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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, May 03, 2004
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* SPOTLIGHT: Showcase - And Sell - Your Photography Online!
* FEATURED GALLERY: Riding the Wave: Water Sports
* FEATURED PLACE: High Drama in the High Sierra
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Part-time Photographer / Che Guevara Photo
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: How to Avoid Vignetting ... By Kerry Drager
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: I Need Professional-Quality Enlargements
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Protective Filter ... What's That?!?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Copyright Infringement on Digital
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Best Lens for Shooting Soccer
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: What Does the DOF Preview Button do?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Tripods and Salt Water
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: How to Limit the DOF
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Photographing Horses Jumping Fences
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Black and White from Color Film?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Digital Vs. Film: The Facts of Life :)
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Surfing Photography
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Help With Outside Shots!
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: Studio Shooting Snag
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 14: How to Shoot Night Pictures
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: How to Avoid Glare in Eyeglasses
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Setting Up Self-Portraits
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 3: Shooting Moonlit Scenes


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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Showcase - And Sell - Your Photography Online!
With a Deluxe BetterPholio™ by BetterPhoto.com, you can display up to 1000 of your favorite images in a portfolio gallery. Also, with the optional add-on Image Sales module, you can even take credit card payments for your pictures! BetterPhoto makes getting your own site hassle-free by taking care of all the technical issues and offering a single, comprehensive package. For all the details on Deluxe BetterPholios™, go to:
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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 158th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Things are going great at BetterPhoto this spring, and it continues with the launch of a new weekly SnapShot feature: Featured Place. Beginning with this issue, we'll spotlight the travel gallery of a picturesque park, city, or country, with eye-catching photographs by BetterPhoto members and instructors. Read more about the inaugural Featured Place below!

Also in this week's SnapShot, check out the Featured Gallery on water sports, This Week's Tip on vignetting by instructor Kerry Drager, Photo Trivia, and a great array of Q&A subjects.

Incidentally, BetterPhoto's summer photo school schedule has been posted. We are offering such a wide array of online photo courses - in fact, there's something for almost any photographer! If you need help in the selection process, be sure to review our course categories page at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/categories.asp

Enjoy ... and happy shooting!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124

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FEATURED GALLERY
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Riding the Wave: Water Sports
When the weather turns warm, lakes, oceans, and rivers turn into such cool subjects! For photographers, this means lots of opportunities to catch water sports - from surfing to kayaking. Shooting tips? Plan on putting all of your lenses to use - from wide to telephoto - and also plan to experiment: by stopping the action or showing the motion. For instance, freeze a waterskier with a fast shutter speed, or create a real sense of whitewater excitement by panning a raft with a slow shutter speed. For shooting ideas and inspiration, check out BetterPhoto's "Surfing Pictures, Kayak Pictures, and Water Sports" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=139

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FEATURED PLACE
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High Drama in the High Sierra
At Yosemite National Park, Ansel Adams developed his photography AND his reputation - all in glorious black and white. But as BetterPhoto members and instructors have since proved, this mountain showplace in California's Sierra Nevada looks great in color too!

Besides the famed attractions (i.e., Half Dome, El Capitan and tall waterfalls), there's so much more of visual interest - from intimate details to wildlife to a picturesque mountain chapel. Best yet, at Yosemite, the out-of-doors is never out-of-season: wildflowers and rushing water in spring, the grand landscapes of the summer tourist season, the colors of autumn, and the magnificence of winter. For inspiration, check out BetterPhoto's "Yosemite Park Pictures" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=415

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
In the movie Mad Dog and Glory, Robert De Niro plays a mild-mannered man with an interest in photography; what does he do for a living?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Cate Gow is:
Wayne Dobie, as played by Robert De Niro, is a shy police photographer

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Che Guevara Photo - entered by BetterPhoto member Blanca Acosta

There's an ultra-famous photo of Che Guevara, where he's looking at the horizon wearing his famous beret with a star, reproduced in cards, T-shirts, and what-not. Who took the shot?


Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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How to Avoid Vignetting ... By Kerry Drager
Although vignetting (dark corners on your picture) sometimes can be used for creative advantage, it's most often a technical glitch that can mar an otherwise fine photo. With an SLR, you should be able to see vignetting in the viewfinder - just point the camera at the sky and take a look. In any case, vignetting usually occurs from any one, or any combination, of the following:

  • The wrong-size hood or shade for your lens; in most cases, hoods are not interchangeable.
  • The stacking of filters (using more than one filter at a time) - especially with the addition of a lens hood and especially with the use of a wide-angle lens.
  • Using a polarizing filter with an extreme wide-angle lens, since polarizers are thicker than other filters. Either skip the polarizer altogether or buy one of the thin/slim-style models now on the market.

  • Lastly: When in doubt, check the manufacturer’s filter/hood specifications for your particular lens.
    Good luck out there!

    Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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    NEW QUESTION 1: I Need Professional-Quality Enlargements
    I live in Ohio and am trying to start my own photography business, but I need to know where to send my film to get that professional look to it. Wal-Mart and Meijers just don't do it. I've used Clark in the past but they're not that great. Any suggestions on where to send my film would be helpful!
    - Brianne Neri

    ANSWER 1:
    Hello, Brianne. Although I don't live in Ohio I wanted to mention to you not to be afraid when you go to the lab - that if you are not happy with the processing to tell them you want a redo. Be sure that your exposures, etc., are not to blame first. But if you are sure it isn't that, feel free to tell them what you expect. Let them know what you are doing with the prints and normally these places will work with you to obtain a finish you are happy with.

    You are correct with Wal-Mart-style processing (not that there is anything wrong with them for regular stuff), but you don't go to a builder to get your car fixed - if you know what I mean. I would suggest to go and visit some of the labs and chat with them ... maybe even bring in a sample of the quality you expect, prefer or whatever. Also remember that depending on your film, exposure, lighting, subject and all that good stuff, sometimes a lab can only do so much. (I'm not saying you don't shoot well :-)Hope it helps, and be brave! :-)
    - Pamela CM Lammersen

    Visit pcmlphotography.com - Pamela's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9344

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9344

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    NEW QUESTION 2: Protective Filter ... What's That?!?
    I am a beginner with a new Nikon N80 camera. I've only used it on auto but am reading to learn how to use it more fully. Someone told me I need a filter to protect my lens (Nikkor 28-100mm 1:3.5-5.6G). Is this right? If so, how in the world do I know what kind to get, and how does it attach to my camera? Thanks so much.
    - Lynn

    ANSWER 1:
    Though not required, a filter can help protect your lens from dust and scratches. They are threaded, and screw into the front of your lens. You can determine what size to get by looking inside your lens cap. (The filter size will be indicated in millimeters). Most people get a Skylight, or a UV/Haze, filter as lens protection, since their effects are subtle and they don't require any exposure compensation.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9343

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9343

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    NEW QUESTION 3: Copyright Infringement on Digital
    Here is a question that was brought up by a fellow on my lists at Yahoo groups: He was accused of copyright infringement by a company. Since he took the photo digitally, he has no negs. So how do you prove it?
    - RJ Baynum

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi RJ. This could be interesting. I suggest that the first place to go is the original file from the camera (before any editing was performed). Many mid to high-end digital cameras record all sorts of useful data in the file. My EOS-D60 records my name, date and time and the body serial number (encrypted so it can only be read by the Canon supplied software) in the jpeg metadata. You have to use the original file because most image manipulation software destroys any non-standard metadata. Obviously, any digital data can be faked, so I've no idea how well this would stand up in court (particularly as I'm in the UK, so any legal stuff would be incorrect anyway).

