BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, April 26, 2004
~~~~~~~~~~~

* SPOTLIGHT: Showcase Your Photography on the Web
* BETTERPHOTO: Architectural Photography: Focusing on the Details
* FEATURED GALLERY: A Recipe for Innovative Photography
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Picturing Sgt. Peppers / Part-time Photographer
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Spicing Up Scenes With Black and White
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: What Digital Camera to Buy?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: What Type of Macro Lens?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Sunset Drama: Bird in Flight
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: How to Shoot Indoors Without Shadows?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: White Card and Bouncing Light
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Backgrounds for Shooting Flowers
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Filters: To Stack Or Not to Stack
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: The Ins and Outs of Tele-Converters
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Does Softer Light Equal Less Sharpness?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Shelf Life of Smart-Media, Compact Flash Cards
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: How to Avoid Glare in Eyeglasses
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Shooting Photos of Fireworks
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: First Wedding ... How It Turned Out
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: How to Number a Series of Prints?
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Studio Lighting for Digital Photography
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 3: Shooting Moonlit Scenes


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Showcase Your Photography on the Web
With a Deluxe BetterPholio™ by BetterPhoto.com, you can display up to 1000 of your favorite images in a portfolio gallery. Deluxe BetterPholios™ let you choose the look and feel of your own site from a selection of unique, high-quality designs. Best yet, BetterPhoto takes care of the technical hassles for you. In fact, at BetterPhoto, you get the complete package - Web site design, Web hosting, and domain name registration - for one bargain price. Learn the details at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/deluxeWebsites.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to the 157th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

We are going to keep this SnapShot just a little bit shorter and sweeter than usual, focusing first on shooting such dynamic subjects as doors, windows, and food. For details, see the Architectural Photography article and the Featured Gallery below. Next, don't miss Photo Trivia and Photo Tip - the latter an appreciation of how black and white can open up a world of magic and fun.

Lastly, be sure to read the excellent Q&A we have this week. Enjoy browsing the questions - you can learn about everything from macro lenses to flower backgrounds to shooting fireworks to avoiding glare in eyeglasses. Feel free to jump in at any time - we would love to hear your thoughts on any of these topics.

Enjoy ... and happy shooting!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Architectural Photography: Focusing on the Details
Shooting buildings means more than simply capturing big shots of grand structures. Sometimes smaller scenes that focus on photogenic doors, interesting windows, or decorative trim can tell more about a subject than the full-size view - as many BetterPhoto photographers have proved. Instructor Kerry Drager offers some shooting tips and thoughts in his article, "Opening Up Door and Window Options." To read it, go to:
http://www.betterphoto.com/article.asp?id=13

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
FEATURED GALLERY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


A Recipe for Innovative Photography
For many photographers at BetterPhoto.com, an indoor kitchen or an outdoor market can be a hotbed of creativity. And the food photo possibilities are almost endless: from shots of still life scenes to graphic design images that rely on pattern, form, shape, or repetition. In some cases, a person can serve as a "prop" to add a human element. For shooting ideas and inspiration, check out BetterPhoto's "Food Images" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=38

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Last week, we asked:
Who photographed the Beatles' Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Rumiana Koynova-Tenchova is:
The cover of the Beatles' Sgt. Peppers was staged by Peter Blake and Jann Haworth, and photographed by Michael Cooper at Chelsea Manor Studios in London, on March 30, 1967. It is unique, containing cardboard 86 cut-outs depicting images of famous people, wax models of Paul, John, George and Ringo, and other objects such as a velvet snake, television, stone figures, and more. The wax figures of the Beatles were courtesy of Madame Tussauds.

