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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, December 22, 2003
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* SPOTLIGHT: BetterPhoto Online PhotoCourses™ - Winter Session Begins January 7th
* BETTERPHOTO: Treat Yourself to the Beautiful November Contest Winners
* BETTERPHOTO: Digital Photography Course Already Full? Here's An Excellent Alternative
* BETTERPHOTO: Frozen Beauty - Article on Winter Photography by Brenda Tharp
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Master of Her Genre / Fugitive Clues
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: From Our Top Ten List - Look for Reflections
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Characteristics of 35mm SLR
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Best Lens for Elan 7E
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Settings For Night Shots of Christmas Lights
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Sigma SD10 Compared to Film Cameras
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Securing Equipment Against Loss Onsite
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Film-Based - Infrared Film
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Taking Photos of Metallic Surfaces
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 3: Bracketing and Film
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 4: Taking Better 35mm Slides With Nikon F-100


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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BetterPhoto Online PhotoCourses™ - Winter Session Begins January 7th
Would you like to learn more about photography? Are you struggling to gain a better understanding of the principles of exposure, composition, digital photography, photographic field techniques, or even Photoshop?

Join us for an inspiring online photo course at BetterPhoto.com. Let us be your guide... with our online courses, you will become a better photographer. Our Winter session of photography courses promises to fill those long winter days with creativity and inspiration.

For more information and a complete listing of the latest courses being offered, visit the BetterPhoto home page or:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 140th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

First off, let me wish you all a wonderful holiday week. I sincerely hope you are all able to relax and enjoy a harmonious break from the daily routine.

As one of our gifts to you, we have been posting the Top Ten Tips for Holiday Photography. Each day, we have been posting a new tip, counting down to the all-time best tip for the holidays. Tips #6, #5, and #4 are now on the site. Visit the Web page below to learn how to capture the best holiday pictures you can.

The contest-goers will also be happy to note that we have the November winners and finalists posted. Wow! And I mean WOW! What great photos we see in the contest. Honestly, it's inspiring! Check out the link below to see for yourself how great these winning images are.

Again, have a great holiday season. Resist the urge to pick up that extra cookie or candycane... instead pick up your camera and take a few more great pictures :-)

Happy Holidays from all of us at BetterPhoto!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Treat Yourself to the Beautiful November Contest Winners
Many incredible photos in the finalists this month! It was both a challenge and a treat for the judging panel to vote on these great photos as they selected the top 56 winning photos. As difficult as it was, it was worth the effort. These award-winning photographs will literally knock your socks off!

A big congratulations goes out to the awesome Heather McFarland for her Grand Prize winning photo from the Graphics, Details and Flowers category. Congratulations are also due to Lyn Winans, Jenifer Evison, Bas Meelker, Connie Carpenter, and Doug Benner for their beautiful First Place winning images, as well as to all of the fantastic winners and finalists.

For a holiday treat, browse the Grand Prize, First Place, and 50 Second Place winning photos at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/contest/winners/0311.asp

Or you can enjoy viewing 384 contest finalists at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=2485


*****
Digital Photography Course Already Full? Here's An Excellent Alternative
As you may have noticed, the Betterphoto courses are filling up fast, due to limited enrollment. No worries, though... we have plenty of great alternatives.

If your favorite course is already full, check our Home page for classes that still have openings. Or call our Order Department at 1-888-927-9992 - we will be happy to help you find the most compatible and fitting class.

For example, if you wanted to take Jim Miotke's "Digital Photography" course, check out this new alternative by Susan and Neil Silverman - "Digital Workout #1". Packed with excellent lessons, fun assignments, and awe-inspiring photography, this course shows you all you need to know to begin capturing fantastic digital images:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/SIL01.asp


*****
Frozen Beauty - Article on Winter Photography by Brenda Tharp
In this article at Apogee, BetterPhoto instructor Brenda Tharp teaches you how to capture the scenes of winter while surviving the challenges of the cold.

