BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, May 24, 2004
~~~~~~~~~~~

* SPOTLIGHT: There's Something for Everyone at BetterPhoto's Summer School
* BETTERPHOTO: View the April Showcase of Contest Winners
* BETTERPHOTO: Design Great Images with Tony Sweet ... in the Field!
* FEATURED GALLERY: Animal Antics: Oh So Cute and Funny!
* FEATURED PLACE: Australia: Plenty of Upside to Shooting Down Under
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Cameras and Pens / Movie Who-Done-It
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Rules for Breaking the Rules ... By Kerry Drager
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Scanning: Prints Vs. Negative
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Concert Shots and Model Releases
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: White Balance: What, Why, How
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Tips on Night Photography
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Setting Cameras to Infinity
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: How to Stop the Puck in Hockey Shots
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Help Me with This Camera
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Digital B/W and Filters
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: JPEG Files on CD
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Flash Recycling Times for Weddings
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Shooting My First Wedding and I'm Terrified.
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Shooting Photos of Moving Horses
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: How to Use
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 14: Help: Polarizing Filters and Conversion Lenses
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 15: Image Lag with Digital
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 16: Medium Format and Digital
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: How to Ask Strangers If I Can Take a Photo of Them
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: The Scoop on Gray Cards


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There's Something for Everyone at BetterPhoto's Summer School
Are you struggling to gain a better understanding of the art and technique of photography? At BetterPhoto, we have an exciting lineup of online courses on a wide variety of subjects. Most classes fit into one of the following categories: beginning; digital; lighting and exposure; composition and the art of seeing; specialty subjects; shooting technique; PhotoShop; and business and marketing. But you may want to hurry. Although we're still in the spring session, some courses for summer are already full! For details on BetterPhoto's entire lineup of online classes, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to the 161st issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Each month, we are blown away by the caliber of BetterPhoto contest images. And, if you have not yet seen them, the April winners are absolutely stunning! For more details and a link, see the BetterPhoto Update item below.

Also this week, take a visual tour "down under" in Featured Place, and in Featured Gallery, see why cute and funny animals make such great subjects. In addition, check out instructor Tony Sweet's upcoming field workshop, and in Photo Tip, read instructor Kerry Drager's "rules" for breaking the rules of composition. And, as always, there's an excellent selection of questions and answers.

That's it for now. Have an enjoyable week of photography!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
View the April Showcase of Contest Winners
Congratulations go to Scott Stulberg for his Grand Prize winning photo of a "little Burmese girl." Kudos also go to Bob Cornelison, Doug Benner, Mark Pelton, Andre Marhaug, and Adam Cowart for their terrific First Place prize winning images. Of course, the second-place finishers and the finalists deserve praise, too! Besides the viewing enjoyment value of the monthly contest, don't overlook the inspiration and education benefits either. For instance, analyze how light, composition, and other creative techniques turn often-ordinary subjects into eye-catching images. View the contest shots at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/contest/winners/0404.asp


*****
Design Great Images with Tony Sweet ... in the Field!
Join BetterPhoto instructor and author Tony Sweet for an exciting, and enlightening, field workshop this summer! This event, "Image Design in Nature," will take place on beautiful Whidbey Island in Washington state, August 23-27, 2004. The five-day workshop will focus on image design, with the group working as much as possible at dawn and dusk. Tony will share compositional and design techniques that will be demonstrated in the field and illustrated during slide presentations. Find out all the details through the Coupeville Arts Center at:
http://www.coupevillearts.org/

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FEATURED GALLERY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Animal Antics: Oh So Cute and Funny!
