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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Wednesday, December 17, 2003
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* SPOTLIGHT: Give the Gift of a Photography Course or Gallery
* BETTERPHOTO: Getting Close When Shooting Wide - Article by Kerry Drager
* BETTERPHOTO: Has Your Winter Photo Course Already Filled Up? Here's One Great Alternative
* BETTERPHOTO: Top Ten Tips for the Holidays
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Classics / Coffee Can
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Don't Stop Now... Keep Shooting! A Tip by Kerry Drager
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: EF-S Lens for Digital Rebel
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Lens Reversal Ring
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Film-Based - Infrared Film
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Shooting In Low Light
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Way to Downsize a File Without Making It Smaller?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: I Can See The Pixels In My Piictures
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Choosing the Right Lens
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: How to Give Running Water a Streaming Look
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Digital Photography
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 10: Old Photographs That Are Fading
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 11: Problem With Bright Splotches
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 12: Digital Cameras and ISO Settings
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Digital Slide Show Software


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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Many of you have been requesting a gift option this year - and why not? BetterPhoto online photography courses, Premium BetterPholios™, and Deluxe BetterPholios™ are all FANTASTIC gift ideas! We have now an easy way for you to give a meaningful and lasting gift to that special photographer in your life. A beautiful certificate will be mailed to you in a very special presentation. And we can even help you keep it a secret! Place your order for a certificate by Friday December 19th to ensure delivery before Christmas. To learn more, visit:
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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 139th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

We're back! We were very fortunate that the data recovery technicians were able to retreive the information and images that were on the site prior to "the big crash" we experienced last week.

Thanks to all of our Betterphoto members for the outpouring of patience and understanding during this trial. We received countless emails of support from our members - thank you! Your thoughts were very much appreciated.

A big thanks goes out to Patricia Kuniega, a Betterphoto member who emailed us a fun and creative poem, The Betterphoto Blues, that we wanted to share with you. Go to the following page to view Pat's great revision of Elvis' hit song "Heartbreak Hotel":
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7533

Regarding the November photo contest, the good news is that all of the photos survived. The bad news is that the crash put us behind. Hopefully the Novemember finalists and winners will be announced by Friday of this week.

We also wanted to announce that, over the next couple of weeks, we will be publishing a Holiday Extravaganza of tips, articles, and other helpful resources. We want to make this the best holiday season for you, photographically speaking. Get ready for a wealth of fun tips and exciting newsletters.

Have a great week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
Getting Close When Shooting Wide - Article by Kerry Drager
The wide-angle lens offers a unique visual perspective - the ability to combine nearby details with far-off views in a single picture - that makes it an amazing tool for outdoor photography. With a foreground-to-background approach, you can produce a dynamic "three-dimensional" effect that gives viewers a real sense of place. To read Kerry Drager's thoughts on this at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/article.asp?id=4

Or enroll in one of Kerry's fabulous online photography courses - "Beyond Snapshots", "Field Techniques", or his "Course Extension" at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD01.asp
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD02.asp
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD03.asp


*****
Has Your Winter Photo Course Already Filled Up? Here's One Great Alternative
To enhance the online course experience, Betterphoto is limiting enrollment. And they are filling up quickly! If you haven't already signed up for a course that peaks your interest, check our home page for openings. If a class you were interested in is already listed as full, we have many suggestions for compatible classes:

An alternative for Jim Miotke's "Beginning Photography" class, check out Jed Manwaring's "Getting Started: How to Make Great Photographs". Through great lessons and inspiring photos, Jed shares with you everything you need to begin making excellent pictures:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JED01.asp


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Top Ten Tips for the Holidays
In the spirit of the holiday season, we want to give you the BetterPhoto Top Ten Tips for Holiday Photographs. Each day, for the next ten days, we will post a new tip, counting down to the all-time best tip for Christmas, Hanukkah, or the mid-winter holiday of your preference. Use these tips this season to make great photos so you come away from the holidays with the absolute best photographs you've ever created. Visit the Web page below to see your first tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/topten/holiday-photography-tips.asp

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
In The Philadelphia Story, who plays the photographer?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Janet D. is:
Elizabeth (Liz) Imbrie was the photographer, played by Ruth Hussey. Ms. Hussey was also sometimes credited as Ruth March. She arrives on the scene with writer Mike Conner, played by Jimmy Stewart I believe.