It you would like to learn photography with Brenda's direct guidance, consider enrolling in one of her excellent courses here at BetterPhoto.com:

Join "Creating Visual Impact" to learn how to make creative and expressive images that pop off the page:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BRN01.asp

Enroll in "Beyond the Postcard" to learn how to capture perfect travel photos - everywhere you go:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BRN02.asp

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
What kind of photography is Annie Liebowitz most famous for?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Rumiana Tenchova is:
Portraits of celebrities; women

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Fugitive Clues - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

In The Fugitive, Dr. Richard Kimble (played by Harrison Ford) leads the U.S. Marshall Samuel Gerard (played by Tommy Lee Jones) to a particular photograph found at the killer's home. What is the subject of this photo and how does it help?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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From Our Top Ten List - Look for Reflections
The following is Tip #6 from our growing list of the all-time Top Ten Tips for shooting during the holidays.

One the quickest and easiest ways to add an artistic touch to your holiday photos is to focus on capturing reflections rather than the object itself.

Simply keep an eye out for interesting splashes of color, reflected from Christmas lights and other holiday decorations.

This is one time when rainy days are your friends - puddles in the street can be a perfect source of abstract images - photos that suggest the essence of the holidays without being direct and explicit.

You can also look for interesting shadows and other graphic elements. Or you can include out of focus Christmas lights, to give your photo an evocative, unique background. See Heather McFarland's previous contest winner - Holiday Cheer - for an excellent example of this technique.

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Characteristics of 35mm SLR
What characteristic of a 35mm SLR make it different from the rest of the 35mm family?
- Nita Dj

ANSWER 1:
An SLR, or single lens reflex camera, has a series of mirrors which permit the user to see through the same lens which is taking the picture. Non-SLR cameras have a seperate viewfinder window.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7577

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7577

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*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Best Lens for Elan 7E
Need to know what works best with an Elan 7E. I already have a Sigma 100-300 for Sports photography (my passion) but need a lens for everyday use. Should I go with a fixed focal or zoom? I mostly do general portraiture. I'm not long on the pocket now so it's a budget of $150. I was thinking of either a 28-1-5 or 28-135.
- Andy

ANSWER 1:
Want to see what top quality 35mm looks like, with excellent resolution and almost no distortion? Look at the old metal version 50mm f1.8 or the current 50 f1.4. Don't shy away from a lens keh.com rates as Bargain.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Are the zooms any good or is the quality of the 50mm so much better that it makes the convenience obsolete?
- Andy

ANSWER 3:
The Tamron 28-300mm XR does excellent up close and far off. I have one on my Elan 7. I have seen them for $249 - great deal now - I paid $339 1 year ago....
- George Crow

ANSWER 4:
The flexibility and much improved optical quality are definitely factors in favor of the better zooms. I just think it's a shame for a serious photog not to have at least one prime lens, especially since 50's are relatively cheap. A 50 will also get you available light shots using wide apertures that a zoom cannot, and no distortion at the edges that you'd ever notice. If you don't want to shell out for the 1.4, at least pick up a metal body 1.8 on an auction site.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7561

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7561

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NEW QUESTION 3: Settings For Night Shots of Christmas Lights
I'm trying to take night shots of my home decorated with Christmas lights. I'd like as little blur as possible. I have a Canon D60... can you help?
- Janae L. Runyon

ANSWER 1:
Tripod. Or park you car in front of your house, put the camera on the car roof or hood, use the timer and set for a long exposure. Did I mention try a tripod?
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
And use a slow ISO such as 100. As long as you are using a tripod, this will result in the clearest, colorful low-light photos.
- Jim at BetterPhoto.com

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Jim Miotke's Online Photography Classes

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http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7560

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Sigma SD10 Compared to Film Cameras
Help! I think I am ready to go digital but am so confused! In the past 6 months I have broken 2 of my good lenses, so it is no longer really important that I stay with the Cannon EOS line, however I do love my EOS 35 mm. I just saw an add for the Sigma SD10 and it looks like a great camera but I don't know anything about them and no one seems to have one that I can look at. It is a 10.2 MP camera but has a FOVEON X3 system that I have never heard of. I guess this is 3 layers of pixel sensors stacked up so that there is over 3 MP of blue, red and green? When I looked at another website that compared cameras, and how large you can blow them up to it did not look like it measured up to other larger pixel cameras... more like a 4 MP camera. Hoverever I know that Sigma had the best lens of the year last year and has great professional lenses. The camera is only $1,500 with 2 lenses (non prof lenses). Does anyone know anything about these cameras?