When it comes to catching the peak of the animal action, AND the peak of cuteness, it really pays to keep a camera handy! Whether around the house, down at the farm, at the zoo, or while visiting a park or preserve, BetterPhoto shooters have captured pets and other animals in delightful - and sometimes downright amazing - "poses"! For viewing fun, check out BetterPhoto's "Cute and Funny Animal Pictures" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=360

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FEATURED PLACE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Australia: Plenty of Upside to Shooting Down Under
In Australia, great subjects abound, including the country's famed photographic specialties: Ayers Rock (Uluru) and the Sydney Opera House. But BetterPhoto shooters have also focused their cameras on other outstanding subjects: such as wonderful water reflections, eye-catching architecture, great landscapes, and beautiful cityscapes. As with all travel photography, beautiful light is a key ingredient: with scenes shot from dawn to dusk ... and in nighttime too. For ideas and inspiration, check out BetterPhoto's "Australia Pictures" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=182

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Last week, we asked:
Which author said the following: "The camera need not be a cold mechanical device. Like a pen, it is as good as the [person] who uses it. It can be the expression of mind and heart."

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Kelly Phillips is:
John Steinbeck in reference to photojournalist Robert Capa.

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Movie Who-Done-It - entered by BetterPhoto member Blanca Acosta

There's an Italian film where a photographer discovers a body accidentally when enlarging a photo. What are the names of the film and its director?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Rules for Breaking the Rules ... By Kerry Drager
If you plan to break a compositional rule for creative effect, then it's usually best to go all the way and reeeeeeally break it! In other words, make it perfectly clear that "rule" breaking was indeed your objective. Examples:

  • Horizon: A slightly sloping horizon line usually appears to be an unintentional, and distracting, mistake. But a radical tilt - to produce a strong diagonal line and a distinctive look - will appear to be the photographer's artistic aim.

  • Distortion: Tilt your camera while using a wide-angle lens, and buildings or trees will seem to lean. Although MINOR bending of vertical lines often makes a subject look clumsy, MAJOR distortion can transform a straightforward world into a unique and interpretive one. How? Move in tight with a wide-angle and aim upward or downward. Why? To convey a sense of movement or visual energy; or to emphasize distance, depth, or height.

  • Of course, whether such rule-breaking will be a visual success is another matter. One more "rule": When in doubt and if it's possible, shoot the scene both ways. After all, there's nothing like comparison!

    Visit kerrydrager.com - Get your own Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

    Add Your Own Tip:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
    My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:

    • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
    • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
    • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
    You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

    BetterPhoto.com
    P.O. Box 2781
    Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

    To order online, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    NEW QUESTION 1: Scanning: Prints Vs. Negative
    I have recently become a digital convert, and would like to start digitizing some of my best 35mm images. Unfortunately, not being the most organized of people, it's not always easy to find the negatives corresponding to the prints. Is there much quality difference (which can't be tweaked by PS) between scanned prints and scanned negatives? Thanks.
    - Steve McCormack

    ANSWER 1:
    You WILL notice a difference between a scanned negative and a scanned print ... particularly if the negative was scanned with a good dedicated film scanner at 4000 DPI. Scanning prints is similar to making a copy of a copy. I doubt that you will be able to capture the quality of the original.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9658

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9658

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 2: Concert Shots and Model Releases
    I have taken photos at concerts and then had the performers autograph the photos. Could this take the place of a model release?
    - Steve McCroskey

    See Steve's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    No. A model release is something they would sign releasing their right to have a say in what you do with their likeness. People in the entertainment industry, I have heard, can be nasty about this because their likeness is their logo.
    - Jerry Frazier

    See Jerry's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9654

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9654

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 3: White Balance: What, Why, How
    What can anyone tell me about white balance? I am considering buying a digital camera and don't understand that. Is it something that you have to set every time you want to take a picture manually, or does the camera set it? If you were going to change from a film camera to digital, would the actual picture-taking process be the same, and you would just need to learn about a program like Photoshop? Or are they two totally different photographic processes? I can't quite decide if digital is for me or not.
    - Pam

    ANSWER 1:
    White balance has to do with the color of light you're shooting under. There's an automatic white balance, and you can just use that and let your camera decide every time. However, there are certain situations in which you'd probably want to adjust it. For example, if you're indoors, your light bulbs are probably going to be tungsten. If you don't adjust the white balance and don't use the flash, all of your pics will have a yellowish cast because tungsten lights give off yellow light. There are many different lighting conditions (natural light, fluorescent light, etc.), and with digital you have the ability to adjust to those conditions. But if you're not picky, you could just leave it on automatic. You can also change the white balance afterward in Photoshop. But it's usually better to do it when you're taking the pic. Hope that helps.