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Coffee Can - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

What coffee company used Ansel Adams' photograph of Half Dome on their coffee can around 1968? How did Imogen Cunningham let Ansel know that she disapproved of this commercial use?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Don't Stop Now... Keep Shooting! A Tip by Kerry Drager
Whenever I find a photogenic scene that really motivates me, I work it every which way I can within whatever time constraints I have. That means trying different compositions, different focal lengths, or different lighting angles. But it also might mean trying different f/stops (in order to experiment with the depth of field - the range of sharpness in the scene) or different shutter speeds (in order to experiment with motion - by freezing the action or by showing a soft blur of movement).

Whenever possible, I'll even go back for seconds - maybe even thirds! Here's why I do it, and why you should, too: The act of shooting a subject, inspecting the results later (including AFTER the initial excitement of the shooting session has cooled down), and THEN returning for a re-shoot is a valuable way to develop your self-critiquing abilities... while ALSO improving your photographic vision.

To learn more about improving your photographic vision, take Kerry's photo course entitled "Beyond Snapshots" - everyone who takes a Kerry Drager course ends up loving his teaching style:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD01.asp

Or you can enroll in Kerry's equally excellent "Field Techniques" class to learn how to make the right decisions when you are out in the field:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD02.asp

If you have previously taken one of Kerry's classes, you will really enjoy his "Course Extension":
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KRD03.asp

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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To order online, visit:
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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: EF-S Lens for Digital Rebel
I just got the new Digital Rebel. However, I do not have the 18-50mm EF-S lens. (long story!) I know now that you can not buy it separately in any store (that I know of). Because of the conversion factor I need a lens starting around 18mm so that I have the wide angle option. Anyone know where I might find one? Secondly, if I use my zoom lens at 28mm, the conversion is equal to 44mm. Now, will I still get the distortion I would on a typical wide angel if I use it on portraits?
- Jen Hernandez

See Jen's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
I get my lenses from adoramacamera.com

They have good prices and I like the service.

You'll still get the distortion. It's just that in typical wide angle shots, the distortion is more pronounced on the edges. With digital cameras, people always say you have the tele-photo effect because of the smaller film area. But it's not a telephoto effect, it's really a cropping effect. Because the perspective is the same with film or digital, it's just that with digital, you just cut off part of the picture.

If you want the same kind of perspective that a 50mm would give, you still need a 50mm. It's just that with a digital, you'd have to back up to get the same area of view because the view finder and the ccd sensor is smaller than a 35mm film area.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Perhaps the retailer who sold you the camera will take it back in exchange for the kit with the EF-S?

Otherwise,
EF 16-35 f/2.8L USM ~$1380 (USA)
EF 17-40 f/4L USM ~$700
EF 20-35 f/3.5-4.5 USM ~$355
Sigma 12-24 f/4.5-5.6 EX DG ~$650
Sigma 15-30 f/3.5-4.5 EX DG ~$580
Sigma 17-35 f/2.8-4 EX ~$440
Sigma 18-50 f/3.5-5.6 DC and 55-200 f/4.5-5.6 DC ~$240 the pair (smaller image circle, not for EOS film or 1D bodies)
Tamron 17-35mm f/2.8-4 Di LD ~480

Re: barrel distortion - the lens won't perform any differently on a digital camera (the distortion will still be present), but it'll probably be less noticable since the image will be a crop from the center. Barrel/Pincushion distortion generally is worse at the edges of the 35mm frame than the center (same for sharpness).
- Jon Close

ANSWER 3:
Thank you both, Gregory and Jon! I would exchange the camera, but I bought it on Ebay and, well, I looked at so many and was more concerned that other the other parts and software were included that I forgot to double check that the lense was included. It wasn't stated very clearly, but still my fault. Still a smokin' deal! Thanks for the research Jon, pretty pricey for a Canadian. I will wait and see what Canon may offer in the future.