    Exactly what is your friend accused of stealing? How likely is it that he took an identical photograph to one taken by the company?? Let us all know how you get on ... copyright is something we (photographers) all have to worry about. Cheers.
    - Dave Cross

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9334

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9334

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    NEW QUESTION 4: Best Lens for Shooting Soccer
    For sports photography, which lens would suit me best? I'm talking soccer, and forget price ... just tell me the best for my Canon EOS digital. I want clear, close shots for printing. If Sigma or Tamron makes such a lens, great, but I would prefer Canon.
    - Nick Milton

    ANSWER 1:
    For soccer, your action could be across the field or close-in. Canon's digital SLR's, except for the 1DS, have a multiplication factor, so an 80-200 xoom becomes about a 125-305. This might just be your lens for this. The "L" lenses have the best optical characteristics and will have "IS" (Image Stabilization). I'd still use a monopod, if it were me.
    - Doug Nelson

    Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9332

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    NEW QUESTION 5: What Does the DOF Preview Button do?
    Hi, Can I ask what the depth of field preview button does in a Nikon F80? How does it exactly help you? Sorry, I am a beginner in photography :/ Thanks!
    - Daniel Kasenda

    ANSWER 1:
    It makes the lens close down to what the aperture is set at, so you can see what the depth of field looks like before taking the picture. The aperture affects the size of the area that appears in focus of a photograph, so if you needed to check to see where and what was falling within that area, you use the DOF preview to see it.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9323

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9323

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    NEW QUESTION 6: Tripods and Salt Water
    Does anyone have any experience using a tripod in salt water? And suggestions as to which brand can stand up to occasional use at the beach while exposed to salt water?
    - Bill Howe

    ANSWER 1:
    I don't know of any particular one that resists salt water more than others, but I would recommend general care for any tripod. After getting home, rinse it off thoroughly and dry it. Check for any water up in the shafts by sliding the legs in, and extending back out and dry them again. Then leave it overnight with the legs fully extended. Whenever I use a monopod on a cold night, I leave it fully extended after I get home so I don't get moisture from condensation sitting up inside it.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9320

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9320

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    NEW QUESTION 7: How to Limit the DOF
    I have recently upgraded to a Maxxum 5 from a Maxxum Stsi and was confused about the DOF preview function. I want to take some portraits or close-up shots where the background would be blurry but the object sharp - i.e., limit the depth of field. I understand that a larger aperture would achieve this, but when I look through the viewfinder with the DOF preview, the screen is bright ... and at smaller apertures, the viewfinder is dark. As a rule of thumb, to limit the DOF, the brighter the viewfinder, the better? And should I use the recommended shutter speed by the camera? Or is a faster shutter speed better?
    - Jason

    ANSWER 1:
    Yes, generally speaking, the brighter the viewfinder when you use the DOF preview the more you'll limit the depth of field. The reason it's brighter is because the larger aperture lets in more light and the smaller the aperture the darker. To compensate for a larger aperture (more light) you need a faster shutter speed and vice versa for a smaller aperture. If your camera has an Aperture Priority mode, then when you tell the camera what size aperture you want it should make the appropriate adjustments to the shutter speed to give the right exposure.
    - Jordan

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9318

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    NEW QUESTION 8: Photographing Horses Jumping Fences
    Please advise: I would like the best image of horses jumping fences at shows. Which Nikon camera is best for action shots? The D2H is 8F/sec, the D70 is 3F/sec. Is this burst rate? Shutter speeds seem to be the same for all three models. Cost is not an issue, within reason: $3,000 max. Autofocus seems to be a necessity.
    - Thomas C. Rowe

    ANSWER 1:
    Autofocus doesn't have to be a necessity, especially for something like horse shows. Prefocus on the jumps, and timing will get you through depending on burst rate, which is what the 8 frames/sec is. You'll need to consider which lens you're going to buy just as much as camera body. So don't use all your budget just on the body.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9308

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9308

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    NEW QUESTION 9: Black and White from Color Film?
    First of all, thanks to everyone who contributes to the many questions. My question: I have been asked to provide some outdoor black and white shots for interior design, approximately 20 x 30 size, using medium format (6x4.5 or 6x7). I've always shot color, and my lab says to continue and they will process in B/W. I will practice this weekend, but have never looked at any subject and "imagined" B/W. Any suggestions/tips, etc.?
    - Mike Johansen

