BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, April 19, 2004
~~~~~~~~~~~

* SPOTLIGHT: Publish Your Own Photography Articles
* BETTERPHOTO: Keeping Horizon Lines on The Level
* BETTERPHOTO: See the March Showcase of Contest Winners
* PHOTO LINK: Featured Gallery: In a Reflective Frame of Mind
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Poetic Ode / Picturing Sgt. Pepper's
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Getting Straight Horizons ... When You Want Them! By Brenda Tharp
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Digital vs. Optical Zoom
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: How to Number a Series of Prints?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: More on Blurring Backgrounds
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Camera Shake on a 200mm or 300mm Lens
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Saving Too Many Times - Quality
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: How to Shoot Animals Through a Fence
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Studio Lighting for Digital Photgraphy
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Setting Up Self-Portraits
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Many of My Pictures Aren't Sharp!
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Photographing Public Gardens
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Let the Scanner Adjust Colours? Or not?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Shooting Moonlit Scenes
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: Studio Portraits - Film, Lab
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Lens Hood vs Lens Filters


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Publish Your Own Photography Articles
BetterPhoto's Deluxe BetterPholios™ offer the ability to publish your own articles. A simple form lets you combine text with photos to create tips pages, stories, helpful how-to pages, and more. You enter the material, and we stitch it all together for you. In a matter of minutes, you see your very own photo-illustrated work on the Web! Order your Deluxe BetterPholio™ today at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/deluxeWebsites.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Welcome to the 156th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

We've had another exciting week at BetterPhoto! The Combo Workshop was a tremendous experience - and a tremendous success. It's hard to top the photography of wildlife, horses, and cowboys amid the beautiful backdrop of California's Sierra foothills. Coming soon: descriptions, tips, anecdotes, and (of course) photos from this adventure.

Also heading the list of photographic events is the posting of some truly awesome images - the winners of the March contest. For more information and a link, see the BetterPhoto Update item below.

Keeping a horizon line level has always been a challenge for landscape photographers. Not surprising, since it's not always easy to see a slanting horizon during all the visual excitement of shooting a great outdoor scene. This week, though, two BetterPhoto instructors check in with their thoughts on the subject. See Kerry Drager's article and Brenda Tharp's Photo Tip - both noted below.

Enjoy this week of photo fun!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Keeping Horizon Lines on The Level
We've all seen - OK, we've all shot! - pictures in which a long, straight horizon line slants in one direction, making it appear as if everything is going to slide right out of the photo. In some cases, such a strong diagonal line can be used to creative advantage. Otherwise, it's best to keep things nice and straight. For advice, check out instructor Kerry Drager's article, "Keeping Horizon Lines On The Level," at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/article.asp?id=5


*****
See the March Showcase of Contest Winners
For photographic inspiration, there's nothing like reviewing fantastic photography. And BetterPhoto's monthly contest has become quite a showcase. But it's also a great learning tool, as well. Besides looking and admiring, check out how light, composition, subject, and other creative techniques turn often-ordinary subjects into eye-catching images. For the March contest, congratulations go to Mike Wehrman for his Grand Prize winning photo, "Bridge with a View," as well as to Bob Jones, Bob Garas, Nancy Chen, Dudy Ardon, and Karen-Jane Dudley for their wonderful First Place prize winning images. Of course, the second-place finishers and the finalists deserve praise, too! View the winning shots at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/contest/winners/0403.asp

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO LINKS
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Featured Gallery: In a Reflective Frame of Mind
It's no wonder that reflections are such a popular subject for BetterPhoto shooters. After all, images on water, glass, and chrome carry quite a visual punch - from mirrored views to impressionistic scenes to artistic abstracts. The trick to shooting them? Keep your eyes open and your camera handy! For ideas and inspiration, don't miss BetterPhoto's "Reflection Pictures" gallery at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=1325

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Last week, we asked:
An English poem describes the process of making a photograph as "mystic, awful" - who is the poet?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Gregory Anzalone is:
"Hiawatha's Photographing" by Lewis Carroll: "From his shoulder Hiawatha Took the camera of rosewood. Made of sliding folding rosewood; Neatly put it all together. ... Pushed and pulled the joints and hinges, Till it looked all squared and oblongs. ... This he perched upon a tripod And the family in order Sat before him for their picture Mystic, awful was the process."