It sucks about the distortion, but I will give it a try anyways. I am dealing with an apartment size studio, very small.

If you hear of anyone not wanting their EF-S lens, let me know! Thanks again.
- Jen Hernandez

See Jen's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7523

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7523

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NEW QUESTION 2: Lens Reversal Ring
I have a SLR camera, Canon EOS 55(same as Elan IIe) with a canon lens(28-90mm lens of diameter 58mm). I know that if we reverse fit the lens, we can take some remarkable Macro photos. But I am not able to find the correct kind of adapter ring. I have tried to just hold it reverse and take a couple of photos. It has come out very well. But its very difficult to take the photos. If someone knows of any online shop, or any placein India or South korea, Pl. let me know. Thanks in Advance.
- Giridhar AN

ANSWER 1:
This technique is more versatile with makes other than EOS because the aperture can be controlled more simply. With EF lenses the aperture is controlled electronically, so with a simple reversal ring you can only shoot wide open. Novoflex makes a reversing system that attaches the lens reversed and provides electronic connections to the lens to enable the aperture, but it is quite expensive ($326.50 US at www.bhphotovideo.com). You'd be better money ahead just buying a true macro lens.

Otherwise a reversing ring for EOS is a DIY (Do It Yourself) project, using a hollowed out body cap or a discarded EF lens, a step-up ring or spare UV filter, and some glue.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
Thanks Mr. Jon C for the info. I think DIY project is what appears to be a reasonable solution for a ammeture like me. :)
- Giridhar AN

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7520

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7520

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*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Film-Based - Infrared Film
I've been reading about various types of film. I've only used slide film and negative film. But, recently I saw some photographs made with infrared film. They appear to be black and white. I don't ever recall seeing this film for sale anywhere (for example, B&H) and certainly not at local camera shops. Can anyone explain what infrared is, a time when it would be better to use it, and where to get it. Also, any special equipment necessary to make it effective.
Thanks a million.
- Cathy Sylvester

ANSWER 1:
HI Cathy:
B&H sells infrared film. With an 25 red or opaque filter, the film records light on the infrared spectrum. Just type in "infrared photography" in your search engine to see many illustrations of this film. Without one of the aforementioned filters, the images will look like regular black and white film.
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 2:
Thanks Tony. I have a red filter and have used it with regular b/w film. It appears to give better contrast when used and film is developed. I always tell my lab that I've used it. I'll try B&H and try the film, compare it to what I've done and see what differences there could be.
- Cathy Sylvester

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7514

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7514

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NEW QUESTION 4: Shooting In Low Light
Shooting a night or in low light my camera does not want to focus on the subject - so what am I doing wrong

ps - any good book out there to help me in this?
- Steven J. Mcnamara

ANSWER 1:
If you're using auto focus, the light may be insufficient for the camera sensor to see a subject upon which to focus.
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7513

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7513

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NEW QUESTION 5: Way to Downsize a File Without Making It Smaller?
My file size is huge and no matter what I do in Microsoft Digital Image Pro 9.0, I can not get the image file size down to 150mb. The images are scanned where scanned in by the lab at 6000X7400 dpi for some reason. I have to open the images in MS Paint and change it to 6000 X 7000 just to get the image pro program to open the file.
- Phil Ramey

ANSWER 1:
Try opening the file in Photoshop and then go right to Save As (without editing the file or doing anything to it). Save the file wherever you want and then Photoshop will let you choose the quality of the file ranging from 1 to 12. Try 10 or 9 or even 8, which still qualify as very high or high quality. Check the file size and retry until you are satisfied with the MB number.
- Ivan Munic

ANSWER 2:
I haven't used MS Paint, so I can't comment on exactly how to do much of anything, but it sure would help if the industry would agree on common terms for image manipulating operations. We use Photoshop terms, because even the $80 Elements 2 uses the same terms.

