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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Thursday, April 03, 2003
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* SPOTLIGHT: Give the Gift of a Photography Course, Web Site, or Gallery
* BETTERPHOTO: Spring Photo Courses Less Than a Week Away
* BETTERPHOTO: Eight Steps to More Dramatic Photography with Jim Zuckerman
* BETTERPHOTO: Get In-Depth Instruction from Kerry Drager
* PHOTO LINK: Jim Zuckerman's Tips on Photographing Animals
* PHOTO LINK: Check Out Tony Sweet's New DVD!
* PHOTO LINK: New and Improved Photo Marketing Course!!!
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Timeline / Birth of Kodak
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Use Unique Angles
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Sepia Photographs
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Scratch on Focus screen...will it affect my pics?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Black and white photograhy
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: How to Shoot Flowers and Other Plants
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Resolution
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Canon AE-1 Lens Mount
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Lenses for Vivitar SLR using PK Mount
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Taking Pictures of Baby
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Wedding Photography and Developing
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: What is an electronic through-the-lens viewfinder
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Flash problems
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: What Type of Lens to Buy?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 13: Slides Chrome
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Cameras and Airports


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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Give the Gift of a Photography Course, Web Site, or Gallery
BetterPhoto online courses, Premium BetterPholios™, and Deluxe BetterPholios™ are make fantastic gifts for photographers! We have now made an easy way for you to give a gift certificate to that special photographer in your life. A handsome certificate will be mailed to you in a special presentation envelope. To learn more, visit:
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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 110th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Spring is finally approaching and winter is on the way out. Many of us are shouting for joy at the thought of warmer weather and the promise of new photo opportunities.

In just a few days we will be starting the next session of exciting online courses. Tomorrow I will be sending out the instructions and course questionnaires to new students, so if you haven't signed up yet, now is the perfect time.

We are also working on the March contest. A staggering 6400 entries were submitted and we hope to have the finalists chosen in the next several days. Beautiful work as always - stay tuned to see the finalists.

Keep up the great work!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoContact.asp?memberID=124


*****
Spring Photo Courses Less Than a Week Away
The time to sign up for a Spring classes is running out! Enroll today to enjoy benefits such as direct interaction with the instructor/author, weekly lessons and assignments, as well as insightful, constructive critiques. Learn more about a couple of our most popular courses below:

Beginning Photography with Jim Miotke:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JCM01.asp

Understanding Exposure with Bryan F. Peterson:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BFP02.asp

Or select your favorite from all of the courses at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/workshops.asp


*****
Eight Steps to More Dramatic Photography with Jim Zuckerman
Want to learn how to transform your photos from mediocre and unfulfilling to exciting and dramatic? In Jim Zuckerman's course, you will learn that there are definitive things you can do to immediately improve your photography. With eight easy steps, you will improve your ability to create better compositions, use color more effectively, and learn what makes a great subject. Learn more or sign up today at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JZK01.asp

Or, check out Jim's new Mastering Light online course. This eight-week course helps you master both natural light and flash, important parts in any good photographer's work:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JZK02.asp


*****
Get In-Depth Instruction from Kerry Drager
For informative and helpful critiques, in addition to packed lessons and exciting assignments, join Kerry in one of his two online photo courses. In his recent course addition - Field Techniques - you'll learn how to shoot striking silhouettes, add a human touch to your scenics,and master depth of field. This is the perfect time of year to take a Kerry Drager photo course!

Field Techniques: Dynamic Outdoor Photography
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD02.asp

Beyond Snapshots: Making the Most of Your Equipment
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD01.asp


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PHOTO LINKS
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Jim Zuckerman's Tips on Photographing Animals
Spring is an excellent time to photograph exotic animals - either in the wild, in a zoo, or on safari. Jim Zuckerman wrote an article for Peterson's Photographic that will help you get the best shots. Check out "How to: Photographing Exotic Animals" at:

http://www.photographic.com/showarchives.cgi?97

Jim also teaches two fantastic online courses here at BetterPhoto. Learn all about Mastering Light at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JZK02.asp

Or 8 ways to immediately spice up your photography:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JZK01.asp