    - Nancy Grace Chen

    See Nancy's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9645

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9645

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 4: Tips on Night Photography
    I am shooting at night on Saturday and need some advice. I have not taken too many shots at night and the ones I took weren't so great. Which is better: a smaller aperture and a slower shutter speed, or a larger aperture and a faster shutter speed? I will be using my Canon, with a telephoto lens, 400 and 800 speed color film. Most of the photos will be still life and neon lights. Thanks!
    - Melissa J. Miller

    See Melissa's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    Well, your aperture depends on what you are doing. If you want a large DOF (depth of field) - like if you're doing a skyline - then you need a small aperture. This will require a slow shutter speed. I've had to do 25-second exposures to make it work. Therefore, a tripod is a MUST. If you're doing it handheld, your shots are going to be totally blurry. Hope that helps.
    - Nancy Grace Chen

    See Nancy's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9639

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9639

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 5: Setting Cameras to Infinity
    I've read a few articles on different types of photography and have seen in some photo's to set your camera's focus to infinity. What exactly is this and how do you do it? Currently I use a Minolta Maxum 3xi, and even more my Canon Rebel Ti. Thanks for any help.
    - Christopher A. Shaw

    ANSWER 1:
    I assume you are referring to setting the focus to the hyperfocal distance, where all objects from 1/2 that distance to infinity appear in focus. To utilize this, you need a lens with a focus distance scale. Many inexpensive zooms do not have a distance scale and so cannot be set for hyperfocal. Most Canon autofocus cameras have a DEP or ADEP (Depth of Field) function that offers a work-around for lenses without a distance scale.

    For lenses that have both a distance scale and depth of field scale, one sets the hyperfocal distance by simply setting the infinity focus symbol above the depth of field line for the aperture set. The near focus can then be read from that aperture's DoF mark on the other side of the focus mark.

    For lenses without a depth of field scale, you need a DoF calculator or a card printed with the hyperfocal distance for common focal lengths and apertures. There are many available - just do a Google search on depth of field calculator or hyperfocal distance. I like the program f/Calc from http://www.tangentsoft.net/. Determine the hyperfocal distance for the focal length and aperture you are using, then set focus to that distance.

    With a Canon EOS camera and lens without a focus distance scale you can use the DEP/ADEP exposure mode. In this mode you focus on the near then far objects you want to be within the depth of field, then the camera selects the appropriate aperture to accomplish it.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9636

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9636

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 6: How to Stop the Puck in Hockey Shots
    I'm having trouble "stopping the puck" in hockey photos. Occasionally, I get lucky, and the puck is clear, as well as the players. Usually, something is just a little blurred. How do I get the clean crisp shot seen in Sports Illustrated or in newspapers? I'm using 800 speed film for action (and the unreliable lighting in most rinks), usually a 70-210 lens, and a Canon AE-1 Program (it's old but reliable). I've tried different settings, but so far none seem any better than the "program" setting. Looking at the photos, it almost seems it's a lighting problem, but how do I fix that? You can't use flash in the arena, it reflects off the glass anyway, and sometimes the distance is too far for it to help.
    - Pam S. DeGraaf

    ANSWER 1:
    The professionals for SI and newspapers are no doubt using f/2 and f/2.8 lenses, where your maximum aperture is probably f/4 or f/5.6. So where you might be getting only 1/60 shutter speed, they can get 1/125-1/500.
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 2:
    SI use flashes mounted up in the ceiling. Some newspapers do too, depending on the paper. But in a pro game, the arena is bright enough to get 1/250 or 1/500 from a 2.8 lens, so a newspaper could get pictures if they aren't able to use strobes.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    Fuji 800 has close to a two-stop range. Do some testing, and bump your shutter speed up to find out how fast you can go and still get a good image.
    - Kai T. Eiselein

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9627

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9627

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 7: Help Me with This Camera
    Help, you photo geniuses! I have found a Hollywood Reflex TLR. On the box there is a sticker that says sightseer. I have searched high and low to try to find out more info on this camera - what it's worth, how much it went for, etc. Let me know if you have any ideas!