What has the lab scanned for you, 35mm negatives?

MS Paint must have some screen for setting Image Size. The total file size from this scan must be monstrous. It may also be in high bit color, which many imaging programs, including Elements 2, cannot handle. Ask the people doing your scans if they are in higher than 8-bit color. That may be why they won't open.

I suspect that scans like this are costing you an arm and a leg. Back the raw scans up to CD before you start messing with them. You will then have archival copies of the originals.

Then go to that Image Size page and tell it NOT to resample. Enter 150 ppi as your resolution and see what happens to the image's dimensions.

If they are unmanageable huge, tell it to Resample. You will be throwing away some pixels here, which is why I recommended you archive the original scans. Enter the dimensions you want.

Something else to consider- 150 ppi is a rather low input for true photo quality printing. For a scan that starts off this big, consider using 300 ppi as your print resolution, or, at least, 240 ppi.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7511

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7511

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: I Can See The Pixels In My Piictures
I am shooting with the Canon 10D. I have had wonderful luck in the past few months and all of my pictures have turned out great. The images are large and are brought in as jpegs. I burn the ones I like and on a CD and take them to a local lab for developing. All of which has worked perfect until now. I got a whole series of pictures back and the megapixels are showing in the faces of the portraits. First of all how or can I fix it and second how to I keep from doing this again?
- Gretchen D. Solomon

ANSWER 1:
If you're shooting for printing, you have an excellent camera. Just be sure you are setting a high enough quality level to keep this from happening. Try to isolate the problem that caused this, whether it was inadvertantly setting a wrong setting, overcompressing the JPEG's, or editing them too many times with too many Edits and Saves, thereby causing them to look as if they were made of LEGO blocks.

For the best possible image quality, have you tried shooting in raw mode and high bit color, doing the brightness/contrast/color correction in Photoshop and only then doing the switch to 8-bit and to TIF? JPEG is for sending and posting to the web, although some people get away with multiple edits and are getting decent prints.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7504

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7504

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Choosing the Right Lens
I just purchased the Canon EOS Digital camera, which comes w/ a basic 18-55mm lens. I am considering the purchase of a 28-300mm lens to keep from having to purchase two or three lenses.

As I'm sure you've guesses now, I am a novice at this. My question is: how much quality do you give up w/ a 20-300mm lens? Is it better to get several lens for different distances?
- Scott

ANSWER 1:
Reviews I've read of that 18-55 speak rather highly of it (Shutterbug). A 28-300 would duplicate some of what you already have, and add a lot on the telephoto end. Don't expect a zoom of this range to give you optical quality better than what you have. Every review or test I've read talk about barrel distortion at the wide end and pincushion distortion at the tele end of all these affordable super zooms. Consider, instead, a narrower range zoom (70-200) to cover the tele end. The multiplier effect of digital vs. film gives you a bonus in that a 70-200 becomes about a 100-300. You may find that you use tele focal lengths the least. A tele is a special purpose lens requiring some special technique. You must use faster shutter speeds and faster film as well. As it's difficult or impossible to hand hold long lenses in bad light, budget for a tripod, or, at least, a monopod.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Doug,
Just wanted to say thanks for the feedback on my question. I've been reading a great deal since the purchase of my digital camera, and it is starting to make more sense.
- Scott

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7491

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7491

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: How to Give Running Water a Streaming Look
Is it possible to use 100 ISO film during the day to give the running water of a stream a streaming look, instead of using ISO 25 or 50? The reason is I'm having a terrible time finding slower speed film under 100 ISO. Thank you.
- Jordan