*****
Check Out Tony Sweet's New DVD!
Tony has created an interesting and informative DVD featuring his photography and music. It's fun to watch and includes inspiring images from his collection of work on this DVD entitles Visual Rhythm. Visit his online store at TonySweet.com:
http://www.tonysweet.com/Online_Store/OnlineStore.html

Or consider learning directly from Tony with his two online courses here at BetterPhoto:

Fine Art Flower Photography (Perfect for the Spring season!)
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/TNS02.asp

Image Design: Revealing Your Personal Vision
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/TNS01.asp


*****
New and Improved Photo Marketing Course!!!
Join Bryan Peterson to learn the ins and outs of professionally marketing your photography to clients and stock agencies. In this intensive course, Bryan teaches tips and secrets that he has learned during 20+ years in the photo business. And Bryan has just finished rewriting this course to make it the best it can possibily be. Take advantage of this exciting opportunity - sign up today at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BFP03.asp

Note: To take this course, you will first either need to have graduated from Bryan's Learning to See Creatively course, or have been accepted after sending Bryan 12 of your best images via email.

Find out more about Learning to See Creatively at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BFP01.asp

Or email your sample images to Bryan at:
bfp@betterphoto.com

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
What film formats were introduced the year JFK was shot?

The first, best answer - entered by BettterPhoto member Bob F. is:
instamatic 128?

[Editor: This is very close to what I was looking for: 126 Cartridge / Instamatic Cameras and Polaroid instant color film were introduced in 1963, according to the Timeline of Photography at Eastman.org.



To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Birth of Kodak - entered by BettterPhoto member Jim M.

What year was Kodak formed?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Use Unique Angles
All too often, people photograph from only one point of view. To immediatly improve your photos by making them more interesting and unique, try photographing from a different point of view. If you are shooting a portrait of your child, for example, get down on his or her level. Or, think "how would my puppy see the world" and try to shoot from that angle. Also, remember to vary the orientation, using both vertical and horizontal formats. You can even try turning your camera on a 45 degree angle. Have fun getting creative - I'm sure that these techniques will help spice things up!

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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To order online, visit:
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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Sepia Photographs
How do you take Sepia photographs? I love the look and don't know much about it! Thanks.

- Tracey

ANSWER 1:
I know of two ways. I don't know what kind of camera you use, but you can buy sepia filters for most 35mm slr lenses. You can also take your pictures and change them to sepia digitally. This can be done with many photo programs. To be more specific, I need to know what kind of equipment, and software you have.

- Judith C.

ANSWER 2:
I have a 35mm Canon, not a digital camera. I'll have to keep my eye out for a filter and experiment!

- Tracey

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=5476

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=5476

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*****
NEW QUESTION 2: Scratch on Focus screen...will it affect my pics?
I have a used Minolta Maxxum 300si as my first 'real' camera. It has a small scratch on the focusing screen which I can see when looking through the viewfinder, but will it show up on my pics. -Ashamed to say, I scratched the screen myself(amatuers!)

Thanks!

- Kathy B.

ANSWER 1:
No, it won't show up on your pictures, because it does not interfere with the light coming through the lens and striking the film. It is a flaw in your viewing system only. When you press the shutter, the viewing system is out of the picture, so to speak, because the mirror flips up to let the light reach the film.

- Doug N.

See Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™:
http://www.DougNelsonPhoto.com

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=5472

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=5472

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*****
NEW QUESTION 3: Black and white photograhy
I am returning to photgraphy as a medium of self-expression. What is available these days in terms of black and white filmstock? Yes, it has been a while. The last stock I used was tri-x pushed to 1200 and processed with microdol. I've never tried Ilford and don't know if it is still available.

- David A.

ANSWER 1:
David,
Definitely!
You may not find it with consumer films and may have to look for it at a camera store that sells pro equipment and film . . . or order it from someplace like B&H Photo Video in NYC. To see Ilford's current line of B&W film:
http://www.ilford.com/

-- John

- John L.

See John's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=322

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=5469

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=5469

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*****
NEW QUESTION 4: How to Shoot Flowers and Other Plants
I've been asked to teach a two-hour photo workshop in July to high school kids on how to take good photos of flowers and other kinds of plants, from trees to vegetables. The session will be held outdoors at a farm that will provide photo opportuntities of gardens, trees and farm crops. The kids are being asked to bring their own cameras. I've taught informal photo seminars for years, so I'm prepared to present the rules of composition and other basic photo information. But I've never taught horticultural photography before. Any suggestions on good web sites or other sources that I can study to prepare my session? Thanks.

