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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Wednesday, November 12, 2003
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* SPOTLIGHT: Sell Your Images Online With Our Deluxe BetterPholio™ Image Sales Option
* BETTERPHOTO: BetterPhoto Online PhotoCourses™ - Winter Session Begins January 7th
* BETTERPHOTO: Kathleen T. Carr Teaching Polaroid Transfers at BetterPhoto
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Digital Opinions / Dungeons & Dragons
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Improving on a Rainbow: Tip by Brenda Tharp
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: How to Shoot at Night
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Camera Settings for Waterfall *and* People Shot?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: International Library of Photography
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Pull or Push?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Photoshop...How To Start?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: Choosing the Right Tripod
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Studio Lighting for Digital Photography
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Digital Noise
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: Shooting at Night - Las Vegas
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Photo Printers


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
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Over 88% of all sales via the Web are done with a credit card. To accommodate this, we now offer an easy option which allows you to take such payments from customers who want to buy your photos. Our system works with PayPal and is streamlined to make the process as easy as it can possibly be. What's more, it costs very little - the price for this additional service is only an additional $60/year. That's only an extra $5 per month to sell your photos online.

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 136th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

The Betterphoto staff has been feverishly working at adding new classes and enhancing the site.

We are welcoming three new instructors - one of which we can tell you about today. Kathleen Carr is world famous as THE premier Polaroid image and emulsion transfer artist. She wrote the book on the subject. If you have ever wanted to try out this fun technique - or even if you have not yet heard of it - check out this course. It is a perfect activity for anyone wanting to have fun getting creative.

In addition to Kathleen's course on Polaroid transfer, we have posted about 20 other great courses... and a few more will be added as soon as we have all the material about them.

Enjoy the SnapShot and have a great week,
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
BetterPhoto Online PhotoCourses™ - Winter Session Begins January 7th
Would you like to learn more about photography? Are you struggling to gain a better understanding of the principles of exposure, composition, digital photography, photographic field techniques, or even Photoshop?

Join us for an inspiring online photo course at BetterPhoto.com. Let us be your guide... with our online courses, you will become a better photographer. Our Winter session of photography courses promises to fill those long winter days with creativity and inspiration.

For more information and a complete listing of the latest courses being offered, visit the BetterPhoto home page or:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp


*****
Kathleen T. Carr Teaching Polaroid Transfers at BetterPhoto
The BetterPhoto team would like to extend a warm welcome to Kathleen Carr - author of the classic handbook, "Polaroid Transfers: A Complete Visual Guide to Creating Image and Emulsion Transfers" and the recently released companion "Polaroid Manipulations: A Complete Visual Guide to Creating SX-70, Transfer, and Digital Prints" - to our team of extraordinary instructors at BetterPhoto.com. This coming January, Kathleen will be teaching an online photography course on Polaroid image and emulsion transfers. For more information on this creative class, please visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/KAT01.asp

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
What was Ansel's take on digital imaging?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotkeis:
He actually did get to play around with some of the first digital imaging software and thought highly of it.

See Jim's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=124

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Dungeons and Dragons - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

Kodak's early advertising often featured what kind of creature from folklore?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Improving on a Rainbow: Tip by Brenda Tharp
Did you know that polarizers, although designed to cut through glare and take the shine or sheen or shiny or wet objects, will make rainbows spectacular? It can also make them disappear, but you can see all of this through the viewfinder when the filter is turned. The next time you find yourself photographing rainbows, pull out that polarizer - you'll be really glad you did!

Buy Brenda's beautiful book, "Creative Nature and Outdoor Photography" or if you are already a fan, go write a brief review of Brenda's book at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/reviews/reviewItemDetail.asp?reviewItemID=1882

Or you can take Brenda's excellent courses right here at BetterPhoto.com:

Enroll in "Creating Visual Impact" to learn how to design creative and expressive images:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BRN01.asp

Enroll in "Beyond the Postcard" to learn how to create great travel photos - everywhere you go:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/BRN02.asp

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: How to Shoot at Night
I've been trying my hand at night photography. It's been hit or miss either they come out over or under exposed. Is there any formula I can use?