ANSWER 1:
You talking about the white milky look water gets at slow speeds? If you are, one thing about that trick is there needs to be turbulence in the water for it to show up well. So if you have that, think about a different time of day because most of the pictures I've seen of this it shows better when it's shaded. The reflections off water in direct sunlight blend with it too much.
But if stopping all the way down still dosen't work for you, you can get a neutral density filter, or a polarizer can be used the same way.
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Yes it is very much so possible to get the veiling of water with an 100 ISO. The main thing you have to know is shooting this type of image on an overcast day and in deep shadow is the only way to go. If you shoot on a clear day with a blue sky you will not get as good of an image. Water will be all blue and not a very low shutter speed. I have found that shooting around an f/11 to an f/16 works the best. This should give you seconds for your shutter speed. The slower the more veiling you will have. Oh yea a polarizer is something I will not shoot with out. It will block glare on wet rocks plust make the scene darker for that low shutter speed. Hope this helps.
- Darren K. Fisher

See Darren's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
What Gregory said about shade being best is true. If you can shoot on a day with heavy cloud cover...even better.
Try to achieve a shutter speed of 1/4 second or slower for the best effect.
I've gone as slow as 1 second with 100 speed film on cloudy days.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
Thank you everyone for your responses. I will give it a shot. Might be a little hard today with all the snow we got and the sunshine reflecting, though.
- Jordan

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7471

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7471

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*****


NEW QUESTION 9: Digital Photography
I realize that asking a question about digital photography on a website is like asking a bear if he is hungry. However, virtually all of the people I see using digital are using it as a hobby. So, they have the time to manipulate the images, color balance, etc.

However, I do weddings. Clients more and more are asking for digital. I do not like digital. It is not ready for mass use. And, I do not have the time to manipulate 1,000+ images every single week, somtimes back to back.

Let's say I have two weddings a week for 6 months straight at 1,000+ images every wedding. For those who are slow at math, that's 2,000 images every week. That's massive volume. I either need a team of paid pro's sitting at computers all day, which I would not feel good about...computers and sitting are unnatural for humans and create all kinds of health and vision problems. Or, do it all myself - NO THANK YOU!

On top of that, I don't really think that clients want digital or film, they want images. How I "capture" them or deliver them should be up to me.

They can request a CD of the images, or something. But, for a client to request a medium seems odd to me. This is very new and inappropriate. But, what they hey. I can deal with the issue just fine.

Some pro's are using digital exclusely. They are working through the kinks. I prefer to wait until the kinks are worked out before I leap in that direction. I still think it's better than 10 years away.

Also, the technology is ramping up so fast, a camera purchased 2 years ago is practically obsolete. EVER WONDER WHY COMPANIES ARE PUSHING FOR THIS??? There is a high turnover in the digital market. I can buy a film camera and literally keep it for a lifetime. Digital, that will absolutely not be the case. It will be silly to use a 6 megapixel camera in 2020. That's like using a 3MB computer now. It's laughable.

I remember all too well the dot-com bomb. If you didn't have a dot-com, you were a schmuck. I see the same thing in digital photography. I also see the limitations digital has right now and wonder if those limitations will be fixed, or if that will be the end of it, and 20 years from now, we'll all be laughing about the "craze" of digital photography. Remember 8-Tracks, CB Radios, Hula-hoops, Beta, Dot-Com business?

I just read an article about a very successfull photographer moving to an all digital studio. She was discussing some of the pitfalls, like more time on the computer, which is what she was trying to aviod when she went into the photography business.

I too want to avoid massive computer use. I have a website, yes. I post here and elsewhere, yes. I order most equipment and film on-line, yes. But, it's not my job to do so. I could very easily replace all that with other things at virtually no cost or much change.

The problems as I understand them are:
Poor White Balance
Difficult Issues with flash
Cannot blow-up with quality clarity
More back-end work for the photographer
Speed is slower than film

The great parts are:
Immediate response (instant gratification)
Client thinks you're "with it"
Easily uploadable
Easily maniuplated images (good for low volume)
No Film!
No processing cost

Other than film and processing, which is still part of a professionals budget in the digital format, I do not see any advantages for the professional, at all!