- Wayne

ANSWER 1:
Wayne,
I don't think this would be that much different from photographing other things. What is specifically done depends on what is desired for the photograph. Approach it from the formal elements:
- point
- line
- shape
- texture
- space
- value (highlight versus shadow)
- color
Lighting and compositional arrangement of these creates the photograph. One of the tasks you might think about is asking students to isolate these formal elements in their work . . . to make several photographs using each of them in turn as a single, principal element. It will get them thinking about how to use formal elements in a horticultural venue.

One of the surprising things found with many plants is symmetrical geometries and repetitive shapes.

Another aspect is exploring horitculture at different levels of scale. There are many things to be found on a very large scale (repeating rows of crops - shape and line) downward to a macro and then to a micro level. Doing things on a very small scale does require some tools for macrophotography, but if you have some of these at least they can be exposed to what it is, how to look for these things, some of the tools for it and the techniques for using them.

A few websites with horticultural and agricultural stock photographs:
http://www.gardenscape.com/HortPhotoGallery.html
http://www.agpix.com/
http://www.agri-image.com/

-- John

- John L.

See John's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=322

ANSWER 2:
John L. pretty much nailed it down!

In addition, you might want to be able to teach the plant and flower names to the kids, at this very intellectually absorbing part of their lives.

You may want to bring several diffusors and reflectors in the event of harsh sunlight. That would be a very effective lesson on the different qualities of light and how harsh light can be effectively managed.

But, the most important thing of all is HAVE FUN!!

- Tony S.

See Tony's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=22359

Take a photo course with Tony:
http://www.betterphoto.com/workshops.asp

ANSWER 3:
John and Tony,

Thanks for the helpful feedback on topics and tools. I plan to share a list of recommended web sites with the kids, as well as shooting tips and photo samples of horticultural subjects, with an emphasis on scale and formal elements. I like the idea of adding scientific names of the plants. And, of course, keeping it fun is always the key to teaching success. Let's hope the weather cooperates!

-- Wayne

- Wayne

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=5468

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=5468

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*****
NEW QUESTION 5: Resolution
I have an olympus c-4000. I don't understand why a picture taken at HQ produing a pictrue at 2288 x 1712 only has a vertical and horizontal resolution of 72 DPI. Shouldn't it be higher? When I scan the minimal resoultion I set is 300dpi. The digital pictures with the cammera I am printing are high quality, look great. I just am surprised to see such a low dpi on such a high width and height. What concept am I missing?

- Monica

ANSWER 1:
See if the following discussion helps:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=3013&catID=138
Digital cameras often show an image at 72 pixels-per-inch right out of the camera.

- Doug N.

See Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™:
http://www.DougNelsonPhoto.com

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=5463

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=5463

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*****
NEW QUESTION 6: Canon AE-1 Lens Mount
Do you know what type of lens mount Canon AE-1 has and if a t-mount type of an adapter can be used to mount any of the new manual focus lenses? Thanks.

- Marti

ANSWER 1:
The Canon mount is the FD mount. A few lenses are still being made for it. If you find some that need a T-mount, then the Canon FD T-mount is what you need.

Canon's own FD lenses are cheap and plentiful on ebay. They are well made, and, if the glass is OK, you can get years of service from them. I can't think of many new manual-focus lenses I'd choose over Canon's.

- Doug N.

See Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™:
http://www.DougNelsonPhoto.com

ANSWER 2:
Thank you Doug! This is the exact info that I was looking for and your knowledge has helped alot! You guys at BetterPhoto are great! Thanks again,

- Marti

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=5460

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=5460

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*****
NEW QUESTION 7: Lenses for Vivitar SLR using PK Mount
Hi,
I am looking for lenses for this camera from Vivitar model v3800N it is a totally manual everything camera (I was getting spoiled by AF APS Nikon Pronea 6i and wanted to learn how to do it all again myself). But I am having the dickens of a time locating lenses that use what appears to be a rather specific "mount" I can use any lens so long as it uses either a "Pentax PK Mount" or is just "PK Mount". Problem is when searching on the web at various online camera resellers they don't seem to tell me anything about the mount and some don't even know what I am talking about when I either call or email them. So does anyone here know of either good lens company or online store that carries large assortment of "PK Mount" lenses?