I'm shooting with a manual camera (Richo) using a 28 to 105 lens 2.8 using the bulb setting. Can anyone there help me Pleasssssse?
- Gerie Jones

See Sample Photo - new york city at night:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=218062

ANSWER 1:
Gerie,

Hello. I too have been frustrated by this in the past. I have a lot of slides that look really bad because I didn't meter off the right spot. If you have artificial light in the center of your frame and you set your exposure off that spot then things get crazy. I have to thank Bryan Peterson for explaining how to do this in his book Understanding Exposure. For the attached image I set my lens wide open at f/2.8 and took a reading off the area I indicated in the sky... please excuse the crop and bad graphics on where to meter. My Photoshop skills are terrible. My meter indicated I needed an 8 sec exposure at f/2.8. Since I wanted to capture the movement in the traffic I increased the exposure by three stops to one minute and stopped down the aperture three stops from f/2.8 to f/8. I am sure there are situations where this won't work, but it has served me well. Also, if you have a camera with matrix metering such as a Nikon F system then turn it off and use center metering. The matrix meter assumes you are going to use a fill flash in the dark. I know this image has been done about a million times, but every photographer has to do this one themselves. :)
- Chris L. Hurtt

See Chris's Premium BetterPholio™

See Sample Photo - Where to meter:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=218946

ANSWER 2:
Here is the rest of the image.
- Chris L. Hurtt

See Chris's Premium BetterPholio™

See Sample Photo - Golden Gate:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=218959

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7196

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7196

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NEW QUESTION 2: Camera Settings for Waterfall *and* People Shot?
I decided I would like to try to use a local waterfall as the backdrop for my Christmas photo cards this year. Besides the waterfall, I intend to pose my 2 children (ages 5 and 9) on a grouping of rocks that are in front of falls (there's approximately 20-25 feet of space between the rocks and the waterfall).

What shutter speed and aperatures would you recommend? I want to try both views of the falls: the "bridal veil" look and "stop action" look. At the same time, I want the kids to be in good clear/crisp focus. Am I asking/expecting too much?

I intend to go out to the falls alone with a big teddy bear prop (don't laugh!) ahead of time to get the camera set up without the kids. That way, I'll keep my kids' time being bored with me taking their picture to a minimum.

I plan to use my Canon G3 to do this, so my hightest aperature setting is 8.0 and the lowest is 2.0 (I think...don't have it here in front of me). I have a maximum shutter speed of 1/2000.

Can't wait to hear what some of you have to recommend.
- Joy Fender

ANSWER 1:
Hi Joy,

Your proposed cards sound like a great idea. What you are hoping to achieve is quite possible if you have manual control capabilities on your camera. Since I am unfamiliar with the Canon G3, I cannot advise you on specific settings. I can, however, provide you with some of the technical data you will need to understand.

The human eye sees motion at around 1/60 second. Any speed slower than that will cause the water to blur. Obviously,...the longer you expose the scene, the more pronounced the effect. Your shutter speed setting should be based upon the available light, and your desired effect. I've used speeds from 1/8 second to 1 second most frequently for large falls on cloudy days. (It is important to shoot the motion shots on overcast days to allow for the longer exposure times and to avoid over-exposing the bright areas of the falls....And, don't forget the tripod!)

To freeze the action of the falls, 1/125 or higher is recommended.

It's a good idea to take the test shots first, and examine the effects before you include your kids in the foreground.

Hope this helps.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Thanks Bob! Yes, that's exactly the type of information I was looking for. My G3 does have manual controls. I will probably set the TV mode to various shutter speeds and let camera choose the aperature until I get the effect I'm looking for.

Now that I've seen your explanation, I feel the "bridal veil" effect may not be a reasonable thing to try to achieve as my children may not cooperate and sit still long enough for those extended length shutter speeds. That's precisely what I was wondering about.

The area where these falls are located is very wooded and even on a sunny day is quite shaded (even now in the late fall). Thanks for the info regarding how a cloudy day will work to my advantage.
- Joy Fender

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7184

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7184

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*****


NEW QUESTION 3: International Library of Photography
I recieved a letter yesterday from the International Library of Photography telling me that a photo I submitted in July was chosen as a semifinalist. I, of course was estatic but not so much after I read all of these comments. I personally think my photograph is very good and I think I would buy the book if it was in it. My artisits proof states that the picture is copyrighted by me. Has anyone any experience with these people selling their picture without their knowledge? Also I was thinking I would wait until this book - Endless Journeys is published and then buy it of Amazon. Does anyone have any experience with doing it this way? Is the book worth it? Are their any good contests out there?
- Cathy LH