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Picturing Sgt. Pepper's - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

Who photographed the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Getting Straight Horizons ... When You Want Them! By Brenda Tharp
Aside from inserting architectural grid focusing screens (which I love), there are other ways to ensure you get a straight horizon when you want one. How often have you approached the viewfinder from an angle - perhaps because the tripod was low, and it was easier to bend over from the side to look through the camera? If you do this, you will very often end up with a tilted horizon! Unless you look through your viewfinder from a "straight on" approach, you run the risk of tilting.

Here's another method: In my field workshops, people are amazed when I can walk up to their cameras and without looking through them, say that they are tilted. How do I know this? Because "in relationship to the scene" I can see that the camera is not straight. Most of us are so busy looking through the camera that we might not catch a slight tilt, but it's a great way to check things. Just take a step back, look at your scene, and look at your camera - from directly behind - and you'll probably be able to tell whether you're straight or not!

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Taking Great Photos
My new book guides you away from the point-and-pray method of taking pictures to shooting with confidence. In this simple and clear how-to book, you will learn:

  • How to compose your picture with a more artful eye
  • The top qualities that winning photos exhibit
  • Tips and secrets for consistently getting better results... and much more.
You can order this book online, call our toll-free order processing number 1-888-927-9992, or simply send a check or money order for USD $16.90 (or USD$18.90 if shipping to Canada or USD$24.90 to other international addresses) to:

BetterPhoto.com
P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NEW QUESTION 1: Digital vs. Optical Zoom
What is the difference between a digital and optical zoom? I have a Nikon 5700 Coolpix and never even thought about there being a difference (duh...). Thanks for whatever explanation you can give (in everyday speak-ease, please).
- Judy A. Arena

See Judy's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Optical zoom refers to the lens physically changing the focal length. At all zoom settings the lens projects an image on the full digital sensor. Digital zoom crops the image from the center of the sensor and enlarges it. There is less detail in the digital zoom image, since it is created using only a portion of the pixels available on the sensor.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
Optical zoom - zoom made by the lens. This means real zoom. The same happens if you move closer to the subject. Pros: You get a very good image detail. Cons: Depending on the lens quality, you may have aberrations ("mistakes") in the image. It gets flattened, the lines become less straight, etc.
Digital zoom - A re-creation of the image by multiplying PART of its pixels. It is virtual, because the human eye or brain cannot do that. Pros: You don't need super-expensive lenses to do it. Cons: Less detail, loss of reality.
What do I mean? Well, I've argued many times about this; if you digitally zoom a subject, it doesn't change apart from getting enlarged. Think of it this way: Look at something - a flower, for example - and then step 1 meter closer; aren't there other things that change apart from its size? The human eye aberrates, and the lens does that too. Digitally zooming a picture is like looking at THE PRINT through a magnifying glass, while optically zooming an image is like looking at THE SUBJECT through a magnifying glass. This is my opinion, although nobody asked for it ... sorry :)
- Miltos Vasiliadis

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9157

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9157

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 2: How to Number a Series of Prints?
I am about to sell several digital photographs. I have been told they are quite good. I intend to sell more than 1 print of each, but cannot find any info regarding the numbering of prints - i.e., 3/250. Is there a formula, or a book for this? Does the value increase or decrease with this system? Thanks,
- Sutra R. Robinson

ANSWER 1:
Simple enough. You decide how many you want to print, and work towards that total - incrementally numbering up, i.e., 1/250, 2/250, 3/250, etc. This was mainly done with block prints, as the more prints pressed from the block, the more the block would deteriorate - so the lower numbers had more value than the higher ones.
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Thanks, Damian. All of my prints are digital. Also, is there a higher value on the print if the maximum number of prints is lower - i.e., 1/50, rather than 1/250 - or is this series numbering necessary at all? I am wondering if digital prints have a different value than film. Thanks.