Thank you

- C. Brent S.

ANSWER 1:
The P in PK mount stands for Pentax. You need only look for lenses in K Mount. Though K mount autofocus lenses will mount and work (mostly) with your manual V3800N, I'd just look at manual focus K mount lenses (Unless you plan to add a Pentax autofocus camera at some time).

- Jon C.

ANSWER 2:
P.S. There are some sublties and a few incompatibilities within the K mount line of bodies and lenses as Pentax has updated it over time to add features like autofocus. Still, there is a high degree of compatibility between lenses and bodies of different eras. For more information see the extensive information at Bojidar Dimitrov's Pentax K Mount Page:

http://www.bdimitrov.de/kmp/

- Jon C.

ANSWER 3:
Hi Jon,

First thank you for the wondefully fast turnaround on what I thought was going to be a hard question. I just wish my Vivitar owners manual had spelled it out as clearly as you have done, it might have saved me dollars in the Tums I have been taking to control heartburn over thinking I got a camera that I'd never find any lenses for. Do you know if all Pentax lenses use the K mount?

Thanks again,

C. Brent Smith

p.s. the website is wonderful (yours and the one you sent for Pentax info).

- C. Brent S.

ANSWER 4:
Hi C. Brent,
Glad I could help, but BetterPhoto is not my site. Jim Miotke runs it. (thumbs up!) I'm just a visitor who likes to help if I can.

Early Pentax 35mm SLRs used a threaded screw mount, commonly called M or M42 (for 42mm diameter). In 1975 they introduced the bayonet K mount and have used variations of it since.

- Jon C.

ANSWER 5:
This sounds like a good opportunity to say thanks to BetterPhoto members like Jon Close, John Lind, Jeff Kennedy, and Doug Nelson, just to name a few, who generously give their time and knowledge to helpfully answer so many questions week after week. We all really appreciate it!

- Jim at BetterPhoto.com

See Jim's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=124

Take a photo course with Jim:
http://www.betterphoto.com/workshops.asp

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=5456

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=5456

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*****
NEW QUESTION 8: Taking Pictures of Baby
I enjoy taking pictures of my daughter in natural light. I turn off the flash and use 400 ISO, but sometimes the pictures are blurry or grainy and dark. I usually use the autofocus. Should I use a faster film and change aperture/shutter speed?

- Jan S.

ANSWER 1:
Are you using a tripod? What are you metering and how?

- Jeff K.

ANSWER 2:
I am relatively new to photography, so I don't know much about metering. Could that be my problem? I try to use a tripod, but my daughter crawls and that makes it difficult.

- Jan S.

ANSWER 3:
If she's mobile then maybe you do need to consider a faster film or at least shooting her in brighter light. I would pick the fastest lens you have. Meter off of her face and open up one stop (if she's caucasian anyway).

- Jeff K.

ANSWER 4:
Jan, I suspect since you are new to photography you may be confusing the terms here. By "natural lighting" are you sure you don't mean "available lighting"?

400 iso film with an opened lens (f/stop) in good natural lighting should produce fast enough shutter speeds to stop motion.

At any rate, not knowing what type of camera you are using makes it difficult to narrow down the advice, however, if you are using an SLR with AF/AE with custom controls, I suggest you use shutter priority and use speeds applicable to the subjects movements, all other factors taken into consideration, of course.

If you are using a point-and-shoot, which has AF, then you are forced to either increase the lighting by getting nearer to its source (sunny window, etc) or increase film speeds.

The nice thing about black and white photos is its blindness to light temperatures. Therefore, adding halogen lamplight to the scene (or any electrcal light source)can help you a lot without changing the white balance. Something to consider.

- Michael H.

ANSWER 5:
Michael,
You are correct, I meant "available light" (doorway, window, etc.) I have an N65 SLR. I have been using the auto feature,that sets aperture and shutter speed automatically, but didn't know is maybe bumping up the film speed would help. I hear conflicting opinion about the graininess of 800 vs. 400. I just want to stop using the flash and obtain a softer more natural look. I may have to experiment with lighting at different times of day and in different locations. Thanks!