    ANSWER 1:
    In general, for shooting B/W, I've always looked for things like shape and texture to make the images interesting - or even certain kinds of lighting. Don't look for vivid color to make the image appealing to look at.
    - Jordan

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9303

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    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9303

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    NEW QUESTION 10: Digital Vs. Film: The Facts of Life :)
    I have my own answer, but I'd like to see what professionals say. Is the best digital equipment capable of taking the high quality photos of a conventional camera? I think not; films have had 100 years of improvement; digital imaging is in its infancy. My Nikon Coolpix (good, cheap camera) doesn't take the photos I can take with a disposable camera. But, then, I have never had a high- quality digital camera, whereas I had a Russian Leika, extremely cumbersome, but excellent camera; I also had another Russian camera; I have forgotten its name, but it was also excellent ... and cumbersome. My brother has an ancient Nikon (from the '70s), and I still cannot compete with him, especially in b/w.< Of course, none of us are pros; he's a shrink and I'm an English & Sp, professor. We play "by ear".
    - Blanca Acosta

    ANSWER 1:
    Blanca, I agree with you that digital is not quite there yet to meet with film cameras, but I believe that it is getting pretty close. Look at my gallery: All of the photos in it have been taken with my digital camera.
    - Andrea L. Akin

    See Andrea's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Yes, it can - just maybe not with what you have.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    I also agree that the high-end digitals can rival the detail and clarity of their film counterparts ... but only to a degree. For Web use ... absolutely. Looking at some of the images here and on other sites, the technical quality of digital cameras over film really shows ... especially with those equipped with high-quality lenses. For printing, though, I would have to give an edge to the fine-grain films over digital for overall sharpness and clarity ... but that's just me.
    One aspect of film that's often overlooked is the variety of different "flavors" of films available. Such as: .Fuji Velvia for the vibrant colors of fall scenics. Kodak Portra for natural skin tones. Etc. These interpretations of color nuances can be either subtle and dramatic, and can vary greatly, dependant upon the photographer's choice of brand or film type. I personally shoot for possible publication ... but also for fun ... and since most of the editors with whom I correspond still prefer film transparencies, I'll keep using them. Later on, who knows?
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 4:
    Hi All,
    Look here:http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/1ds/1ds-field.shtml
    A long review, but worth it, make sure you read it all to get the full picture (so to speak).
    Regards<
    Del
    - Derek Holyhead

    ANSWER 5:
    I have tested over a dozen digital SLR cameras, including the new Nikon D70. Are the images as good as those made with film? Depends.
    1) How good are your film images? Do you use the highest quality films and serious shooting techniques?
    2) How large a print do you need? An 8x12 print from film or a digital file should be superb!
    3) If you make 16x24 prints from your best 35mm negatives, they will probably be better in some respects. BUT ... that's assuming you are using a pro lab or a lab that prints from a high resolution drum scan. A lot of labs cannot make decent prints that large from a 35mm negative.
    4) A print from a digital capture looks different than a print from film. For one thing, there is no grain. Many viewers prefer the print from a digital image when done well.
    The switch to digital SLR cameras is moving at an incredible pace - among serious photo enthusiasts and professional photographers. One reason is the superior image quality produced by today's digital cameras, plus improved speed, autofocus performance, etc. The best images made with a Nikon D70 (for example) make stunning 11x15 prints. (Of course, you need a large format printer or a lab that makes large prints from digital files.) Even a 13x19 print looks great when viewed from a typical distance of 6 feet.
    I switched to digital a couple of years ago and am happy with the quality of my images. Many stock agencies (photo libraries marketing images for publication) now accept images made with 6 megapixel SLR cameras - because their clients are happy with the image quality ... for most applications ... not necessarily for billboard use. (Of course, most huge reproductions are not made from 35mm film, either.) For advertising use, the agencies generally demand that the images be made with an 11+ megapixel camera, like the EOS 1Ds. ($8000.) The larger files allow for much larger reproduction. (Just as they prefer medium format film images for such use.)
    So, the bottom line: Yes, digital capture is as good or better in some respects, although film can still make larger prints of superior quality (than a 6 MP camera) - if using pro-caliber methods for scanning and print making. Most mass market photofinishers will not be able to match that level of quality in a large print. Cheers!
    - Peter K. Burian