- Sutra R. Robinson

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9145

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9145

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 3: More on Blurring Backgrounds
I've read all the ways suggested to blur backgrounds, and they applied to film cameras. With a digital camera, I've tried to blur backgrounds by using the "soft" option of the editing software, but I haven't achieved the results one gets when one focuses on the closest object with a traditional camera.
- Jose Alas

ANSWER 1:
If this is a digital SLR, just do it the same way: with the biggest aperture the lens has.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9144

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9144

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Camera Shake on a 200mm or 300mm Lens
Could anyone tell me at what mm lens do you need to use a tripod? I am looking at purchasing a Canon EF 75-300mm lens or a Canon EF 55-200mm lens. There isn't a lot of price difference. But I don't want to have to use a tripod all the time. I currently use a Canon EF 28-80mm lens and I need more zoom for nature photography. Thanks!
- Carol J. Guernsey

ANSWER 1:
Hi Carol. Yes, I have a 200mm zoom lens and with a bit of testing I proved you can get a steady picture by simply setting the shutter speed to 1/250. As for the 300mm, experiment with the shutter at 1/500 a second.
- Gary W. Tallnash

ANSWER 2:
Hi Carol - A rule of thumb: To avoid camera shake, make sure your shutter speed is 1/length of your lens. For example, if you're shooting your 300mm, you would want a shutter speed of 1/300 or faster. If the lenses have IS or VR technology, this can be stretched a bit. I've also heard of people being able to stretch it a bit by bracing themselves against something sturdy, etc. My experience has proven pretty much in line with the rule as well. Good luck and enjoy your new lens!
- K Stevens

See K's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
It also depends on how heavy the lens is - and how well you hold it. 'With a stationary subject, you can hold it at 1/125 or 1/60.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
I start to get shake below 1/80 with my 300mm.
- Damian Gadal

Visit gadal-imagery.com - Damian's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9138

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9138

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Saving Too Many Times - Quality
I understand saving too many times hurts the quality of the photo. After I load to my PC, I do all of my manipulations of the photo, then save as another file. Then I keep my original. Then I archive both to an external hard drive. Later, if needed, I save to a CD to send out. Is that too much? Is the quality going bad at that point? I shoot and save as TIFFs.
- Barbara R. Taylor

ANSWER 1:
"Lossy" formats, such as JPEG (.jpg) and GIF will compress and lose information with each save from an editing program. There is never any loss if you simply copy the file (using, for example, Windows Explorer or My Computer) without opening it. TIFF format is generally lossless, and there is no compression or lost information with successive saves or copying (though you won't be able to recover the original if you've made any edits and saved them). No file format is immune from faulty media (dirty/bad/corrupted disk or CF card) or faulty writing device.
- Jon Close

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9126

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9126

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 6: How to Shoot Animals Through a Fence
If anyone might see this real soon ... I need to know how to shoot through a chain-link fence (big cats). I will be leaving this morning, so I hope someone sees it soon. :D My guess is you shoot on the open side (so the fence is supposed to disappear)? So far, that is not my experience. Am I too close to the fence? What can I do to have the fence, poof, gone? Thanks ahead of time!!
- She-She Killough

ANSWER 1:
Shoot with the widest aperture the lens has, and get as close to the fence as you can - as in right up to the fence. Moving an inch or two to either side can make the links less noticable if you can get the openings of the fence over the middle of the frame - or over the animal's face. And if you can shoot through a shaded part of the fence, it will be less noticeable. It may never be totally invisible if it's the light gray color. You may only be able to minimize it.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Thanks Gregory! I appreciate your help!! In some cases, I think I minimized it - maybe on one or two I think I might have lost the fence. :D Have to look and see when I pull them up on the pc. I notice you sure help a lot of people. It is always nice to have guys like you around. Thanks so much.
- She-She Killough

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9123

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9123

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Studio Lighting for Digital Photgraphy
I have a Canon Digital Rebel. I am using the Canon Speedlite to trigger the tripod-mounted studio flash and soft box. I have gone through the whole range of aperture settings on the lens in the full auto mode as well as in all the program modes on the camera. All I get is white. I have also tried all options for the AWB setting on the camera. When I do the same using only the Speedlite, the results are acceptable, considering it is a camera-mounted flash. What am I doing wrong?
