so happy to see find this site!
    - Ces A.

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Ces! I'm a beginner when it comes to these things, but I think you are referring to Depth of Field. My new camera has been doing it, mostly in auto mode (check out my flower pictures posted today and yesterday in my gallery). From what I understand, your aperture is what makes the background fuzzy or not (that is what I understood from my camera's manual - but I really look forward to a pro explaining it to you here). The book says that for the background to be out of focus you must have a large aperture, and to have both near and far objects in focus at the same time you should use a small aperture. ... But I'm hoping someone will confirm that for me ... Good luck and keep in touch!
    - Diane L. Dupuis-Kallos

    See Diane's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/QnAdetail.asp?threadID=10260

    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allDefinitions.asp#Depth
    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 3:
    Sorry I pressed the return key too many too fast. The style is called Selective Focusing, which has to do with the depth-of-field. For the definition of Depth-of-field, please see here:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allDefinitions.asp#Depth

    Basically, what you can do is to place the background further away from the subject, come closer to the subject, and use a larger aperture (SMALLER f/number like 2.8).

    Here is a discussion with your same situation with a similar camera:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/QnAdetail.asp?threadID=10260

    Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 4:
    Ces, Andy already posted the common technical term for it "Selective Focusing." In order to employ this technique - to control depth of field to make it what you want it - you need to be able to control lens aperture. Controlling lens aperture requires being able to run in an aperture priority or shutter priority auto-exposure mode, or in completely manual exposure mode. It's nearly impossible using a "program" autoexposure mode that selects both aperture AND shutter speed based on luminance level (how much light there is). In Program Mode, BOTH settings are adjusted by the AE system as the amount of light changes. The only possible method I'm aware of that can put lens aperture exactly where you want it (to get the depth of field desired) using Program AE is by being able to control the lighting level (as one can in a studio by changing the lighting power levels) and driving the "program" to the exposure that will use the lens aperture desired.

    The bad news about the Powershot S400:
    The only exposure mode is "Program AE" on this model Canon. You're left with the last, and very difficult method, of controlling lighting level to drive the program to the desired lens aperture, and that's if the camera will tell you what aperture it will use. Its specs on the Canon-USA Web site don't mention anything about displaying this for you.

    I truly wish I could tell you something better about how to use this technique with your camera. I use it very, very frequently; the desired depth of field is an important consideration in every photograph I make. There are times I want as much as possible too, not selective focusing. In looking at Canon's specs for the S400, I don't see a practical method for doing so with it.
    - John A. Lind

    See John's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 5:
    Be aware that with the majority of digital cameras (other than SLR types), the lenses used are very short focal length (10mm or less) to accommodate the small sensor size. This means that it is nigh impossible to get the out-of-focus background shots that are possible with SLR photography.

    For example, using f2.8 on a digital point-and-shoot camera (which would normally give a great out-of-focus background with an SLR) is the equivalent of about f15 on an SLR from a depth-of-field (DOF) standpoint. From an exposure standpoint, f2.8 on any camera is f2.8, but unfortunately this is not true for DOF. Even on digital SLRs some of the popular types (like the Canon 300D or Nikon D70) have sensors that are smaller than a 35mm frame by a factor of about 1.5 to 1.6. Thus, even with those the DOF (but not exposure) aperture is effectively multiplied by this number so that f2.8 on a Canon 300D is f2.8 for exposure but around f5 for DOF equivalent compared to a 35mm camera.
    - Chris

    ANSWER 6:
    I've been able to achieve this by setting focus to "Spot" or "Center weighted average" instead of "Multi-segment"... see example for the results.
    - Peter Daniel

    See Peter's Premium BetterPholio™

    See Sample Photo - White Flower:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=447940

    ANSWER 7:
    Digital cameras unlike film cameras do have a greater amount of depth of field. Everything is in focus. A couple of things may help. Set your ISO to 100 so the camera needs more light, creating a smaller f/stop number or larger opening. Another thing your can do in Photoshop is create a duplicate layer before cropping. Blur the image and then use the history brush or eraser to remove the blur on the close-up object. When done, remember to flatten the image and crop. There are other ways using continuous f/stop lenses with larger glass, but that would lead to a more expensive discussion. Good Luck
    - Gregg Vieregge

    ANSWER 8:
    Deph of field is accomplishd with your F/stop. A smaller number will give you less DOF, larger more. The smaller number is a wider aperture and the larger number is smaller. Unless you can take control of it physically, I don't see how you can do it. Some of the higher-end compacts do have various settings for portraits and so forth. Maybe you can find a setting there that will sort of work. I have tried to blur in Paint shop pro, and the results were not good at all. The best way is to try and do it with your lens,
    - Scott

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=10290

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=10290

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ASK YOUR OWN QUESTION ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Ask a question or answer a few from your fellow photographers:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/qnaTOC.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    READ PAST ISSUES OF THE SNAPSHOT NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Read previous issues of SnapShot in the BetterPhoto archives:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/snapshots.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    SIGN UP TO PHOTOFLASH AND THE DIGITAL PICTURE
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Join the fun and master the arts of traditional or digital photography! Participate or follow along as we discuss topics & lessons, practice assignments, and offer feedback on each others' work. Subscribe to our other two free newsletters - PhotoFlash and the Digital Darkroom - at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Get word of your product or service out to our rapidly growing list of 32964 subscribers.

    Learn more about advertising in SnapShot at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/g/advertise.asp

    Until next week, happy shooting!

    Thank you,
    Jim Miotke
    BetterPhoto.com

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    If you would rather not receive SnapShot, you may unsubscribe at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeun.asp?e=

    To change your email address, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeCOA.asp?e=

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Copyright 2005 BetterPhoto.com - All Rights Reserved. No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission.

  • Copyright © 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc.ģ All Rights Reserved.