See Rumiana's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=53907

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Part-time Photographer - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

In the movie Mad Dog and Glory, Robert De Niro plays a mild-mannered man with an interest in photography; what does he do for a living?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Spicing Up Scenes With Black and White
Since the first film was shot and developed, black and white has been a favorite choice among top photographers. Why is it that this medium is preferred by so many fine artists and masters of the trade? BetterPhoto's Jim Miotke explains:

It's classic and elegant, even romantic and special. The simplicity of black and white helps you focus on the important stuff. You can often turn a drab color shot into an amazing black and white. If you do your own darkroom work - traditional or digital - it opens up a world of magic and fun. Here's more:

  • Read Jim's article, "The Merits of Black and White Photography," at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/bnw.asp
  • See BetterPhoto's gallery, "Black and White Photography," at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=55


  • Top Ten Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

    All Tips:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

    Add Your Own Tip:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISEMENT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
    My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:
    • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
    • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
    • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
    You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

    BetterPhoto.com
    P.O. Box 2781
    Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

    To order online, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    NEW QUESTION 1: What Digital Camera to Buy?
    I would like to explore the art of taking beautiful and meaningful pictures, but I don't know what digital camera to choose. Unfortunately, I don't have a lot of funds for this endeavor until I graduate, but in the meantime I would like to do it. I would like to get a camera that I can use in my daily life just for taking pictures like the average person, BUT also I would like to use it for my artistic photography, close-ups of objects, people, nature. And the problem is that I would like to take those pictures and enlarge them so I can frame them around my apartment. My budget is about $300.00. What would you recommend? Also, once I am able to afford more, what camera should I get then, so if I enlarge my picture to say 40X14 (sorry about the numbers ... I know the ratio must be wrong, but I just took a ruler) they will look good and nice. If this can only be done with film, then what would you recommend?
    - Leon

    ANSWER 1:
    This is purely my opinion ... Based on what I've seen, I think you really can't go wrong with any Canon, Nikon, or Sony camera. I've seen good pictures taken with the other major brands (Olympus, etc.) as well. With $300.00, you can buy a good digital camera that should last you a year or two at least. (By "last," I mean that you can learn on it for a year or two.) I'd recommend a camera that's at least 3 megapixels and has modes where you can control the aperture and shutter speed. You'll be able to learn a lot on that.
    Here's my story: I'm definitely no pro now, but I started out on a Canon S30 ... 3.2 megapixels and a lot of options for controls. I learned the basics of camera functions on it and how to compose pics and such. The resolution was good enough to make 8"x10"s and take contest-quality photos. I now use a Canon Digital Rebel, which is a digital SLR. It's great because you can change lenses and have total control.
    When you get enough money, I'd recommend getting an SLR. I wouldn't recommend it yet if you don't know a lot about camera control, but once you've learned a bit, you'll almost need it. (:
    - Nancy Grace Chen

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9243

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9243

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 2: What Type of Macro Lens?
    Hello, I need some advice. I want to buy both a ultra zoom lens (70-300) and a macro lens (100). But as I scan through mags and check Web sites I find that some ultra zooms have a macro feature. So should I kill two birds with one stone and get the zoom with the macro feature, or get the macro by itself and the zoom separately?
    - Rainer Quesada

    ANSWER 1:
    When comparing the macro features of those zooms, pay particular attention to the life-size ratios that they claim to achieve. Many zooms in "macro" will only close-focus to 1/4 or 1/6 life-size. If you plan to to do a lot of close-up work, you would be wise to get a true macro lens, which will give you 1:1 (or life-size) reproduction. It's also a good idea to get one with a wide maximum aperture (like 2.8), to allow for more working light when shooting close, and offer the possibility of later adding extension tubes to permit focusing beyond the lens' normal limits if you want.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9242

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9242

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 3: Sunset Drama: Bird in Flight
    How do you photograph a flying bird against a sunset?
    - Prasobh P. Rajan

    ANSWER 1:
    Meter for the sky in the background (a portion of the sky not exposed to the direct rays of the sun). This will render your sunset close to how it appeared to the naked eye, and will show the bird in silhouette. Shutter speeds will vary depending on the species. Soaring birds - like herons, eagles, or vultures - can be frozen at 1/60 or 1/125 sec, while a much faster speed of 1/500 sec. is required to attain feather detail in beating wings. Take a lot of frames to get the best shot possible. Also, wings look better on the up beat, than down.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9237

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9237

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 4: How to Shoot Indoors Without Shadows?