ANSWER 1:
Unfortunately, Cathy, one must read the very fine print before sending their work into a "cattle call" photo contest. You didn't make it clear, but it appears like they're trying to get you to buy a book, by baiting you with some flattery. First off, look at these contests with a cynical eye. On many occasions, the only party who benefits from these things is the contest organizer. Secondly, if your work is to be published in a book, the very least you should get is a photo credit and a copy of the book, a FREE copy. Also, most of these contest reserve the right to publish your work in many venues without payment to you. Some even want you to surrender rights to the contest. In that case, it is as if they shot the image (not you, they own it), and you have no recourse whatsoever, and no subsequent income. Photo contests can be a fun and exciting venue, but only when the photographer retains the rights to the work and the work is shown in a representative venue. Any kind of book involvement is a serious matter and involves a contract and negotiations. Keep you eyes peeled for scams to get free calendar or book imagery.

Good luck!
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 2:
Also, there is a lengthy discussion of this subject at this previous Q&A thread
- Jim at BetterPhoto.com

See Jim Miotke's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Jim Miotke's Deluxe BetterPholio™ - Miotke.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Jim Miotke:
Jim Miotke's Online Photography Classes

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7174

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7174

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Pull or Push?
I just bought some Kodak 100Tmax, and I was researching the different processing methods. I am new to photography. What is push/pull processing? What does it do to the picture. Is it how they change a under/over exposed picture.

Thanks for any help.
- Ryan Chai

ANSWER 1:
Pushing film is simply using the film at a different speed than what it was intended. For example, shooting ISO 100 film at ISO 400. This enables one to get an exposure on an image at a normally unusable light situation, by making the film more sensitive to light. All films don't push well, Fuji transparency films do. The result is a bit more grain, more contrast, and not razor sharp images. But, when caught in a situation where you have the wrong film or don't have the film one would need, pushing can save the day.

Pulling film is the oppposite where film is rated at, for example, ISO100 and shot at ISO50. This occurs mostly by mistake and, when one changes film and forgets to reset the ISO. I can think of no practical reason to pull film, although there are probably some reasons that I'm unaware of.
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7172

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7172

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Photoshop...How To Start?
Hi,

I am a 35mm film user, not a digital gal. I have recently purchased a film scanner and Photoshop 6.0. I do have Photoshop Elements as well. I know very little about either. I can not afford a course on line at this point and I purchased a book called Photoshop Flash Point. It all seems like Spanish and a tad overwhelming. I am not even sure where to start. Can anyone give me suggestions as the easiest way to begin with all of this?
- Dede Carver

ANSWER 1:
Dede, you need a begining photoshop course. Don't waste your time/money on a book at this point. It will be overwhelming. Jim Miotke's "Photoshop for Photographers" could fit the bill for you. If it seems too advanced, then check into your local community colleges for a beginning photoshop class. There are not short cuts or secret passage ways to learning photoshop. You'll need several classes and you'll have to put in a lot of time.
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 2:
I didnt learn how to use Adobe from a book or a class. You just have to take the time to experiment and if you have any questions, visit the adobe website and you can find answers to all your questions. Trust me, EXPERIMENT!!
- Sarah R. Gipson

ANSWER 3:
Thanks Tony for taking the time to respond. I feel like I am stuck in this situation, however. Justifying the cost of Jim's class to my husband will be impossible. (I've already taken two other courses from BetterPhoto and his class is significant $$.) I LOVE the classes I have taken, but it's a big commitment time wise when you're in the classes and to get the most out it I feel like I need to stay on track weekly - not just throwing assignments together in hurry so I can hand something in on time and be ready for next week. This is difficult with 4 kids involved in sports and other activities. There is something nearly every night with someone, leaving little time to REALLY concentrate on assignments. For that kind of $, I need the time to do it right. (Ironically, my kids are the subjects I shoot the most and their pix are the ones I am dying to tinker with in photoshop.)

The nearest community college isn't very near and what they do have to offer is not accomadating to the working 9-5 world. I am sounding very negative I know, but this is why I wrote to the QA. I was hoping that someone would have an answer other than the obvious. I don't expect to learn it over night as I've already owned the program for months and it scares me/overwhelms me to death everytime I open it. What about tutorial CD's or anything comparable? Is there such a thing? UGHHH. How frustrating! I can't possibly be the only one out there with these same frustrations.....can I?
- Dede Carver

ANSWER 4:
Of course you're not the only one in your situation. And it is absolutely frustrating.

But, consider that if you buy a set of cd's and a book, it's almost the cost of a Betterphoto class or a comm. college class, if not MORE.