- Youhan

ANSWER 1:
Like other digital SLR systems, the dedicated speedlight for the Digital Rebel uses a low-power pre-flash while the shutter is still closed and mirror down for the evaluative meter to read and set the flash exposure. Digital cameras are not capable of TTL flash exposure. I'm guessing your studio lights are triggered with an optical slave that is firing them with the shutter-closed pre-flash instead of during the shutter-open main flash. To get around this, you'll need to either connect the studio lights directly with PC sync cords and a PC/hot shoe adaptor, or use a non-dedicated flash in the hot shoe (such as a Vivitar 283) to trigger the optical slaves.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
You're overexposing with the soft box. You need to get off auto and program modes because your camera is just going to determine exposure for your single dedicated flash, and the soft box just adds too much extra light. Use manual, and go through the apertures to find which one is the best with the soft box. If the soft box were going off from a pre-flash, I don't think they would recycle in time to shoot again when the shutter opened. If that were happening I would think the pictures would be dark. I would also think that them going off with an exposure determining pre-flash would throw off the exposure because of the extra light, making them dark.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9121

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9121

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 8: Setting Up Self-Portraits
How does one get a camera to focus for a self-portrait, without the remote release. I know you have to use the self-timer, but how do you get it to focus at the point where you plan to be? I'm totally lost how it is done with just a self-timer and no remote release
- Andy

ANSWER 1:
If you don't have the ability to manually focus, you can "lock-in" the auto-focus by pointing the camera at something that is the same distance away from the camera where you will be standing. Engage the timer, and press the shutter. The lens will focus on that spot. Then, quickly re-compose and get yourself into position before the timer runs out. Most point-and-shoot cameras will work this way. One thing to keep in mind if using an SLR for self-portraiture. Use a manual exposure setting - or, if using auto-exposure, cover the eyepiece, as stray light can enter through it and throw off your meter.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
They say God is in the details - and wow, I never thought of this. Thank you for the quick response!
- Andy

ANSWER 3:
Another easy way to pre-focus is to photograph yourself sitting in a chair. Then, it's easy to just use the back of the chair as your focus point ... set the timer ... press the shutter ... and have a seat!
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9116

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9116

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 9: Many of My Pictures Aren't Sharp!
I use a Canon EOS Digital Rebel with a 28 to 80mm AF lens. A lot of my pics are not sharp My ISO/ASA is 400. My shutter speed is 400, aperture 11. What is wrong?
- RONNIE G. CAMPBELL

See RONNIE's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Could be any of a number of reasons, such as: a) poor focus technique; b) most zoom lenses like the 28-80 are not as sharp at wide apertures (f/3.5-5.6) as they are at f/8 or f/11*; c) too slow a shutter speed that causes blurring from camera shake or from subject movement*; d) higher ISO settings tend to capture less detail and more noise than ISO 100; e) lower resolution JPEG settings capture less detail than RAW; f) underexposure will result in a loss of detail and contrast; g) all of the above are amplified if you make large (bigger than 4"x6") prints or print at less than ~300 dpi. *(b) and *(c) are listed for completeness; they do not necessarily apply in your case since you stated you shot at 1/400 and f/11.
- Jon Close

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9114

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9114

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 10: Photographing Public Gardens
Any suggestions for artistic, creative photos of public gardens in the springtime?
- Paul D. Carter

ANSWER 1:
Hello Paul. The only suggestion I have is for you to grab your camera gear, head to the garden, and go for it. Just experiment and find what you like. A macro is needed, if you want real close-up flower shots. Experiment with your aperture for depth of field, use a tripod, and don't forget those pesky bugs in the garden - they can make fun shots. Let your imagination go wild. If you see a photo in a magazine you like, then tear it out and save it, when you go to the garden try to duplicate it. Watch where the light is coming from and 1/2 the battle is over - that's a good way to learn. It won't be long till the flowers are up in my area - can't wait! Good luck.