    I set up a studio in one of my one-time bedrooms - it is completely empty now except for photography equipment. However, I get shadows when I am taking a portrait of someone! The room has a west window, and when I am not using it for lighting, I use spot lights. But they ALL leave shadows. What am I doing WRONG??? HELP...
    - Linda Jo Cupps

    See Linda's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    Hello Linda. Where are the shadows? If you mean the shadows are on your subject then, you have to move your lights around to eliminate them. If the shadows are on the background, then you need to "back fill" the background to do away with them. Also, you could move your subject further away from the background to get rid of the shadows. Also, you might want to try a "diffused" lighting system to light your subject. Use an umbrella as a bounce or shoot through the umbrella. Maybe, you might want to look into a "softbox". Good luck.
    - Terry L. Long

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9235

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9235

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 5: White Card and Bouncing Light
    Why do some news photographers put a small white card in the top of a flash gun and the flash gun is slightly tilted upward?
    - vikas shivanker

    ANSWER 1:
    The white card reflects some of the light forward. It provides better fill, especially on the face/eye sockets than simply bouncing from the ceiling.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9231

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9231

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 6: Backgrounds for Shooting Flowers
    I like to take macro pictures of flowers and was wondering what was the best background to use. I want it to be plain, but I'm not opposed to solid colors (i.e., black, white, blue, etc.). I've tried with material, but many times the weaving on the fabric shows up (instead of a blurred solid color). I'm focusing on the flower before shooting. I'd appreciate any suggestions you may have! Thanks.
    - Diane L. Dupuis-Kallos

    See Diane's Premium BetterPholio™

    See Sample Photo - sample re: material backdrop:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=366909

    See Sample Photo - sample re: material backdrop:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=366908

    ANSWER 1:
    Generally, a dark background looks better with a brightly colored flower. If you use material, get more distance between the flower and the background and use a wide aperture setting. This will help to place your background nicely out of focus.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Thanks, Bob, for the advice. Unfortunately, I cannot change the aperture on my Finepix 2600. But I will work on more distance. Does anyone have suggestions as to what to use to hold the flower in the right position so you can have your both hands free?
    - Diane L. Dupuis-Kallos

    See Diane's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    Go to a local craft store and get some of those thin metal flower rods and a block of styrofoam. The rods will usually slide up into the stems of most flowers. If not, you can use twist-ties to secure them. Once you've attached the rods, stick them into the foam and position the flowers however you like. You can also, of course, display them in a narrow, decorative vase.
    - Bob Cammarata

    Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9224

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9224

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 7: Filters: To Stack Or Not to Stack
    Is it wise to stack a circular polarizing filter and a skylight filter on my lens, or should I use them individually? If it's okay, what order should I stack them?
    - Angel M. Alicea

    ANSWER 1:
    Hi Angel. It's not normally advisable to stack filters. You tend to get vignetting (darkening at the corners) caused by the lens actually seeing the edge of the second filter. That said, if you have a digital SLR with a smaller sensor than 35mm you may get away with it. The order in which you stack the filters should make little difference. Cheers.
    - Dave Cross

    ANSWER 2:
    Vignetting with stacked filters will be more likely with wide angle lenses than telephotos. Stacked filters increase the risk of flare from the additional glass surfaces. Using a warming filter (skylight, 81-series, etc.) along with a polarizer is popular enough that some makers make a combined them into a single "warming polarizer" filter.
    Hoya has a combined UV-Polarizer (see http://www.thkphoto.com/products/hoya/gf-05.html).
    Tiffen makes a Warm Polarizer utilizing their 812 warming filter (http://www.tiffen.com/Filter_&_Lens_Brochure/BFILT_06_07.htm).
    Schneider B+W make a Warm Tone Polarizer combining Skylight filter (http://www.schneideroptics.com/filters/filters_for_still_photography/polarizers/).