    - James Boone

    ANSWER 1:
    All I know is what I found with a Google search: It's a cheap, American-made TLR from the late 40's; made by Craftex Products Corp.; about $30 new in 1948 dollars and is worth about the same in 2004 dollars. A slow (f/7.7) 2-element lens, and probably used the long discontinued 620 film instead of 120/220.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9626

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9626

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 8: Digital B/W and Filters
    I normally shoot with film, but am considering a DSLR. I am curious, however: Do filters work the same way digitally as they do on film? For example, a red filter plus a polarizer shot on black-and-white film produces a near black sky, with almost pure white clouds; an effect I really like. But since digital records all color information and then converts, will adding filters like this just mess up the image? Thanks to those who respond.
    - Brent D. Seefried

    ANSWER 1:
    It does have the same effects. Red and orange makes the blues darker after you go to grey scale. But you have contrast and lightness control on digital, so there's really no need to shoot with a filter on the lens. Use the extra light and you don't have to see everything in whatever color filter you're using.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9620

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9620

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 9: JPEG Files on CD
    We all know that JPEG files degrade each time they are compressed and uncompressed. My question is: What happens if I burn them on a CD write and close the CD. My understanding is that once a CD is burned, the content cannot be changed. What happens with JPEGs in this situation? Would they not be like negatives that don't change however many times you open them, or am I wrong on the CD write process?
    - Melinda W.

    ANSWER 1:
    It is my understanding that JPEGs compress only when "saved." You can open/close without saving and will not lose any data - same for copying. Copying the files does not invoke the JPEG compression scheme. With respect to data loss through compression, the storage media on which the file resides does not matter.

    As an aside, however, there is some evidence that CD-Rs may be far less than "permanent" storage media. Depending on the CD-R maker and dye used for recording, some dyes can fade in a few years exposure to light/humidity, with resultant loss of data or files.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9614

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9614

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 10: Flash Recycling Times for Weddings
    Hi there. I've recently bought a Nikon SB800 flash for my Nikon F90X to photograph weddings. But I'm very disappointed with the recycling times; after my first wedding with this flash, I found that the second or third picture that I took in a sequence (i.e., the exchanging of rings or speech shots) would come out underexposed - I assume because the flash hasn't recycled quick enough. I had practiced beforehand with the flash, but hadn't realized this to be a problem. Do any other photographers find this a problem when it is necessary to use a flash in a wedding, and does anyone have a solution??
    - Marianne Miss Leather

    ANSWER 1:
    Are you using the SD-800 Quick Recycling Battery Pack, which adds a 5th AA cell to speed recycling? Rechargeable Ni-Cd or Ni-MH batteries will recycle in about half the time of alkalines (but have shorter life before needing to be recharged).

    Otherwise you need a high-power external battery pack, like Nikon's SD-8A, those offered by Quantum Instruments and others, or a do-it-yourself rig (link) if you are clever and not concerned with warranties and such. ;)
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 2:
    I had that problem, too, when I first got my new flash. I have found that batteries differ a lot between brands. Duracell has been the best workhorse for me.
    - Rhonda L. Tolar

    ANSWER 3:
    Thanks for your responses. I do use the 5th battery, and have been using Jessops rechargeable Ni-MH. I hadn't thought about using a different brand - maybe Jessops are slower than others. I may also try the external battery pack. Many thanks.
    - Marianne Miss Leather

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9613

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9613

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 11: Shooting My First Wedding and I'm Terrified.
    I would just like someone to help me with a few questions on my first wedding. Should I have the couple sign a contract? Where am I allowed to be during the ceremony? Do I need to talk to the minister before the wedding? Just any tips anybody can give me to help me through. Thank You.
    - Tamela L. Weese

    ANSWER 1:
    First, take a deep breath. Yes, you should have a contract. You might be able to find a simple one online.
    ALWAYS talk to the minister. He/she will let you know where you can or cannot be during the ceremony. You also need to find out if you can use your flash during the ceremony. Most allow flash photos of at least the processional and recessional. Others don't allow any photos at all during the ceremony. Always check in advance.