- Jan S.

ANSWER 6:
Jan,
Take a peek at these photographs at this website: http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=162805

Look at the jet airliner I shot as it passed overhead (300mm zoom lens), and the red coupe. I took them using Fuji's 800 iso. Do you see any objectionable grain? I think you will find grain increases more in dim light, regardless of ISO's.. Yes, it was brilliant sunlight, but still no grain worth worrying about. Use the enlargement feature on the website to blow up the shots and you'll see what I mean.

If you bought the N65 (a good camera)with a kit lens as Nikon markets it, then you have the 28-80mm G series zoom lens which does an admirable job for the bucks. It's a tad slow on the open end, but that is a zoom's weakpoint, usually.

At any rate, it never hurts to try these films. I find Fuji's films are less grainy than most all others.

PS I like to shoot 800 at 600, but you cannot do that with an N65. I know because I have that camera, too. I also shoot with several other Nikon's.

Try it, and see!

- Michael H.

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=5448

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=5448

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*****
NEW QUESTION 9: Wedding Photography and Developing
I'm an amateur trying to learn the ropes by reading and lots of trial and error. A friend is on a tight budget and has asked me to shoot her wedding (this will be my first - yikes!) She would like a lot of the pictures to be B&W photojournalistic style. I haven't done much of that. Any words of wisdom or tips I should know?? Also are there any professional developing labs that you recommend? Is there a big difference between developing through one of them as opposed to my local photo shop? I'm sure there is, I just want to hear your comments. Thank you!

- Tracey

ANSWER 1:
Give us more info. What kind of equipment (specifically lenses) do you have? Is the wedding indoors or out? What part of the coutry are you in (someone may know a good lab close to you)? Feel free to email me privately if you like @ imagesbyjk@aol.com and check out my website at www.imagesbyjeffkennedy.com .

- Jeff K.

ANSWER 2:
Sorry, I should have given more detail (remember, I'm an amateur!). I currently have a Canon EOS 2000. I have a 50mm lense, 80-200mm and the 35-80mm that came with the camera. The wedding will be indoors and I just found out I won't be the only one taking their pictures - whew. But I do want to do the best job I can. Any tips would be greatly appreciated or any recommendations for lenses or filters I should get would be great. I live in NJ so if anyone can recommend a good lab, please let me know. Thank you for your time!

- Tracey

ANSWER 3:
http://www.zuga.net/freelessons/portrait.shtml

Look under Monte Zucker, one of the famous portrait and wedding photographers, and you will find lots of articles about lighting, posing and other techniques about general portrait and weddings.

Try to use some profession films like Kodak Portra 400 NC or Portra 400 VC and develop using Kodak's Premium Processing (stores advertised they use Kodak paper do not necessarily use Kodak processing). I live in NJ too and I go to ShopRite to drop off my film because I have a choice for Kodak processing or ShopRite processing. I always choose Kodak Processing (they actually send the film to Kodak for processing) and it's about double the price. But it's worth it. I still haven't found any 'lab' close to where I live yet.

Hope this helps.

- Andy S.

ANSWER 4:
If they're looking for photojournalistic style shots you should probably be thinking black & white. If you have a flash get a bounce attachment for it and practice with it so you know what you're doing. If you want (and can) to shoot with natural light I suggest high speed films like Kodak P3200 or Ilford Delta 3200. Ideally I like to rate them at ISO1600. If you are going for the natural light approach I would stick with the 50mm lens as it is probably your fastest (not to mention sharpest). I wouldn't worry about filters. Keep it as simple as possible.

Zuga.net may or may not be valuable to you. Monte is more of a traditional shooter as opposed to photojournalistic. Check out websites of photographers for ideas. Check out mine and feel free to email me if you have any questions or if you want suggestions for other sites.

As far as labs there must be an A&I lab somewhere back there. The only thing to consider with a pro lab is they may require that you set up an account or do a certain amount of business with them a year. Of course if this is the only time you use them they don't need to know that. A good way to find a lab is to contact studios in your area and ask who they use.

- Jeff K.

ANSWER 5:
Tracey,
See my "wedding survival guide" written with your situation in mind:
http://johnlind.tripod.com/wedding/

Even with weddings that include formal portraiture, the photojournalistic aspect is normally the majority of frames shot at a wedding. If formal portraits (also called "altar returns") are not desired I try to shoot more frames during the ceremony.