Another option could be to search online for photoshop bulletin boards or chat rooms. They are free (mostly) and you could find some specific answers to your questions and/problems there, but it is STILL time consuming.

As a aside, I know very little about photoshop. I know how to do my routine specific to my image adjustments and scanning and that's it. No one knows the whole program. It's vast. Why don't you give some thought to exactly what you want to do with photoshop, first. If you just want to put cool borders around your kid's pictures, that's easy.

You have to have an idea of what you want to accomplish before you even know what questions to ask, right?
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 5:
Check out the For Sale books at your library. Old versions of Photoshop books are still useful for the basics. Such books as Photoshop for the Complete Idiot, etc, are actually useful.

Learn to do basic photo adjustments such as Levels first, learn to select a part of the image to work on. It's a bit daunting, but take it a step at a time.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7171

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7171

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: Choosing the Right Tripod
What do you think is a good all around choice for a tripod/tripod head combination that will work well for backpacking, landscape/travel and portrait work? I currently use a Manfrotto with a 2-way head and have found this limiting on many occasions. Thanks!
- Eric Gustafson

ANSWER 1:
Eric:

Consider the Gitzo mountaineering tripods:

gitzo.com then go the "product" link.

You will also want to go to a ball style head. I imagine your 2-way is driving you a bit nuts at times! Consider the Kirk BH-3 which is small, but appropriate for lighter lenses and smaller tripods: kirkphoto.com .

Good luck!
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 2:
Thanks Tony. Gitzo/Kirk combo seems to be the hot item - I'll give it a try.
- Eric Gustafson

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7091

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7091

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Studio Lighting for Digital Photography
I've just bought my first digital camera (canon EOS digital rebel) last week and did a test shoot in a studio setting. I set my lights as usual, using a flash meter...., and all my shots came out underexposed. They are not just a slightly underexposed but REALLY DARK! What did I do wrong? I tried increasing the amount of light and opening the aperture as much as I could, and I even brought ISO up to 1600, but still shots look far too dark. Then I used the on-camera flash instead of studio lights, and the shot was properly exposed. I just don't understand why this little on-camera flash can light my subject and two studio lights can't. Is there some trick for studio lighting for a digital camera that I don't know about or do I have to go out and buy more powerful light? I hope I don't. Would you please help me?
- Nami Sakamoto

See Nami's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Nami,

Have you checked your camera manual to see if the Rebel has a pre-flash? Check for any info on using the on-camera flash as a trigger for studio lights. I know I have to switch my D100 over to manual flash instead of TTL auto so that the flash can trigger the studio strobes correctly. Also, are you sure your strobes even flashed when you did the shots above? Are you using a PC sync connection from your camera to your strobes, or are you using an infrared remote trigger? Sounds to me like your strobes did not trip at all, and you were only capturing the ambient light in these shots. Also make sure you've dialed in the correct sync speed and ISO into the meter before you take your readings.

Hope this helps some.
- Piper Lehman

See Piper's Premium BetterPholio™

Visit pipershots.com - Piper's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Thank you for your thoughtful advice, Piper. I've found my problem by an accident. I was using my on-camera flash as a trigger for all studio lights (main, fill, back ground, and hair), and yes, they were going off everytime. But the trick was that the closest flash to the on-camera flash which was catching the signal from the on-camera flash and sending to the rest of lights (and also it was made by the different company from the rest of lights)was going off either too slow or too fast for my new digital camera's shutter opening, and the camera ended up with no light recorded in the shot. It took me a while to figured out, but when I switched the lights around, images are properly exposed every shots. I'm not sure if I'm explaining this right since I'm not too bright on electronic stuff, but it works now. Thank goodness.
- Nami Sakamoto

See Nami's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7089

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7089

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: Digital Noise
I was reading about digital cameras in a discussion forum and I came across the term "noise". There were a few complaints about the camera which I own and use exclusively, the Olympus E-10. They complained that the E-10 had digital noise. What is digital noise? Am I blind? My photos look great if I compose the shot correctly, and use the available lighting or flash correctly. What does noise look like? The camera is idiot proof.
- Richard A. Ackerman