    Take at least two cameras, extra batteries, and plenty of film. (I forgot the film once.) Find someone who knows who is who in the families and wedding party. They can be a big help in getting people rounded up for group photos.
    Always stay calm, and be prepared for the unexpected.
    - Kai T. Eiselein

    ANSWER 2:
    You are scared because you have normal common sense. You've taken on a serious responsibility. Having said that, as long as you have practiced with your camera and flash, with the subject matter, places, and distances you will be shooting, and your shots look OK, relax and enjoy the shoot.
    Color negative film has some latitude if you happen to be a stop or two off. Be SURE the flash synchronization speed is set right in your camera's shutter function. Be SURE the film speed is set right. Kai's suggestion on getting a helper to round up people for groups shots is dead-on.
    - Doug Nelson

    Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9605

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9605

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 12: Shooting Photos of Moving Horses
    I was just needing some information on taking pictures of horses while they are moving. I've been taking people pictures for years now, but not animals, which is quite different. I went to practice taking some pics of horses while they were walking slowly, and all those pictures came out blurry, and I'm not sure why. I had my camera set on the action mode and I don't really have too much time to practice, so does anyone have any advice for me ... please?? Thanks so much.
    - Carrie

    ANSWER 1:
    Everything blurry or just the feet and head? If the light and your film just won't combine for a fast enough shutter speed, then action mode doesn't do any more for you.
    Practice panning with a moving object, so that you will get better at getting a picture of something at various shutter speeds. Next time, just use a faster shutter speed than what you used before - by aperture or by using a faster film.
    You can practice panning by taking pictures of cars going down the street at different shutter speeds: 125th, 1/60th, even some as low as 1/15th.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Hi. I am an intermediate amateur and wonder if camera shake is a problem. What is your film, and what is your shutter speed and aperture? I love horses myself.
    - Kathryn

    ANSWER 3:
    Thanks for your help. I was using 200 speed film, but I was using the action mode, so I didn't set the aperture or shutter speed.
    - Carrie

    ANSWER 4:
    Hi Try a faster film, and then if that isn't sufficient work on your aperture and shutter speeds being different out of the action mode.
    - Kathryn

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9601

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9601

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 13: How to Use
    Hi. I have a Nikon N80 and would like to use the "Bulb" mode for taking photographs in the night. I understand that a tripod is needed and I also have a manual "cable release". My questions are: 1) What should be the f/stop? 2) Does film speed make much difference? 3) What difference would it make if I use the "Self Timer" instead of the "cable release"? Thanks.
    - Phal

    ANSWER 1:
    Hello Phal. 1) The f/stop will have a role to play, but it really depends on how much depth of field you want/need. Obviously, the larger the aperture is open the smaller the DOF. Pretty much the same rules apply for bulb as they do with any other setting. 2) Yes, the film speed does make a difference. Keep in mind that the faster the film, the more sensitive it is to light. In Bulb mode, you run into the reciprocity effect (not really a failure in my book), and your color will shift. I recommend 100-speed film (or lower) for Bulb photography. 3) It doesn't really make a significant difference using the self-timer or the cable release. The thing that matters is that you don't have camera movement (i.e., touching the camera) during the exposure. Hope that helps.
    - John Wright

    ANSWER 2:
    As mentioned, the f/stop will depend upon DOF requirements if the scene includes foreground elements. If you are shooting only a distant landscape that can be focused at infinity, use a medium-wide aperture (f-4 to f-5.6) to optimize lens clarity. ASA 100 is my recommendation also, for it's fine grain. The only time you'll need to use "bulb" is if your scene requires more exposure time than your camera's longest shutter speed (N80 is 30 seconds). Any speed less than that, you can use the timer. It's difficult to get an accurate exposure reading when shooting at night, so it's wise to take several shots at different shutter speeds.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9596

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9596

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 14: Help: Polarizing Filters and Conversion Lenses
    Hi. I have a Fuji 602 camera with an adaptor tube with a 52mm thread on it to take my wide-angle and telephoto converters. I am looking at buying a polarizing filter. Can I buy a 52mm filter and use it between my adaptor ring and conversion lens (so I only need to buy one filter), or do I need to buy one for each lens to fit on the front as they are all different size front threads? Any advice appreciated.