You may or may not be able to use a flash during most of the ceremony. If not, you will need to plan for using very fast film to cover that portion using existing light. I've used Fuji Press 1600 quite successfully. A pro lab can make B&W prints from color negatives. Alternatives for true B&W negatives are TMax P3200 and Ilford Delta 3200. I've also used these at EI 1600. Both of them multi-speed films must be push processed if used at film speeds higher than their nominal ISO 800 rating. This can only be done by a pro lab and there is a nominal surcharge for doing the push processing.

For shots with flash, Kodak's ISO 125 Plus-X Pan and ISO 400 Tri-X Pan are both "classic" B&W films which may fit the type of B&W look your friend wants. Both have been used for photojournalism and editorial work for decades.

I recommend against using a consumer lab for wedding photographs if you are *the* photographer. Aside from more consistent developing and especially printing, a decent full-service pro lab is also much more reliable at not losing film or screwing up the developing. Wedding photos are not something you can go back and shoot over again if something happens to the film (prints can be reprinted as long as the negatives are OK).

The biggest pitfalls for non-professionals roped into shooting a wedding:
a. Not having enough batteries or film.
b. Not having enough flash power for longer distances in larger spaces.
c. Inadequate planning for the types of photographs and significant events before, during and after the ceremony that need to be covered.
d. Trying to be a "guest" as well as the official photographer; the two do not mix well.

You *can* have fun doing it if you coordinate with your friend, adequately plan what you will do, and practice some as needed for the types of photographs you will be shooting.

-- John

- John L.

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ANSWER 6:
Thanks for all your time and input! Wish me luck! ;-)

- Tracey

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*****
NEW QUESTION 10: What is an electronic through-the-lens viewfinder
I'm trying to figure out what the difference is between an SLR and an electronic through-the-lens veiwfinder is. I currently have an SLR lens with my Olympus Camedia C-2500L. But I'm looking for something similar for my mom and don't know what some of the viewfinder terminology is.

Thanks in advance!

- Shelly S.

ANSWER 1:
SLR is the abbreviation for Single Lens Reflex, the "reflex" being a mirror. You view the scene directly through the viewfinder.

With an electronic viewfinder, like on the C-2500L, you get the view through the taking lens (no paralax error), but you're looking at a small LCD screen. The LCD image will not be as "fine grained" or detailed as the viewfinder in an SLR, and it may or may not also present colors accurately.

- Jon C.

ANSWER 2:
So is the "electronic through-the-lens viewfinder" SLR-like? I don't want to have to look at the LCD screen to see what I'm taking a picture of. Our C-2500L is shown as being SLR-like (so are the Fujifilm FinePix S602Z, Minolta DiMAGE 5, Minolta DiMAGE 7i, Epson PhotoPC 3100, Fujifilm FinePix 6900, Minolta DiMAGE 7, Nikon Coolpix 570o....) I want to know what they mean by "electronic through-the-lens viewfinder."

Thanks again

- Shelly S.

ANSWER 3:
I wanted to add that even though this camera is "old" in digital camera standards, it was the only digital SLR on the market (at the time) it featured a true TTL (through the lens) viewfinder view and excellent image quality. Now that we are trying to find something for my mom, I don't know any of the jargon (like electronic through-the-lens viewfinder). I only know that what we have is great, although becoming outdated. And I know that I hate those cameras where people are always looking at the little screen trying to take their pictures.

- Shelly S.

ANSWER 4:
The difference is that the SLR has a mirror and a prism that allows you an actual optical view with your eye through the lens. The electronic TTL has no prism and instead represents the view electronically on an LCD screen. The view is the same but the technique of providing it is different.

- Wayne A.

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*****
NEW QUESTION 11: Flash problems
I recently purchased a studio flash w/umbrella and I've never used one before. The problem I had before this purchase was on indoor shots. Most of the time, half the photo was dark and the other half light. Since I got the studio flash, the result has been the same. My slave flash on my camera was angled rather than direct on the subject. I've bene asked to take pictures at prom and need them to be perfect. What am I doing wrong?

- Cindy L.