    The so-called "Moose Filter," made by Hoya to Moose Peterson's specs, combines a polarizer with 81a warming filter (http://www.moose395.net/gear/moosefltr.html).
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9219

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9219

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 8: The Ins and Outs of Tele-Converters
    I own a Minolta 404si SLR camera and have just purchased an AF 75-300 lens. I would love to have a 100-400 but these are very expensive. What are telephoto converters and how good are they? I mainly want to be able to zoom right in on sporting games. I have very limited knowledge regarding lenses and would love and appreciate any advice I can get!
    - Robynne

    ANSWER 1:
    Tele-converters double the focal length by acting like a magnifying glass between the lens and your camera body. And essentially that's what they do: They magnify the central part of the image. So the up side is it's a cheaper way to get a longer focal length, but the down side is that the usable maximum f/stop is reduced depending on how much the converter increases the focal length. And depending on the quality of the converter, you do get a decrease in contrast, and sharpness. How noticeable depends on the converter and the lens you're starting with.
    Your lens is probably a f/5.6, so if you were to add a 2x converter, the image you'd get would be like you were using a 150-600 zoom lens. But your biggest effective f/stop would be f/11. And you'd also have a darker view finder, so you wouldn't be able to shoot at night with that. And image quality may suffer with a 75-300 connected with a converter - well, at least a 2x. The higher the conversion, the greater the contrast and sharpness suffers. You also wouldn't be able to use autofocus, if you do use it.
    I don't know if anybody has a converter to fit that lens. Some manufacturers, their converters only fit some of their lenses. But there are also 1.5 converters, or close to it, like 1.4. With that, you don't get the magnification of a 2x, but you don't get the loss of 2 f/stops. You only lose 1, so the effective aperture would be f/8.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9202

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9202

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 9: Does Softer Light Equal Less Sharpness?
    I have started using studio slave flash with a translucent white umbrella. I don't use a flash meter, I calculate my aperture by using guide # (use half GN power due to the umbrella reflection) film, ISO and distance. I have noticed a difference in sharpness in my images and they seem grainy. Is that due to the lack of perceived contrast? Am I underexposing? Do I really need to get real and get a flash meter? Should I use a better film than I have been using with great results (Superia 400)? Is it my lens that I have also been getting great results with (28-80 Canon II)? I am really committed to getting this right. ANY ADVICE will be appreciated and used.
    - Robert M. Dutton

    ANSWER 1:
    Graininess is most often due to underexposure. The umbrella spreads the light wide and does not reflect 100 percent. It may be eating more than 1/2 flash power you're using in the calculation. Yes, if you are not using TTL or auto flash control then you should have a flash meter to get the right exposure.
    Apologies if you know and are applying these:
    (a) The flash bounced in the umbrella must be set in manual full power mode. If it is auto mode, it will read the bright reflection of the umbrella and not deliver full power.
    (b) The distance in the GN exposure calculation is flash-to-subject and not camera-to-subject.
    - Jon Close

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9197

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9197

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 10: Shelf Life of Smart-Media, Compact Flash Cards
    Is there a shelf life of Compact Flash or Smart-Media cards? How many times can I use these cards before they lose "memory," or do they? I always re-format before using, but can they become degraded like VCR tapes? Thank you for your time.
    - Brinn MacDougall

    See Brinn's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 1:
    I don't know of any shelf life. They are not like tapes ... audio/video tapes and hard drives are all magnetic and require some type of movement (motor) to read/write. Flash memory involves chips with no moving parts.
    - Chris L. Hurtt

    See Chris's Premium BetterPholio™

    Visit CLHurttPhoto.com - Chris's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Hi Brinn. Flash memory does not have a "shelf life" as such (actually it does, but it's reckoned to be 100 years plus). Flash DOES have a rewrite life, I think it's in the region of 5,000 cycles (depends on a lot of factors), but even when this is exceeded it doesn't just "stop working," and the error correction system will mask these failures for a long time. Quick answer: Don't worry, and yes, re-format every time you empty your card :-)
    WARNING. These figures do NOT apply to the "Microdrive" technology; these are real mechanical drives with much shorter life. Cheers.