ANSWER 1:
OK, I'm a novice in the digital world having just bought a Canon G3, but noise, as it's been simply defined to me, it very similar to grain on high speed film. Some of the compact point-and-shoot type digitals have more problems with 'noise' than the SLR digital cameras. This means that your pictures may look grainier than you want even if you made them using an ISO of 50 or 100. But one thing I have noticed is that some of those reviews are very picky about any noise at all, so the bottom line is that if your pictures look great, I wouldn't worry about it too much. Also, there is a product out there, call 'dfine' that is a noise-reduction software; I've been hearing great things about it, so if noise does become an issue at some point, you might want to check into that program. Good luck, hope this helps!
- Brenda Tharp

See Brenda Tharp's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Brenda Tharp's Web Site - BrendaTharp.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Brenda Tharp:
Creating Visual Impact
Beyond the Postcard: Travel Photography

ANSWER 2:
I have an E-20 and have read the same thing about its noise profile, but have yet to see a problem. Brenda is right about the reviewers being picky - the reviewers are looking for noise in the pictures in order to compare cameras. While camera "A" may have noisier images than camera "B", in the real-world it may not make a bit of difference. I set my E-20 to ISO 50; I have noticed that if I increase the ISO, the images get noticeably grainer.
- Tim Devick

ANSWER 3:
Brenda and Tim, thank you both for responding to my questions about noise. I have followed the instruction manual and I have left the ISO setting on AUTO. Auto selects the proper ISO and it seems to work well. Perhaps this is why I have never noticed the appearence of grain in my photos. Now I just re-read the manual, I have never taken a photo of a dark subect so as to need the increase in ISO setting. Thank you both again!
- Richard A. Ackerman

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7085

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7085

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*****


NEW QUESTION 9: Shooting at Night - Las Vegas
Any suggestion for shooting pictures at night with all the lights in Las Vegas? I have a Minolta Maxxum 7. This is our first time to Vegas and I won't be able to experiment with shutter speed and f-stops and then re-shoot if it doesn't look right. I would like to get it right so I'll have some good shoots to bring home. What about film speed? Flash? Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you.
- Susan K. Stephens

ANSWER 1:
You have a very good camera. All you need is a wide angle lens (28mm would do) or a zoom with wide angel capability, a tripod and a remote shutter release.

Here's what I would do. Set your camera to Av mode (aperture priority and use at least f8 or f11 for maximum depth-of-field) and trust your camera's Honeycomb-pattern or Center-weighted meter. I always take one more picture with +1 exposure compensation. There is one exception. If the light source is changing, you may need to adjust the exposure compensation accordingly. Let me show you with the photos I took in my first (and only) trip to LV. All the photos were taken with my manual Canon AT-1 with 28mm lens, starting at f8 with 8 seconds and bracket from there.

The first two were pretty much the same exposure except the the first one I use a flash to light up the rail in the foreground so it won't be totall dark. The third one I was anticipating the "eruption" of the volcano and the "lava" flow on the water will add at least one stop of light. So I set up before the volcano erupt with 1 stop underexposure. I waited for the volcano started to erupt and click my shutter.

Bracket and try to fill the frame with the subject (do not include a lot of black sky).

Hope this helps.
- Andy Szeto

See Sample Photo - Mirage:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=207796

See Sample Photo - Luxor:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=207795

See Sample Photo - The Strip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=207794

ANSWER 2:
Hi Susan,

Andy's comments are great, and will yield many fine photos.

I was in Vegas a while back and photographed the Mirage's volcano. (see attached) If you have a slow film and multi-exposure capability on your camera....try this:

Arrive early to learn the actual time between eruptions, and to secure a good position. As darkness approaches, expose the surrounding terrain with a time exposure of several seconds...starting when the water first begins to "flow" from the mountain. Then, cock the shutter without winding the film and wait for the "big finale",..when the brightest light is erupting, and expose the film again for @ 1/2 second.(Don't move the camera or tripod between exposures,)

Hopefully, you will get all the action recorded.

Good luck.
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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Photo Printers
I'd love to have a photo printer, but don't know where to start, so I thought I'd go to my new-found friends at BetterPhoto and ask for your advice.

My daughter and I have a very enjoyable small business doing outdoor family pix, children's candids, family reunions, a few weddings, etc. We let the photo lab do the printing and enlargements that people request, but I'd like to dip my toe into some of the editing for photos of my family, landscapes, etc.

I'm not happy with most of the prints I get from my HP all-in-one. I'd like the prints to last, so do I need to have a printer that uses special archival inks and papers? Thanks for your help.

Here is what I have to work with: a 3 megapixel Olympus digital, a nice Minolta SLR--I order the prints on CD when I have my film processed, and Photoshop Elements 2--having fun learning this!