ANSWER 1:
If your flash shots are coming out with only half the frame exposed that indicates that you are shooting above your cameras sync speed. What shutter speed are you using and what kind of camera is it?

- Jeff K.

ANSWER 2:
The camera I'm using is a Canon Rebel G. Last night I was just playing around, trying to get use to the flash unit and had it on the basic setting for pictures. If I use the pop up flash that's on the camera, then things are ok. However, it's when I use the slave that's causing problems. Prom is only 2 weeks away. Do I need to add another light?

- Cindy L.

ANSWER 3:
Cindy,
When you use the studio light alone . . . without the pop-up built in to your camera . . . you must set the shutter speed manually to 1/90th or slower, the Rebel G's X-sync speed. Put the camera in manual exposure mode and set the shutter speed to 1/90th or 1/60th second.

When using studio flash (a.k.a. monolight or strobe), exposure is basically controlled by a combination of the power level you manually set on the studio strobe and setting lens aperture manually. Shutter speed is manually set to ensure the shutter is completely open when the flash fires.

From your description of what's happening, it's most likely that the camera is automatically setting itself to the X-sync speed (or slower) when you pop up the built-in flash and activate it. If nothing automatically signals the camera to do this through the pop-up or the hot shoe, it will pick shutter speed on its own . . . unless you manually force it to X-sync or slower.

Regarding setting exposure . . . through a combination of power adjustment on the studio light and manually setting lens aperture, you should be using a "flash meter." This is a special type of hand held exposure meter. There are some inexpensive ones under $100 that will work OK for what you are doing.

-- John

- John L.

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*****
NEW QUESTION 12: What Type of Lens to Buy?
Hello all, my name is Mike and I am relatively new to the world of SLR photography. After a bit of research, I recently purchased my first SLR camera, the Canon EOS Rebel G. The camera came with a 35-80mm lens, but I have been told this is not the best lens. Iím looking for some advice on a better lens to buy thatís not overly expensive but will still help me get the most out of my purchase. Any thoughts will really help and be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,

- Mike

ANSWER 1:
Mike, what are you planing to shoot? If you are new and just shoot family snap shots, this lens will be fine. I have a 70-300mm lens that I have only used twice. I shoot portraits mostly and use my 50mm lens more then anything. If you plan on shooting landscapes you may need a wide angle lens. Need more info to fully answer this question.

- Judith C.

ANSWER 2:
Judith,
Thanks for your response. In answer to your inquiries, Iím not really sure what I will shoot. I think Iím leaving that open to what ever strikes me as interesting, but I feel that I am leaning more towards photographing nature. I plan on taking a local photography workshop this summer. I guess I am just looking for advice on a good all-around second lens to purchase that will accompany the one I already have. Thanks again.

- Mike

ANSWER 3:
This is just a suggestion from a fellow amature. I would go with a wide angle for landscapes, and a good long lens for wildlife. The few times I have used my 70-300mm lens has been for a shot of a butterfly for a class ( looks like I'm sitting on top of it) a few deer, and some shots of sail boats on the near by lake. I love the shots I've taken with it I just don't have much time alone to shoot these kind of shots. I will however by a long zoom lens to fit my digital soon. I also would love a fish-eye lens to play with, but its not in my budget right now.

- Judith C.

ANSWER 4:
Mike, I was in the same boat as you. I bought the same camera and had no specific subject to shoot. However I have always gone toward the nature shots simply because it is always available. I did buy an 80-200 Canon lens recently but I am wishing I bought the wide angle first. As Judith said, they are great for landscape shots and I could have used the wide angle on a recent trip. I started shooting with a Canon AE-1 that was givien to me so the Rebel is a Godsend.

- Ray

ANSWER 5:
Thanks guys. I really appreciate your advice. I think I will look into purchasing a wide angle lens.

- Mike

ANSWER 6:
For about $270 I would recommend the Tamron 28-200/3.5-5.6 Asph. XR IF Macro. It is of moderate wide angle and zoom but much more lighter and shorter than its older version. I had it on my Rebel 1000Fn. Just make sure you get the one for Canon EOS system.

- Andy S.

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*****
NEW QUESTION 13: Slides Chrome
I want to start using color slide film. I heard that you can get better images this way somehow.
Could someone help start me off in doing this? What equipment do I need, a loupe, light box, what?
And how do I get better prints from these?