    - Dave Cross

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9196

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9196

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 11: How to Avoid Glare in Eyeglasses
    Using a flash with a large group of people, I always get some glare on their glasses.
    - Beth

    ANSWER 1:
    Hello Beth. Here are a couple of things that I have found for people with glasses, but it is more a case-by-case basis, I think. This won't work for every person.
    1) Sometimes the person with glasses will be willing to pop out the lenses and just have the frames on (not all people are OK with this as they can't see enough to be safe without the lenses, and some glasses you can't do this with).
    2) Have the person with the glasses drop their head just a wee bit, enough to stop the glare (again, this isn't always an option, because you may get shadows or a double chin).
    3) Move your light source. If your flash is not an on-camera flash, you may be able to position it so that the glare is minimal, making retouching easier.
    Either way, I think you will really need to decide on a case-by-case basis; also, it will depend on the type of shooting you are doing. If it is all candid, you will not have a choice, but if it is posed you might be able to use the above suggestions. Good luck.
    - Pamela CM Lammersen

    Visit pcmlphotography.com - Pamela's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9195

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9195

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 12: Shooting Photos of Fireworks
    I have a Canon Powershot S45 digital camera. What is the best setting for fireworks photos? Auto does not work very well.
    - Paul O. Mayo

    ANSWER 1:
    Set your camera to shooting mode "M" (manual) or "Tv" (shutter speed priority) and use 1, 2 or 4 seconds. See what the result looks like and adjust the speed accordingly. Hope this helps.
    - Andy Szeto

    ANSWER 2:
    You will, of course, need to use a tripod :-)
    - Dave Cross

    ANSWER 3:
    Without touching the camera, you can use a hat to cover the front of the lens in between bursts.
    - Cathy I. Barrows

    See Cathy's Premium BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9191

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9191

    back to top


    *****


    NEW QUESTION 13: First Wedding ... How It Turned Out
    I posted a question a while back on any tips for my first wedding as a photographer, and I would just like to thank everyone who answered and gave me tips. The one that I will most value was the one, "DON'T DO IT" ;-) ... It is a stressing job, but I think I would do it again. So, again thanks for the help.
    - Benjamin Baron

    ANSWER 1:
    To see Benjamin's original question and many of the excellent answers from BetterPhoto members, check out "Continuing Question 2: I Have a Wedding Assignment: What Now?" (SnapShot #153) at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/snapshots/_040330.asp#CONQNA2
    - Jim at BetterPhoto.com

    See Jim Miotke's Premium BetterPholio™
    Visit Jim Miotke's Deluxe BetterPholio™ - Miotke.com

    Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Jim Miotke:
    Jim Miotke's Online Photography Classes

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9182

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9182

    back to top

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CONTINUING QUESTION 1: How to Number a Series of Prints?
    I am about to sell several digital photographs. I have been told they are quite good. I intend to sell more than 1 print of each, but cannot find any info regarding the numbering of prints - i.e., 3/250. Is there a formula, or a book for this? Does the value increase or decrease with this system? Thanks,
    - Sutra R. Robinson

    ANSWER 1:
    Simple enough. You decide how many you want to print, and work towards that total - incrementally numbering up, i.e., 1/250, 2/250, 3/250, etc. This was mainly done with block prints, as the more prints pressed from the block, the more the block would deteriorate - so the lower numbers had more value than the higher ones.
    - Damian Gadal

    Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 2:
    Thanks, Damian. All of my prints are digital. Also, is there a higher value on the print if the maximum number of prints is lower - i.e., 1/50, rather than 1/250 - or is this series numbering necessary at all? I am wondering if digital prints have a different value than film. Thanks.
    - Sutra R. Robinson

    ANSWER 3:
    You can limit them if you want, and the number you print would be up to you. That would also mean no additional prints after the top number. Some people like that; to me, I don't see the point in doing it.