- Pamela CM Lammersen

Visit pcmlphotography.com - Pamela's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Get low, and shoot at ground level for a more interesting perspective. As Pam mentioned ... Light is everything! Try different angles to make the most of it.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
I'd go against keeping the magazine photo and duplicating it. That gets in the way of being creative. Everybody gets ideas from looking at other photos. And you can learn about lighting effects from looking at other photos. Somebody had an article in a communication arts annual, and he talked about how what you know can hurt, as far as new ideas. And that many times in advertising new ideas come from people new to trying to market a particular product - like they used to market cars but then have to do sodas. Or they're just totally unfamiliar with being the one to come up with ideas - like somebody outside of marketing who doesn't keep up with what all the other companies are doing. So try not to plan anything and see what the garden tells you. You can always go back.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9111

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9111

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 11: Let the Scanner Adjust Colours? Or not?
Do you best scan your film/prints/slides by letting the scanner adjust the colour or leave it as original and then use PS if necessary? Any help is most welcome.
- Nicole S. McGrade

See Nicole's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Hello Nicole. I always do as much adjustments in the scanner as possible - except using the "Unsharp Masking"! I'm not a professional, so take that into consideration. However, after the scan and once into PS, I save the image first, then I make a duplicate and work on the dupe. That way I've always got an original to work with without having to re-scan. Also, I never let the scanner "automatically" adjust the color. I manually adjust to MY liking. Have fun and good luck.
- Terry L. Long

ANSWER 2:
Hi Terry, Thank you very much, food for thought!
- Nicole S. McGrade

See Nicole's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
A lot will depend upon the quality of the original slide or negative. (You should avoid scanning prints whenever possible.) I will generally use the scanner's factory pre-sets for color, but will sometimes adjust brightness and contrast if it needs it. I learned a great tip here at BP (one of Jim Miotke's tips): Crop out the black borders on the image, and the scanner will do a better job duplicating the original colors. On BP's home page under SAMPLE LESSONS, click on "Scanning and the Unsharp Mask Filter" for other great tips.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9098

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9098

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 12: Shooting Moonlit Scenes
I'm having trouble getting shots of moonlit scenes at night. When I use long exposures to get all of the details of the scene then the moon gets badly overexposed and becomes elongated instead of being round. Any suggestions?
- Frank Goodin

ANSWER 1:
If you're talking about shooting a scene (low light) with the moon in it, then you have to double-expose. What's happening is you're exposing for the scene (not the moon), which requires a long exposure. In that case, the moon will be overexposed (because it's brighter than the scene) and will move while you are exposing the scene. To be successful, shoot the scene in low light at whatever you come up with for the correct exposure. Do not include the moon. Also, when you compose the scene, leave some blank space in the sky where you want to place the moon. Now, set your camera to double-expose. Get the moon into your scene where you left the blank space. Now, expose for the moon and shoot. Good luck.
- Terry L. Long

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9082

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9082

back to top


*****


NEW QUESTION 13: Studio Portraits - Film, Lab
I have been practicing with studio lighting in my home, and I am going to be taking pictures of a friend's child for his yearbook pictures. I am curious as to what type of film would be best for this situation. I usually use Kodak Max 400. Also, does anyone know of a professional photo lab in Macomb County, MI.? I don't know where to take my pictures to get them developed with a professional look. Thanks
- Sarah

ANSWER 1:
I tend to favor Kodak Portra professional brand films for portrait work. Portra produces great skin tones that puts the "wow!" in portrait photos. As for processing, I don't know the area. However, if you have a local Ritz superstore you may want to check them out. I loved the one I went to in South Florida - great professional-looking prints at favorable prices. Otherwise, check out your local business phone book for photo labs in your area. Good luck in your search.
- Raquel Stanton

ANSWER 2:
I've used Illford Delta 400 sp film (black and white) on a 1-year-old and loved the results. I used a black backdrop. My setup included a Canon Eos Rebel G, 75-300 IS, and 550 EX speedlite. Good luck.