    - Mark Hemsworth

    ANSWER 1:
    If your adaptor ring and the conversion lens use the same screw-on type filter, then it is possible to buy just one set of filters with the largest mount. Then use a step-up ring on the smaller lens for the filters. I have lenses with 52mm, 55mm and 62mm, and I only need a set of filters with 62mm thread. Not only don't you need 3 sets of filters, the step-up ring is very cheap (usually less than $10) and there is absolutely no vignetting on the smaller lens. You can use almost all filters - polarizer, color correction, soft, special effect and even hard/soft edge split filters. The only filters I recommend you to buy separately for each lens are the GRADUATED split filters. Also, it is a good idea to get a lens cap (very cheap) for each step-up ring. This is for protection of your lenses so you can leave the step-up ring on all the time. Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9595

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9595

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 15: Image Lag with Digital
    I am new to digital, and the Canon 10D seems to have a lag from what I see in the viewfinder and what is recorded. Is this normal? It is difficult to get used to transferring from 35mm film.
    - Jeanne Griffith

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Jeanne. There seems to be several people with a similar "problem." The 10D should have no delay between you hitting the shutter release fully down and the shutter actually opening. The image recorded is about 20ms after what you are seeing as the viewfinder blacks out (as the mirror lifts). If you are seeing a noticeable delay, check the custom function settings, particularly mirror-lock, and reset everything to default and try again. What type of camera are you coming from? If you moved from EOS film SLR, your 10D should behave exactly the same. Cheers.
    - Dave Cross

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9586

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9586

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 16: Medium Format and Digital
    Not to beat a dead horse, and I really am not making judgment: Does a top-of-the-line digital SLR replace a medium format (MF) film camera? In other words, are the results about the same as far as image size, clarity, sharpness, etc.?
    - Jerry Frazier

    See Jerry's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Jerry. A top-end DSLR will compete with 35mm film resolution in most cases. There are notable exceptions where film scores (low light, etc.), there are fewer times when digital wins out (mainly "instant gratification" factor). In my opinion, digital has a long way to go to compete with MF particularly with the "look" of MF - e.g., the H-U-G-E depth of field available on landscape shots, and even 35mm film simply cannot compete. Look at some of the old (50's) U.S. advertising posters (mainly found in TexMex restaurants in Europe), pin-sharp from about 4 feet to the mountains in the distance, wow!!

    A lot depends on your application. If 35mm will do the job for you, then a DSLR will be more than adequate. If you insist on the MF "look," stick with the real thing :-) Just my 2c. Cheers.
    - Dave Cross

    ANSWER 2:
    Hello Jerry. My 2c is I agree with Dave - well put.
    - Pamela CM Lammersen

    Visit pcmlphotography.com - Pamela's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9582

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9582

    back to top

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: How to Ask Strangers If I Can Take a Photo of Them
    I love watching strangers, passersby, and believe there are so many opportunities missed - in taking photos I mean. How do I best approach a stranger to ask if I can take a/some photos of them without making it a big fuss or deal (i.e., signing release papers, etc.), and then be allowed to publish the photos???
    - Nicole S. McGrade

    See Nicole's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Nicole, I love to watch people as well. I am not shy and have never had much trouble walking up to people. I must say it was a little odd at first, even to a chatty gal like myself. What is a shock is how pleased most are to have their picture taken. Just the other day I was driving with my family out in the country and saw an elderly man sitting on the porch of an old cypress wood house. I could not resist. I pulled over and introduced myself, said that I would be honored to photograph him, if I may. He was so cute, he got all excited. Next I thing I knew, a little lady in pink sponge rollers came out, and they were just so sweet. I always ask for their address and mail them a copy. The one I am speaking of I have just listed in the "People" category of the contest for this month titled "The South". It is my understanding that once you gain permission and you take the photo, the copyright is yours.