For the average consumer, there are many great benefits. But, for those who deal in volume day in and day out, I just can't figure out what the hub-bub is all about.

Could someone please set me straight?
- Jerry Frazier

See Jerry's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Why do you need to be set straight? If you prefer film than use film. If you only want to use film for weddings, then show your client how your film pictures look. If they like them then what's the problem.
I don't see how flash and white balance are problems with digital, but there are plus and minuses to both sides.

1,000 photos for one wedding? You really need to take that much?
- Gregory La Grange

Visit gregorylagrange.org - Gregory's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Thanks for your response.

Well, it seems that many people are making the switch. But, I don't really understand why. I spoke to an associate of mine who did the switch, but she for her business, it works adequately. Although, she admitted that film is far superior, she didn't care. She's just making money. It's sad.

1,000 photos for a full-day wedding is appropriate and required. I take very little posed shots, which means I take mostly candids. This means I have to shoot more in order to make sure I capture the moment. Of course, this is transparent to the client.
- Jerry Frazier

See Jerry's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
For some of the problems that were listed about digital ie "Cannot blow-up with quality clarity" that is not true for all digital cameras. The EOS 1-Ds can go to 30*40 better than 35mm can. If you are to compare digital as it is right now against medium format, then your right. The only thing I see as a film user is good bulb duration without alot of noise. Digital has a future, a big one. It seems to me that 35mm will soon be at its limits in resolution and tonal changes. Digital still has a long way to go, but it will most certainly get there.

Thanks hope you don't hate me! : )
Ryan with a Pentax PZ-1p.
- Ryan Chai

ANSWER 4:
Thanks Ryan.

I would never hate anyone for voicing their opinion, especially when I ask for it.
- Jerry Frazier

See Jerry's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 5:
Jerry, I think you've talked yourself out of going digital right now. What's more, although I am not a pro, I agree with you. The time factor would eat me up, because I'd have to get it right.

What you might consider is getting a high-end flatbed scanner, especially if you're shooting medium format. Some of the newer Epson scanners are doing wonderful medium format scans. A good scan from a good scanner is high-bit color, giving you more flexibility in brightness/contrast, color balance issues. As we've said, though, you would never find the time to scan everything you shoot.

However, some fairly simple Photoshop operations can help you do tricks that might get you one up on the competition. A few are composites, using layers to do a double exposure effect, or simulated hand coloring, showing a sepia-tone image with only the bride's flowers, eyes, whatever, in color; or sheets of wallet-sizes, very easily and quickly done. I've been asked to remove the black sheep from more than one family photo. What's more, $79.95 Elements 2 will do a lot of this, and give you something to learn digital basics on.
- Doug Nelson

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NEW QUESTION 10: Old Photographs That Are Fading
My brother has OLD Family black/white
photos (Early 1900's) that are fading from the bottom up.?
Hanging on outside wall in cool fairly dark room.
How much would/could the cold affect the loss of image? Thank you.
- Beverly Joanne Hoover

ANSWER 1:
If you're asking me does cold temperature make photos fade quicker or why does a cold room seem to make pictures fade from the bottom up, I'm guessing that it might be an effect from humidity or moisture. I know many paper products are advised to be store in a cool, dry place. So maybe since they are hanging on an outside wall, that when the temp drops outside, that could cause a moisture build up that over time causes the photo to fade. And moist air is heavier than dry air, so gravity makes the bottom fade first.
But a photo from the 1900's, bound to have some signs of fading.
- Gregory La Grange

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ANSWER 2:
These photos can and should be restored. Find a retouch person in your area and shell out the bucks, OR buy Elements 2 or Paintshop Pro (or Photoshop for $600) and learn to do it yourself in a community college course. If you have it done, be sure you get a CD with a full-resolution image for each job; an ink-jet print is as likely to fade as a store-made photo. Your great-grandchildren will thank you for it.
- Doug Nelson