With almost ever photo shoot that I do, I sell a 20x24, so it is VERY important that I have a camera that can do this. I also work fast because I do a lot of toddlers and I like shooting them in action. The website I got the info on is Sigma-photo.com. Also, does anyone know how these MP add up to 35 mm? For instance is a 5 MP considered as good as a 35 MM and 10, a medium format? I need direction!
- Margaret Z. Wolff

See Margaret's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Margaret,

From what I've read in magazines and on-line, it sounds to me like the Sigma SD10 is a good idea whose implementation is not quite ready for prime-time. I've read that the picture quality and color balance are not as good as expected. The Canon EOS 10D seems to be the hot camera right now and arguably the best of the digital SLRs.

As far as comparison between digital and 35mm, there is a big discussion on this other places on this web site. Some say that a good digital camera is as good as 35mm, while others say it is not. However, without interpolation software (resampling in PhotoShop or using a tool like Genuine Fractals), you cannot enlarge a digital image to 20x24 and get good prints. Interpolation means the software basically adds more pixels by making an educated guess about what the new pixels should look like based on the surrounding pixels.

None of the current batch of consumer or semi-pro digital cameras comes close to matching medium format film. You can buy a digital back for your medium format cameras, but they cost almost as much as a nice new car! I've never used a digital back, but if anyone here has please let us know what you think of it.

For the sake of argument, let's assume that 5MP is close to 35mm in quality. A piece of 35mm film is roughly an inch by an inch and a quarter in size. A medium format negative would be something like 2 1/4 inches square (or a bit larger, depending on the camera format). In this example, the MF film is 5x the area of the 35mm film (5x larger). To get twice the number of pixels in a 5MP camera, you need to have not 10MP but 20MP (think of it as twice as many pixels horizontally and twice as many vertically). So, to get 5x the pixels of the 5MP camera, you need not 25MP, but 50MP.
- Tim Devick

ANSWER 2:
Tim, thank you so much for your responce, it was very helpful. I would love the Cannon 1DS but that isn't going down enough either. Although, I have seen at digital liquidators it is down around $6,000. It is still out of my price range. I just don't want to go digital until I know I can use it for my business. It looks like I may be waiting awhile longer. I am surprised that the D10 didn't go down at all in price since last year. Maybe in another year the digital SLR's will start going down in price. Thank you so much for your responce!
- Margaret Z. Wolff

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ANSWER 3:
I haven't tried but what if you shoot everything in RAW files? Didn't that give you a large enough file that you could make 20x30 blow-ups?
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
Well, print image quality is tied more directly to the number of pixels in your image than file size. Even if you start from a TIFF file, you have the same number of pixels in your image; the TIFF will be slightly better quality because it isn't compressed, but the number of pixels in your image hasn't changed.

The recommendation for printing seems to be to keep the number of pixels per inch close to 300 (although I have printed 250 pixels/inch and got nice looking prints). If you start with a 5MP image and print it at 18x24, you will get 107 pixels/inch in your finished print. If you print at 20x26, you'll get about 96 pixels/inch. This is about a third of the pixel density recommended for a good print.
- Tim Devick

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7553

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7553

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Securing Equipment Against Loss Onsite
Can anyone offer any advice about how one prevents the loss of equipment while onsite, for instance, a wedding reception? Anybody know of portable equipment that might be available to me? Any original ideas about how to protect the extra lenses, filters, cameras? I want the freedom to move around and it's absolutely necessary to be able to move around and not anchored to a table,etc. You know what I'm getting at. I have an assistant, but she also cannot be stationary.

Thank you for your input.
- Dennis Martineau

ANSWER 1:
A photo vest with all those pockets? Somebody makes one that's black and it's supposed to look more like a dress up vest instead of the khaki ones. Supposed to help you blend in.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Thank you, Greg. I was thinking of some sort of portable container that looks good, is light and is secure. Or am I trying to tote too much around? Should I only be carrying what can go into the pockets of a photographer's vest? What about all of the backup equipment that I have read about that I should have in the event of equipment failure?