    - Damian Gadal

    Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 4:
    Thanks again. Are you a digital photographer? Is there a difference in value between digital and film photos for sale? I have gotten mixed feedback on this question. Thanks.
    - Sutra R. Robinson

    ANSWER 5:
    If your prints should somehow become a collector's item someday, the lower number will probably work towards a slightly higher value.
    - Scott

    ANSWER 6:
    Sutra, normally "art" photographers do printings of 25 to a few hundred, oftentimes in two or three sizes (each size having its own number of prints: i.e. 8x10 50 copies, 11x14 50 copies, 16x20 50 copies). If you're selling your prints at $1000 a copy, the series tends have fewer copies. In terms of pricing, as the series gets close to selling out, the prints are priced higher. In terms of collector value, the lower numbered prints (especially the ones in the single digits) have more value. Since you're just starting out, I'd set the limit fairly high. As for value, black and white prints have been the most highly sought after, then color prints, and finally digital. However, this is changing as digital papers and inks become more archival. Good luck on your project. Would you mind loading a few of the photos into the thread so we can see what you're selling?
    - Robert Brown

    Visit robertobrownphotography.com - Robert's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 7:
    Thanks for all the feedback on this question. And Robert, thanks for the response ... just what I was needing, as far as fine art and collector values regarding digital. I have all archival inks and papers. I will load a few photographs as soon as I learn how to do it.
    - Sutra R. Robinson

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9145

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9145

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Studio Lighting for Digital Photography
    I have a Canon Digital Rebel. I am using the Canon Speedlite to trigger the tripod-mounted studio flash and soft box. I have gone through the whole range of aperture settings on the lens in the full auto mode as well as in all the program modes on the camera. All I get is white. I have also tried all options for the AWB setting on the camera. When I do the same using only the Speedlite, the results are acceptable, considering it is a camera-mounted flash. What am I doing wrong?
    - Youhan

    ANSWER 1:
    Like other digital SLR systems, the dedicated speedlight for the Digital Rebel uses a low-power pre-flash while the shutter is still closed and mirror down for the evaluative meter to read and set the flash exposure. Digital cameras are not capable of TTL flash exposure. I'm guessing your studio lights are triggered with an optical slave that is firing them with the shutter-closed pre-flash instead of during the shutter-open main flash. To get around this, you'll need to either connect the studio lights directly with PC sync cords and a PC/hot shoe adaptor, or use a non-dedicated flash in the hot shoe (such as a Vivitar 283) to trigger the optical slaves.
    - Jon Close

    ANSWER 2:
    You're overexposing with the soft box. You need to get off auto and program modes because your camera is just going to determine exposure for your single dedicated flash, and the soft box just adds too much extra light. Use manual, and go through the apertures to find which one is the best with the soft box. If the soft box were going off from a pre-flash, I don't think they would recycle in time to shoot again when the shutter opened. If that were happening I would think the pictures would be dark. I would also think that them going off with an exposure determining pre-flash would throw off the exposure because of the extra light, making them dark.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 3:
    The photos are definitely overexposed. We just have to figure out why. ... It sounds like the camera is setting the exposure based on the speedlight and not being adjusted for the studio flash. Are you sure it is set for wireless transmission to only trigger the studio lights and not actually being used as the main flash? Are you using a flash meter? What I recommend for foolproof exposure is to use a flash meter for the exposure, set the camera on manual mode, and make sure the speedlight is only triggering the studio lights. I also recommend, like Jon C., to use a PC cord and hot shoe adapter which are very cheap. If you use these, plus a flash meter, and are setting the camera manually, you can't go wrong. Good luck!
    - Leah Marshall

    See Leah's Premium BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 4:
    I also have a Digital Rebel and I had the same problem about two weeks ago. To resolve my problem, I purchased a safe sync. It's by Wein and it's called Safe Sync Hot Shoe Voltage Regulator. It's about $50 ($49.95 at www.bhphotovideo.com). This will help save your camera by keeping the voltage from the lights away from your camera.