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NEW QUESTION 11: Problem With Bright Splotches
I hope this doesn't sound like too stupid of a question... but, I recently purchased a JVC gc-qx5hdu digital camera. When I shoot indoors, there are bright splotches on the subject. I am attaching an example. I am shooting on auto setting. Can anyone help?
- Julie A. Abston

See Sample Photo - Jake:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=240716

ANSWER 1:
Overexposure by the flash. You're too close to the subject for the auto-exposure to control the flash. Back up. If you want to take close-ups with flash then (if the camera allows) set a smaller aperture of f/8 to f/16, or (if the camera allows) dial in -1 or -2 flash exposure compensation when taking close-ups, or simply block/diffuse the flash light with a tissue.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
Thank you so much John! I knew there was probably a very easy solution, just wasn't sure what. I am very new to photography and have a lot to learn. I obviously need to take a course. Thanks again. I truly appreciate your response!
- Julie A. Abston

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NEW QUESTION 12: Digital Cameras and ISO Settings
What's the difference between low and high ISO settings? What would be an appropiate ISO setting for shooting an action shot at sunset with a minimum f stop of 5.6?
- Michael Rogers

ANSWER 1:
Hey Michael,
I would give ISO 400 a shot, but it really depends on how fast your subject is moving. The difference between low and high ISO settings on your digital camera is similar to film. More noise in digital more grain in film. The reason there is more grain/noise is the pixels become more sensitve to light by clustering them. You loose resolution by doing this but you can gain more freedom with your exposure. Some high end digital cameras like the EOS 1-Ds can have ISO 800 set and still enlarge the print to 16 x 20 without noticable problems.
- Ryan Chai

ANSWER 2:
Thanks Ryan.
- Michael Rogers

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Digital Slide Show Software
Any recommendations for software packages for putting on digital slide shows (with music)? Will be working with original digital images and scanned slides.

I know you can use PowerPoint but was told it really wasn't designed for this.

Thanks
- John Fleming

ANSWER 1:
FlipAlbum CD does this fairly well, the program is not expensive, and the company runs a good forum and Help page. Burn the slide show to a CD with your own CD software. Your recipient needs NO software to play it; he just pops it into his CD player and it self starts.The viewer has the option of letting the pages flip automatically as your music plays, or of seeing your images full screen by clicking on individual slides. The full screen images are better quality than the ones on the flipping pages. Adding commentary by means of text is ingeniously simple.
Your CD plays differently on each individual computer, so it's not possible to coordinate voice narration or songs with certain slides.
- Doug Nelson

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ANSWER 2:
I have FlipAlbum 5 Professional, and completely agree with Doug. It's a great program for slide shows, however it ran me about $150.00.

For about 30.00 you can download "Pic To Exe" and it also does a great job of creating a slide show with music. The difference is that it doesn't have any album pages or anything to "flip" it's just a slide show.

They're both great programs!
- Debra Weisheit

See Debra's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
A very nice and one of the best programs to produce digital slide shows is Pictures to Execute. It's very cheap and there is a realy good forum. Download the free trial and visit the forum. Examples of digital shows are on
http://www.beechbrook.com/pte/index.asp

You have also a livetime free update garantie.

Look at www.wnsoft.com or the forum at http://www.picturestoexe.com/forums/index.php
- Mike MDG

ANSWER 4:
I have used Easy CD Creator 5.0. The Photo Relay option lets you attach different audio to each individual picture or the entire slide show. It creates a self running slide show.You can acquire from scanner, files, camera, including web cam. You can also create a self running post card of MPEG files. That's besides the regular burning of data and MP3 files. You can also rip your CDs into MP3 files.
- William R. Throop

ANSWER 5:
"Pro Show" from Photodex Corporation -- www. photodex.com -- is a very versatile slide show program. I like best the feature which lets you do the programming three different ways including manual control so you can sync the photos with the music. It also has 170 transitions to choose from. It is cd, vcd, scvd capable.
- Rosemarie Culver

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