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9284

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    NEW QUESTION 11: Surfing Photography
    Hello all! I'm a teenage surfing fanatic, and I love photography. I am always out surfing and wonder how good people would look on film ... My question is: What is the best array of lenses to have for taking photos of surfing and waves from the beach - a distance of about ... 300m?? I use a Canon AE-1 program (FD system). Any help with equipment needs would be great! Cheers.
    - Alon Dekel

    ANSWER 1:
    Alon: If shooting from the beach, you might need a 600mm lens, and those are super-expensive. If your subjects are quite close, a 300mm lens - still expensive, although you might find a good 100-300mm zoom (in a Canon FD mount) on e-bay. The Tamron or Canon brands are fine. Cheers!
    - Peter K. Burian

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9282

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    NEW QUESTION 12: Help With Outside Shots!
    Thanks to anyone who can help me! I am having a problem understanding why my photos that I take outside on a nice partly cloudy day with b/w 100 ISO seem to come out so white. Like an extreme amount of light got to the film. But I don't think that is the problem with 100 speed film. Although I did use auto settings. My shots inside come out wonderful using 550ez flash and some lights. Can anyone help? The film is T-Max 100 on a Canon Rebel G. Thanks.
    - Candy Snyder

    See Candy's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    Candy: Make sure the camera is set to ISO 100. Set the Program mode or one of the subject-specific Programs. Make sure the camera is set for evaluative metering. Go out and shoot; try not to include a lot of bright sky, water or sand. The light meter should produce perfect (or close to it) exposures. You can also use AV mode and select an aperture, such as f/8. The camera will set the right shutter speed. Unless your film lab screws up, it's difficult to get a poorly exposed photo.
    - Peter K. Burian

    ANSWER 2:
    With b/w film, a bright blue sky is not going to contrast much with the clouds. Typical fixes are yellow or red filters to darken the sky, or a polarizer.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9281

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    NEW QUESTION 13: Studio Shooting Snag
    I took some senior pictures in my home studio yesterday and used a west window around 6:30 p.m. or 7:00 p.m. The light was still bright, and I also used a spotlight with a 65watt bulb covered with ripstop nylon and with a black backdrop on the wall. My model was at least 4 ft. away from the backdrop. I used a reflector to put some light on the model's face, but when I got the pictures back today, some were too BRIGHT and some were too DARK, I didn't use the flash on my camera. Can anyone tell me what I might have done wrong? Thank you.
    - Linda Jo Cupps

    See Linda's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    What might have gone wrong is the auto exposure being thrown off by the clothes the people were wearing. Or if you were shooting on manual, the sun went behind the clouds and you kept using the same camera settings.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
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    NEW QUESTION 14: How to Shoot Night Pictures
    I've always wanted to know how to shoot pictures at night, but I really don't know what to do. I would appreciate if you'd let me know. Thank you.
    - Susan L. Cotter

    ANSWER 1:
    It is just like taking normal pictures - except that it requires a longer exposure. You will need a tripod, a camera that can do long exposures, and a shutter release (mechanical, electrical or wireless; you may not need the shutter release if your camera has a self-timer). Some of the automatic-everything point and shoot cameras may not be able to do a long exposure. Let us know what kind of camera (brand and model) that you have, and we can go from there. Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9266

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: How to Avoid Glare in Eyeglasses
    Using a flash with a large group of people, I always get some glare on their glasses.
    - Beth

    ANSWER 1:
    Hello Beth. Here are a couple of things that I have found for people with glasses, but it is more a case-by-case basis, I think. This won't work for every person.
    1) Sometimes the person with glasses will be willing to pop out the lenses and just have the frames on (not all people are OK with this as they can't see enough to be safe without the lenses, and some glasses you can't do this with).
    2) Have the person with the glasses drop their head just a wee bit, enough to stop the glare (again, this isn't always an option, because you may get shadows or a double chin).
    3) Move your light source. If your flash is not an on-camera flash, you may be able to position it so that the glare is minimal, making retouching easier.
    Either way, I think you will really need to decide on a case-by-case basis; also, it will depend on the type of shooting you are doing. If it is all candid, you will not have a choice, but if it is posed you might be able to use the above suggestions. Good luck.
    - Pamela CM Lammersen