Thank you.
- Dennis Martineau

ANSWER 3:
Well you can buy metal cases that have the foam padding inside and they're lockable. You talking about lighting equipment or extra bodies and lenses?
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
Yes, I'm talking about 2 extra camera bodies and 3-4 extra lenses. I have cases, but I am concerned about things coming up missing from inside as I can't stand guard over them.

Thanks.
- Dennis Martineau

ANSWER 5:
I used to manage a catering facility where we hosted many wedding recepions.
The photographers we worked with regularly would often request access to a locked closet or spare bridal suite to store the equipment they could't carry with them.
If no such space was available, they would store their gear close to the DJ, or in an out of the way corner near an area of heavy traffic... (such as the bar).
People are less likely to pilfer with many eyes watching them.

Hope this helps.
- Bob Cammarata

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Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Film-Based - Infrared Film
I've been reading about various types of film. I've only used slide film and negative film. But, recently I saw some photographs made with infrared film. They appear to be black and white. I don't ever recall seeing this film for sale anywhere (for example, B&H) and certainly not at local camera shops. Can anyone explain what infrared is, a time when it would be better to use it, and where to get it. Also, any special equipment necessary to make it effective.
Thanks a million.
- Cathy Sylvester

ANSWER 1:
HI Cathy:
B&H sells infrared film. With an 25 red or opaque filter, the film records light on the infrared spectrum. Just type in "infrared photography" in your search engine to see many illustrations of this film. Without one of the aforementioned filters, the images will look like regular black and white film.
- Tony Sweet

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Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 2:
Thanks Tony. I have a red filter and have used it with regular b/w film. It appears to give better contrast when used and film is developed. I always tell my lab that I've used it. I'll try B&H and try the film, compare it to what I've done and see what differences there could be.
- Cathy Sylvester

ANSWER 3:
B&W infrared film is hard to find, harder than color infrared. But like Tony said, B&H or any other professional photo store will have it. Infrared film senses infrared wave lengths which exist where there is the most heat, so basically it records heat. I would use 28 red, or an even deeper red filter. For B&W it produces amazing pictures. The pictures themselves will not look truly B&W as the film records the heat as red.

It is also incredibly, incredibly sensitive to light. If you have one of those cameras where you can see that little bit of film when you look on the back cover- you could ruin the film. You really have to load your camera in the dark, because even that will ruin the film.

You could also choose to rate it differently. Personally I find rating it at ISO 25 works wonders, as it allows you to record a lot of the movement of heat. Now, this won't necessarily be very dramatic, but you'll see different grades of red in your shots, where the heat is moving. It's interesting, and rather serene.

Make sure when you get the film developed, you take it to a professional photo lab, and tell them what ISO you shot it at. They develop it for the way you shot it.

Try experimenting with color infrared as well. It's especially outstanding in scenic shots on a clear, sunny day, or when the sun is rising and setting.
- Sreedevi

ANSWER 4:
Hey, cathy!
Infrared red film, used with a 25 red filter, records images with the hottest (temperature wise) parts of the images as the highlights and the coolest (again, think heat, not color temperature) appearsing as the lowlights. So for instance, if you go outside and shoot a grove of trees on a sunny day using regular film, the leaves will appear more or less medium in tone, depending on their actual color and your exposure, but on infrared, they'll look white. Also, infrared film has a very beautiful, organic, high-grained quality to it that is different from any other high grained b&w film. I my experience, you'll get the best results "in the field" with this film. Always bracket widely -- the results are often un predictable. Use tungsten lights if shooting in stduio -- strobes don't "heat up" the subject, nor does indoor natural light, so the results can be rather uninteresting. NOTE: This film is highly sensitive and must be loaded and unloaded in the dark.
- Vik Orenstein

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ANSWER 5:
Thanks to everyone for taking the time to give me advise. I definitely am going to try this film and techniques associated with it. B&H was out of it and I'm on a waiting list for it. My local "pro" film shops are SO expensive and I try to save $$ where I can. I appreciate your help, and will post my results; no matter how they are!
- Cathy Sylvester