    - Keana Clay

    ANSWER 5:
    If you were doing the same thing as Youhan, it sounds like all that you did was put an attachment between the flash and the camera, which made it no longer able to read the flash as dedicated. I think you could have done the same thing by switching to manual mode.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    ANSWER 6:
    I also have a Digital Rebel and I had the same problem. What I did was purchase a PC Cord and PC Adaptor and use the full manual control (1/60 and F5.6 to F8.0). Great pictures.
    - Bobby W. Curry

    ANSWER 7:
    I apologize, I left something out. I am not using a Speedlite to trigger my strobes, I am using a PC cord. That cord is attached to the safe sync. When I was using the Speedlite (in manual mode) to trigger the strobes, everything was too dark. I wasn't capturing the flash from the strobe, just the flash from the Speedlite. I should have made that clear with my first response.
    - Keana Clay

    ANSWER 8:
    Thanks, everybody, for the responses. I tried out the suggestion given by Jon, and it worked. I used an old non- dedicated flash that I had for my Canon AE1-P as a spare flash. It triggered the strobes perfectly and I got perfect pictures. I haven't had the time to go pick out a hot shoe with a sync cord, but I guess that should work as well.
    - Youhan

    ANSWER 9:
    Hi, been there done that. The camera is smart, but in this case you need to do the thinking, go to manual mode, meter your flash.
    - james

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9121

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9121

    back to top

    *****


    CONTINUING QUESTION 3: Shooting Moonlit Scenes
    I'm having trouble getting shots of moonlit scenes at night. When I use long exposures to get all of the details of the scene then the moon gets badly overexposed and becomes elongated instead of being round. Any suggestions?
    - Frank Goodin

    ANSWER 1:
    If you're talking about shooting a scene (low light) with the moon in it, then you have to double-expose. What's happening is you're exposing for the scene (not the moon), which requires a long exposure. In that case, the moon will be overexposed (because it's brighter than the scene) and will move while you are exposing the scene. To be successful, shoot the scene in low light at whatever you come up with for the correct exposure. Do not include the moon. Also, when you compose the scene, leave some blank space in the sky where you want to place the moon. Now, set your camera to double-expose. Get the moon into your scene where you left the blank space. Now, expose for the moon and shoot. Good luck.
    - Terry L. Long

    ANSWER 2:
    Terry has the right idea with a double exposure, but I believe when you do a double exposure you have to reduce each exposure by ONE stop in the case of two exposures. The degree to which you reduce the exposure increases proportionally with the number of multiple exposures you make.
    - Jeff Grove

    ANSWER 3:
    Doing a moon and night scene double exposure you don't have to do that because you don't have an overlap of exposed scenes. The moon is put in a part of the frame that really hasn't been exposed - or has been exposed very little. But if it's overlapping images, then you should reduce exposure, half of however many images. 2 images, one stop. 3 images, 1 and 1/2. 4 images, 2 stops.
    - Gregory La Grange

    Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

    Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9082

    Answer this question:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9082

    back to top


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ASK YOUR OWN QUESTION ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Ask a question or answer a few from your fellow photographers:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/qnaTOC.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    READ PAST ISSUES OF THE SNAPSHOT NEWSLETTER
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Read previous issues of SnapShot in the BetterPhoto archives:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/snapshots.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    SIGN UP TO PHOTOFLASH AND THE DIGITAL PICTURE
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Join the fun and master the arts of traditional or digital photography! Participate or follow along as we discuss topics & lessons, practice assignments, and offer feedback on each others' work. Subscribe to our other two free newsletters - PhotoFlash and the Digital Darkroom - at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Get word of your product or service out to our rapidly growing list of 29075 subscribers.

    Learn more about advertising in SnapShot at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/g/advertise.asp

    Until next week, happy shooting!

    Thank you,
    Jim Miotke
    BetterPhoto.com

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    If you would rather not receive SnapShot, you may unsubscribe at:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeun.asp?e=

    To change your email address, visit:
    http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeCOA.asp?e=

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Copyright 2005 BetterPhoto.com - All Rights Reserved. No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission.

    Copyright 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.