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    ANSWER 2:
    Ask the people with glasses to reach behind their ears and push up on the frame that wraps around the ear. That will force the glass to tilt downward and reduce or stop the glare. It usually isn't noticeable in the photos at all. It accomplishes the same results as having them tilt their heads down.
    - Linda Weekley

    ANSWER 3:
    I agree with Linda. It's easier to have them tilt their glasses than their heads. I learned about it in one of my college classes.
    - Judy M. Sayers

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    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Setting Up Self-Portraits
    How does one get a camera to focus for a self-portrait, without the remote release. I know you have to use the self-timer, but how do you get it to focus at the point where you plan to be? I'm totally lost how it is done with just a self-timer and no remote release
    - Andy

    ANSWER 1:
    If you don't have the ability to manually focus, you can "lock-in" the auto-focus by pointing the camera at something that is the same distance away from the camera where you will be standing. Engage the timer, and press the shutter. The lens will focus on that spot. Then, quickly re-compose and get yourself into position before the timer runs out. Most point-and-shoot cameras will work this way. One thing to keep in mind if using an SLR for self-portraiture. Use a manual exposure setting - or, if using auto-exposure, cover the eyepiece, as stray light can enter through it and throw off your meter.
    - Bob Cammarata

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    ANSWER 2:
    They say God is in the details - and wow, I never thought of this. Thank you for the quick response!
    - Andy

    ANSWER 3:
    Another easy way to pre-focus is to photograph yourself sitting in a chair. Then, it's easy to just use the back of the chair as your focus point ... set the timer ... press the shutter ... and have a seat!
    - Bob Cammarata

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    ANSWER 4:
    I have stuffed bears that I've used to pre-focus for self-portraits.
    - Joan W

    ANSWER 5:
    I did think of the bears, but I thought it would probably not work, because I had never heard it mentioned before! Thank you.
    - Andy

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    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 3: Shooting Moonlit Scenes
    I'm having trouble getting shots of moonlit scenes at night. When I use long exposures to get all of the details of the scene then the moon gets badly overexposed and becomes elongated instead of being round. Any suggestions?
    - Frank Goodin

    ANSWER 1:
    If you're talking about shooting a scene (low light) with the moon in it, then you have to double-expose. What's happening is you're exposing for the scene (not the moon), which requires a long exposure. In that case, the moon will be overexposed (because it's brighter than the scene) and will move while you are exposing the scene. To be successful, shoot the scene in low light at whatever you come up with for the correct exposure. Do not include the moon. Also, when you compose the scene, leave some blank space in the sky where you want to place the moon. Now, set your camera to double-expose. Get the moon into your scene where you left the blank space. Now, expose for the moon and shoot. Good luck.
    - Terry L. Long

    ANSWER 2:
    Terry has the right idea with a double exposure, but I believe when you do a double exposure you have to reduce each exposure by ONE stop in the case of two exposures. The degree to which you reduce the exposure increases proportionally with the number of multiple exposures you make.
    - Jeff Grove

    ANSWER 3:
    Doing a moon and night scene double exposure you don't have to do that because you don't have an overlap of exposed scenes. The moon is put in a part of the frame that really hasn't been exposed - or has been exposed very little. But if it's overlapping images, then you should reduce exposure, half of however many images. 2 images, one stop. 3 images, 1 and 1/2. 4 images, 2 stops.
    - Gregory La Grange

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    ANSWER 4:
    When exposing for the moon you have to remember it is an object lit by full sunlight, so basically the "sunny f/16 rule" applies. Also it moves rather fast in the sky; any exposure longer than one second and it will start to streak accross your frame giving you the "elongated instead of round" problem.
    - Robert L. Bradshaw

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