- Kristi Seanor

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=9074

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=9074

back to top

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Lens Hood vs Lens Filters
Bet you can't tell I'm a novice by this question!! Does a lens hood negate the need for a lens filter? All I know is that a hood cuts out some glare, yes? Is it useful to use it outside all the time? Use it everywhere all the time? Also, assuming that one would use filters all the time with the hood as well, would I use a polarizing filter all the time outdoors instead of the standard filter that prevents dust and protects the lens. I'm confused and I can't find it in the digital photo books I just got from the library. Thank you!
- Laura J. Smith

ANSWER 1:
Lens hoods and the filters have different purposes - the only overlap is a secondary purpose of protection. A lens hood shields the front element from stray light and bright sources outside the field of view that can cause flare and ghosting. Filters are used for changing the nature of the light entering the lens (adjust color, block certain wavelengths, polarize the rays, etc.) Filters can often contribute to lens flare because they add more reflective surfaces, so it is common to use a lens hood and filter together. A lens hood can/should be used at all times, even indoors. However, depending on its size and the size/location of your flash, it can interfere with the light from a flash, causing shadows. A polarizer should not be used outdoors all the time, only when the situation calls for it - such as when desiring to eliminate reflections on water or in glass windows, or at certain times of the day it can deepen the blue of the sky and saturate colors. It has little or no effect when the light is diffuse on heavy overcast days.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
Jon is right about everything except the use of the polarizer on overcast days. When foliage is damp, the polarizer can eliminate reflections and increase color saturation. Just remember: Whenever you're using a polarizer, turn it slowly until you see the effect you want through the lens. It will also enhance the colors of a rainbow.
- Shirley Cross

See Shirley's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
D'oh! I forgot about using polarizer with rainbows. I stand corrected. Thanks, Shirley.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 4:
I'd only add that many people use a lens adapter with a UV or haze filter, mainly for protecting the lens from dust, dirt, and damage. In this case, it's probably acting more like a hood than a lense.
- David Freed

ANSWER 5:
I use a polarizer for many of my shots and use some type of filter (such as a UV) all the time to protect the glass in my lens. It's cheaper to replace a scratched filter than an entire lens. I also use a lens shade ALL the time to prevent any glare (and it also helps protect the lens). Two tips: First, buy a filter of quality commensurate with the quality of your lens. It is silly to put a two dollar piece of glass in front of an excellent lens and equally silly to pay $50 for a filter to put on a cheapo lens. Secondly, if you desire to use a polarizer and a lens shade, make sure that they are compatible. As an example, the factory Canon lens shade for the 28-135mm IS lens cannot be effectively used with a polarizing filter (this is right out of the lens manual and has to do with being unable to physically rotate the filter with the lens hood attached).
- Richard P. Crowe

ANSWER 6:
Thank you all, this is great info - way more clear than what I've gathered in pieces from reading.
- Laura J. Smith

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=8444

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=8444

back to top


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ASK YOUR OWN QUESTION ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ask a question or answer a few from your fellow photographers:
http://www.betterphoto.com/qnaTOC.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
READ PAST ISSUES OF THE SNAPSHOT NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Read previous issues of SnapShot in the BetterPhoto archives:
http://www.betterphoto.com/snapshots.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
SIGN UP TO PHOTOFLASH AND THE DIGITAL PICTURE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join the fun and master the arts of traditional or digital photography! Participate or follow along as we discuss topics & lessons, practice assignments, and offer feedback on each others' work. Subscribe to our other two free newsletters - PhotoFlash and the Digital Darkroom - at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribe.asp


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN SNAPSHOT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Get word of your product or service out to our rapidly growing list of 28803 subscribers.

Learn more about advertising in SnapShot at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/g/advertise.asp

Until next week, happy shooting!

Thank you,
Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you would rather not receive SnapShot, you may unsubscribe at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeun.asp?e=

To change your email address, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/subscribeCOA.asp?e=

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Copyright 2005 BetterPhoto.com - All Rights Reserved. No part of this newsletter may be copied or published without prior permission.

Copyright 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.