    - Tonya Autry

    ANSWER 2:
    One thing worth mentioning about issues of copyright. If you are intending to publish the photos (and receive money for them) or use them for any commercial interests, it is necessary to obtain a signed model release form from the subject (spoken permission is not sufficient). For personal photos, there is no need, however. Don't let the issue of model releases stop you from losing out on great photos!
    - Mark Mobley

    ANSWER 3:
    You should always have some model releases in your camera bag. I think there might even be an example lurking around this site. I can't remember exactly where I found the one I use. The also have a notebook for their address. My question: Is it OK to snap first and get permission second?
    - Fax Sinclair

    ANSWER 4:
    I find it easier to approach a person if I have a business type card to hand them. This card has my name and states that I am a free-lance photographer. You can include any other information that you think is important. I make these cards on my computer and can include a background of one of my photos. This lets the person know I am a serious photographer. Good luck.
    - C.J. Williamson

    ANSWER 5:
    For anyone who's interested, there are some good example releases on this site:
    http://www.robinprior.net/info7.html

    Nancy
    nance.c@poboxes.com
    nacespace.com/photos
    - Nancy Grace Chen

    See Nancy's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 6:
    Hello Nicole. All good points above. I keep model releases in my camera bag at all times, and I am also one of those obnoxious people that won't miss out on a "photo op." I say, go for it - but like Mark said, if the shot is for profit, get the signed release, since there is no point asking for trouble, and it only takes a second. Get some biz cards printed up - that way your subject doesn't have to worry about "where did I put that piece of paper?" Good luck, and keep shooting.
    - Pamela CM Lammersen

    Visit pcmlphotography.com - Pamela's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9492

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9492

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: The Scoop on Gray Cards
    What are 18% grey cards? Thanks.
    - Anita

    ANSWER 1:
    They are exactly what it says. It's a card (usually stiff cardboard) that is colored 18% grey. Why are they 18% grey? They are 18% grey because that is the value that all light meters see and meter for.
    - John Wright

    ANSWER 2:
    Think of a scale that's black and white. At one end, you have totally black, and at the other end, you have totally white. In between, you have shades that gradually go to increasing lighter shades of gray till they go from black to white. Somewhere in there, there's a shade of grey that's 18%. It's kinda like room temperature - in that's it's considered normal. So to expose that shade of grey correctly would be correct exposure for anything that is under the same lighting.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    And just to add some more clarity (a lot of new budding photographers don't know this about their cameras, and it has a profound impact upon your exposures): The camera, in effect, is "calibrated" to see everything as a medium gray.
    So, if you photograph a black cat, and your camera's auto settings say "This is the right exposure!", you'll be disappointed to find a much paler, overexposed, gray cat on your final picture. Why? Because the camera "assumes" the subject would be correctly exposed as a medium gray ... rather than black.
    Similarly, when you photograph white snow on auto settings, the snow in the resulting picture will be gray. The camera doesn't know that snow should be white, the cat should be black, etc. It assumes the average exposure of your photo should be gray.
    So metering off a gray card in each shooting situation can give you much more control over your final exposure.
    - George Corbin

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9484

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9484

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ASK YOUR OWN QUESTION ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Ask a question or answer a few from your fellow photographers:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/qnaTOC.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    READ PAST ISSUES OF THE SNAPSHOT NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Read previous issues of SnapShot in the BetterPhoto archives:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/snapshots.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    SIGN UP TO PHOTOFLASH AND THE DIGITAL PICTURE
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Join the fun and master the arts of traditional or digital photography! Participate or follow along as we discuss topics & lessons, practice assignments, and offer feedback on each others' work. Subscribe to our other two free newsletters - PhotoFlash and the Digital Darkroom - at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Get word of your product or service out to our rapidly growing list of 30283 subscribers.

    Learn more about advertising in SnapShot at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/g/advertise.asp

    Until next week, happy shooting!

    Thank you,
    Jim Miotke
    BetterPhoto.com

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    If you would rather not receive SnapShot, you may unsubscribe at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeun.asp?e=

    To change your email address, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeCOA.asp?e=

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Copyright 2005 BetterPhoto.com - All Rights Reserved. No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission.

    Copyright 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.