- TYRONE W.

ANSWER 1:
Tyrone,
Not certain what you mean by "better" images. I use a lot of different types of film . . . B&W negative, B&W transparency (slide: Agfa Scala), color negative and color transparency (slide). Why? It depends on what I envision for the photograph. If you are doing landscapes, macros of flora (plants), wildlife (large or small), then the "slide" films can deliver some bold and dramatic photographs. Slide films may not be that suitable for some other types of subject material, such as formal portraits. Again, it depends on what you envision for the photograph and what you want it to look like. I mention all this up front because I don't want you to think that one film or film type "does it all." As you grow in photography, look at film selection as yet another tool to get what you want in the photographs you are making. Don't be afraid to use a half-dozen or more different kinds of film . . . and let the type(s) of photograph(s) you are making determine which film you will use for it.

To start, you should at least have a loupe in the 4X to 8X range and a light box. For 35mm slides I tend to prefer loupes toward the 8X end as it allows looking at finer detail and evaluating sharpness of the image better. You can also get an inexpensive battery powered slide viewer for rough editing . . . eliminating slides you definitely do not want to consider printing. These are handy for this task, but lack the magnification needed to look at finer details. Eventually, you may want to get a slide projector. However, ensure it has an *excellent* lens such as the Schneider Vario-Prolux. A poor projector lens will project an image poorly. I have a small, flat white 20 X 20 inch panel mounted on a wall of my study. Final editing is done by projecting slides on this panel. While the same thing could be done with a loupe and a light box, I've found this easier. A projector and excellent lens *is* more expensive though. Do this only if you're certain you're going to be shooting slides a lot.

There are three methods for printing slides:

Internegative:
This method uses a machine to photograph the slide using a special color negative film. This "internegative" is then used to make a print on standard color negative print paper. The "internegative" is typically discarded after making the prints. IMO this is the least desirable method; you are making a copy of the slide and then printing that . . . a copy of a copy.

Direct Printing:
This prints the slide using a "positive" print material directly from the slide . . . just as a print would be made using negative print materials to directly print color negative films. IMO this method offers the best printing if it's done correctly. All of my prints from slides are made using this method.

Digital Printing:
This prints the slide by scanning it to a digital file and then printing the digital file on some form of print material. IMO, the results from this can be quite variable depending on the scan quality, the printer used and the print materials. A high end custom job on "display" quality print materials using a high end commercial printer can be nearly as good as a high quality optical print made by direct printing. In general, I consider this the second best method.

For inexpensive printing I have selected slides printed by "The Slide Printer" in Denver, Colorado. They make direct prints from the slides using Fuji print materials designed for direct printing slides. I have large, more expensive custom prints done using Ilfochrome print materials by a lab in Austin, Texas. Ilfochrome is a special print material made by Ilford, an English company, and is also designed for direct printing slides.

-- John

- John L.

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Cameras and Airports
How is the best way to take your Digital (flash cards) and film cameras through todays airports safely?

- Danny G.

ANSWER 1:
As far as I know, the carry-on and checked baggage X-ray machines have no effect on electronic storage media. Digital cameras, flash cards, computers, CD-R/RW, etc. are ok.

For film cameras you should carry-on only. The checked baggage x-rays will fog all speeds of film, and I think there is higher likelyhood of camera and lenses being lost/stolen/damaged in checked baggage. You can request that carry-on film be hand inspected, but your as likely to be refused as accomodated. Either way, the carry-on scanners are safe for several passes of up to 800 speed film.

- Jon C.

ANSWER 2:
On Kodak's website, it explains how carry-on scanners affect even slower speeds. It puts up examples, and then it also has a link to the page from the FAA's regulation book where it states in section 108, article 17, paragraph 5e that they have to grant us a physical inspection if we so request. But I suggest bringing along a changing bag, because they don't need to be equipped with anything, and they will open a packet of 4x5 film. I think those special handling gloves are good too.

I've had a lot of problems at airports and I travel a lot- most foreign countries are pretty cool, but I've had too many problems here in the states- this info is useful to have handy when they say no to a hand inspection.

here's the link to kodak's website
http://www.kodak.com/global/en/service/tib/tib5201.shtml

- Sreedevi S.

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