ANSWER 6:
One thing I forgot to mention. Generally, when you focus, for infrared it's slightly different. If you have a manual focus camera, look at the focusing ring. You'll see a red line next to the center. This is for infrared. So when you focus on your subject, look at the distance and move that distance to the red line. It's sometimes good to use a higher DOF just as a precaution.
- Sreedevi

ANSWER 7:
I have several cameras; all Canon SLR EOS brands. I often use the AF mode but usually use the manual mode. Thanks for telling me about the red line. I'll have to go look. I don't recall ever noticing it. I'm looking forward to trying this film as I'm sure others are now that we've had this discussion.
- Cathy Sylvester

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*****


CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Taking Photos of Metallic Surfaces
How do you take a photo with out a glare or reflections, of a metallic surface?
- Aravind Benaka

ANSWER 1:
Hi Aravind: A polarizer helps tone down glare or shine on many surfaces, though not all.

But what I've done with metallic surfaces - say, the chrome on a car - is to use a small aperture. The small lens aperture (which is a large f/stop number) can turn glare into very nice sunbursts or starbursts.

Other options:

- Switch your camera position slightly. Although this may not necessarily remove all of the glare, it might re-arrange the reflections and make them less of a problem.

- Try the scene at another time. This might not be convenient - or even possible! - but a different position of the sun can make the difference.

- By the way, make sure any flash, or fill flash, is turned off.

Hope this helps, Aravind!
- Kerry A. Drager

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http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7383

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*****


CONTINUING QUESTION 3: Bracketing and Film
According to most literature on the principles of photographic exposure, it is advised that transparency film should be bracketed in 1/2 or even 1/3 increments; in contrast, black and white and color negative film should be bracketed in full stops.

Now, I understand the concepts behind bracketing and exposure latitude, but what I don't understand is why you would NOT want to use full stop bracketing for transparency film. Correct if I am wrong, but when you process a given image, it can be developed within the range of its exposure latitude. This means that the range of "correct exposure" for transparency film is narrower than that for BW or color negative film.

It would seem to me then, that using 1 stop of bracketing in their direction would increase the range of correct exposure, whereas the 1/3 bracketing would keep the range of correct exposure limited.

I think I am missing something here with my logic otherwise why would most photographers say that 1/3 or 1/2 bracketing is necessary for transparency film?

Thanks.
- Laljit S. Sidhu

ANSWER 1:
Hi Laljit: You certainly raise some interesting points! And I'm saying this even though I've been shooting 35mm slide film for years ... and even though I continue to bracket in 1/2-stop increments!

Here's my reasoning: A slide and a negative are both pieces of film, but they really are not the same thing.
Actually, the best comparison here is between a slide (slide film's "final" product) and a print (negative film's "final" product).

For example, most negative-film photographers are verrrrry fussy about the "look" of their favorite photos: A print that's a little too dark isn't good enough, and a print that's a little too light isn't good enough either. "Just right" is what they're after ... thus, the "acceptable" light-to-dark range for a given print is really very narrow!

This goes for slides too: Like a print, a slide that's just a little too dark or one that's just a little too light will likely NOT be good enough. As a result, the "perfect" exposure - meaning "perfect" for me! - may be only a half-stop away from an exposure that's "not quite right." So it's possible that bracketing in one-full-stop increments may miss that "ideal" exposure entirely!

Interestingly, I don't just bracket for "insurance" - i.e., to make sure I get the right exposure in a tricky-exposure situation (say, backlighting). In some cases, I'll bracket because I'm not sure what "look" I'm after. For example, when I photograph storm-cloud scenes, heavy fog or twilight conditions, I may bracket to see whether I will prefer a lighter-toned slide (high-key for a "light" look) or a darker-toned slide (for a more "moody" look) ... or maybe even both! Bracketing in these situations enables me to compare ... and, once again, the "right" look may fall within a one-full-stop range.

I hope this makes sense, Laljit!

Kerry


- Kerry A. Drager

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ANSWER 2:
First, I apologize for the typographic errors in the initial question as I was rushed. Second, thanks for the prompt and informative response.