If you have suggestions, please include the brand, model number and price. Thanks.
- Charlyce Altom

ANSWER 1:
Hi Charlyce:

Hands down! My recommendation is the Epson 2200 for about $700. It may sound like a good piece of change, but if it's your business, no matter how small, quality, speed, ease of use, and maintenace should be of paramount importance. This printer has it all. Every pro I know has one.

Good luck!
- Tony Sweet

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ANSWER 2:
Tony, for those of us who can't afford to spend $700 on a printer right now, what Epson or other brand do you recommend? How about a list of printers in order of their 'greatness'!

Would you stick with Epson all the way, or do you think HP has one in there somewhere? I like the roll-paper feature of the 2200, but it's not my number one priority. Getting a professional color print is #1.
- Piper Lehman

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ANSWER 3:
Hi Piper,

A professional level printer, although quite inexpensive by conventional standards, costs some bucks to most people. The 2200 is what every pro, that I know of, uses.

You can also look for refurbished 1270 and 1280 Epson printers, which are outstanding. Try calling Epson to find out where refurbs are available.

Good luck!
- Tony Sweet

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Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 4:
I have been using an Epson 890 for about 3 years. I think that the price has come down to about $300. It does beautiful borderless photos. It is the same as an Epson 1280 except that the max width is 8 1/2. It can accomodate roll paper, though I have not found a good way to uncurl this paper after printing. I buy 4x6, 5x7 and 8x10 premium glossy photo paper from Epson online. There shipping is a flat $1.50 and there is no state sales tax to my area. Sorry if this sounds like a commercial, but I print many photos and like this printer. Another thought is that the key to good prints is the right paper that matches one of your driver settings. Hope this helps.
- Mary Binford

ANSWER 5:
I noticed the Epson 2200 only makes prints 13" x 44". What if you want to go bigger than the 13" size? Do you send out the work then? What lab do you recommend?
- Holly Higbee-Jansen

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ANSWER 6:
I agree with Tony. If you can swing it at all, go with the Epson 2200. I'm so glad I did. The inks are lightfast up to 100 years, and you can purchase papers other than Epson, that work beautifully with this printer, and I've found the Epson ink cartridges at a great price online at www.galleryprint.com. I do a lot of fine art photography which is shown in galleries... this printer is fantastic.
- Shirley Cross

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ANSWER 7:
Ink Jet lays on the surface of a piece of paper. Burn your images to a CD and go to a local lab, Target, or a pro lab and use emulsion paper that goes thru regular developing chemistry.

Protect your images with Shurgard lacquer spray by McDonalds. Ink is expensive on ink jet printers and the makers know that. You'll never re-coupe your investment in an expensive ink jet. Should you insist on a printer for your home use, consider the Kodak 8500. It uses a subligmation process that make a print that is virtually impossible to tear in half and the detail and color is fantastic ($1,000 and $1.75 average cost per 8X10 sheet).

Good Luck!
- Gregg Vieregge

ANSWER 8:
Without trying to plug a specific seller: There are some mailorder outfits like mwave.com that sell the Epson 2200 for $589, and Epson 1280 for $380.
- Alan

ANSWER 9:
Hello:

Hopefully this information is found useful. I discussed questions and concerns about prints and printers with an Epson representative. I was told, that, the Epson inkjet 820 and the older 1270 have the same "guts" inside.

The down side is this printer can only print 8x10 size. However, it sells for approximately 80 dollars.

While I don't have the experience others have that have addressed this question, I've had nothing but great pics and results.
- Peter A. Gonzalez

ANSWER 10:
For those looking for "low-end" quality, I have been delighted with the performance of my Epson C82, especially using Epson double-sided Matte paper. It's far ahead of any other inkjet that I have owned. I am strictly an amateur, printing 8x10's, and smaller,ranging from closeups to landscapes. All print beautifully. I use a Pentax 330GS camera - nothing fancy.
- Betty

ANSWER 11:
Canon has a new model the 950 that looks good by the review I read in Shutterbug magazine also its quite resonable!!!
- Michael McCullough

ANSWER 12:
Thanks, friends! It's great to know I have such a resource. I'm looking into all the printers mentioned, as well as the great suggestion to learn how to save to CD and have a lab do the printing. I'll keep you updated on my progress--maybe someone else can learn from my experiences. I really do appreciate you taking the time to respond to my question.
- Charlyce Altom

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http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6932

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http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6932

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