I think I understand the reasoning for the 1/2 and 1/3 bracketing of slides a little more given the context and source of the answer. Correct me if I am wrong, but for the advanced photographer, bracketing is used for greater artistic expression and even the subtlest of exposure adjustments can make a difference in the mood and style of the image. As the bracketing is not used for "insurance" it is not necessary to have broader and safer bracketing provided by 1 stop bracketing.

In contrast, for the novice photographer, bracketing serves more of an "insurance" and broader latitude provided by a 1 stop may be more appropriate.

Also, is the explanation in consideration of the fact as a professional photographer you are unlikely to have your work "corrected" by the lab? I have found that when I use only 1/3 bracketing, the final slides are identical as the lab has corrected the slides.

Am I understanding the concept of bracketing clearly or still off?

If I am correct, than does it mean that when bracketing is used for "insurance" purposes, it should be in 1 stop increments; whereas, if it is for artistic purposes and the lab is not going to make corrections, 1/2 or even 1/3 bracketing would be appropriate?

Thanks again for the informative response.
- Laljit S. Sidhu

ANSWER 3:
Hi again Liljit: Some more good questions! Hopefully I have some good answers!

- "Corrections" by the lab: Are you referring to the developing of the film, rather than the making of prints? If it's film developing only, then a roll of color slide film is always developed in one way; thus, nothing should be "corrected," since the development times for slide film are standard. There are some exceptions to this - i.e., if you mistakenly shoot at the wrong ISO, or if you wish to gain a stop or two of speed by using a higher ISO than the film's recommended ISO ... then you must inform the lab, so it can vary the development time for that roll to compensate for the ISO switch.

- My recommendation for slide-film "insurance" in tricky exposure situations is for 1/2-stop increments on both sides of what the photographer considers the "best" exposure. That would be up to about one stop in both directions (in 1/2 stop increments, for a total of two extra photos in each direction). If you aren't confident of your exposure, a one-full-stop increment is far better than nothing ... although that one-full-stop difference might miss the "perfect" exposure if it's at an in-between interval.

Unfortunately (for me), my Nikon F5 brackets in 1/3-stop increments ... and sometimes the difference of 1/3 is not very noticeable ... although a 2/3 difference DEFINITELY is noticeable. So, in tricky situations - AND in "artistic expression" situations - I'll go two or three exposures in each direction in 1/3 stops ... because that's the best choice for my camera. (If I could re-program my F5 to bracket in 1/2 stops, I would!)

- By the way, I have another "rule" when it comes to exposure, bracketing, and any other photographic technique: The BEST guide is always yourself! Thus, if a certain technique works for you - even if it is NOT the "recommended" approach - then go for it!!

Kerry


- Kerry A. Drager

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CONTINUING QUESTION 4: Taking Better 35mm Slides With Nikon F-100
Do you have a course that deals with the Nikon F-100 and the various settings and their use in taking great photos? In my first 6 months with the F-100, I have 90% great photos and 10% poor photos. This I find unacceptable. Which course will help me?
- Gordon R. Loomis

ANSWER 1:
Hi Gordon: A good question! Almost all of the issues, problems, creative shooting techniques, etc., apply to just about any camera - thus, there's not a specific course that deals only with a specific camera. So, once you know what a particular camera feature or setting does, it's easy to apply it to your own camera. In fact, most photography subjects apply to both film AND digital!!

BetterPhoto has an exciting - and ever-expanding array - of online courses. Here's a step-by-step approach to figuring out exactly which course might be right for you:

1) Take a look at every course title listed on BetterPhoto's home page, and then jot down the ones that sound most interesting to you.

2) Check the full course description for each class you're interested in. This should really help you narrow down the choices.

3) Consult the Course Outline and/or Questions and Answers for each class (there are links at the end of each course description) ... this will further trim your list of possibilities.

4) If you have any other questions relating to the course content, or to the skill level and/or equipment requirements, feel free to e-mail the instructor directly.

Good luck with your decision-making, Gordon!!
- Kerry A. Drager

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Visit Kerry Drager's Deluxe BetterPholio™ - KerryDrager.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Kerry Drager:
Beyond Snapshots
Field Techniques
Course Extension

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7319

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7319

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