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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Monday, October 20, 2003
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* SPOTLIGHT: Got Great Photos? Show Them Off with a Deluxe BetterPholio™
* BETTERPHOTO: View the Beautiful Winning Photos of the September Contest
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Change in Plans / Digital Opinions
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Using Depth of Field Buttons and Charts: Tip by Brenda Tharp
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: How Many Pixels Will I Need?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: What is Hyperfocal?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Deleting Photos From My Gallery
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Lens Selection
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: How to Shoot In Snow
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: First Digital Camera
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Comparing Od Pentax K1000 to the ZX-M
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: Extension Tubes
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Photo Printers
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: How to Resize a Digital Photo for Lab Printing


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 135th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

We have an assortment of amazing contest winning photos for you to browse. The September contest had so many wonderful photos, it was both a treat to view and a challenge to judge. We hope you enjoy viewing the winners and finalists as much as we do.

You will also get a kick out of the great Q&A we have collected this week, as well as an excellent photo tip from Brenda Tharp. You can learn about everything from hyperfocal distance to lens selection to picking the best printer.

Enjoy the SnapShot and have a great week,
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
View the Beautiful Winning Photos of the September Contest
We had so many incredibly well-done photos in the finalists this month! It was a treat for the judging panel to repeatedly examine each of these gorgeous photos as they selected the 56 winning photos. These award-winning photographs will knock your socks off.

A big hearty congratulations to Doug Benner for his cool Grand Prize winning photo from the General category. Doug opted to join an online photography course... Tony Sweet's "Image Design: Revealing Your Personal Vision". Welcome aboard, Doug.

Congratulations are also due to Bob Jones, Vien Nguyen-vu, Betsy Zibas, Gaizka Gorostiaga Ispizua, and Randy Myers for their awesome First Place winning images, as well as to all of the fantastic winners and finalists. For a real treat, browse the winning photos and the 310 contest finalists today:
http://www.betterphoto.com/contest/winners/0309.asp

View all of the beautiful contest finalists at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=2138

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
What did Ansel Adams want to be when he grew up, before discovering the art of photography? [And which BetterPhoto instructor experienced a similar change in plans?]

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Margreet Faccinis:
Ansel Adams wanted to become a pianist. If the question in brackets is part of the question, the answer is Tony Sweet, who played jazz.

See Margreet's Premium BetterPholio™:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/dynoMG.asp?memberID=48042

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Digital Opinions - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

What was Ansel's take on digital imaging?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Using Depth of Field Buttons and Charts: Tip by Brenda Tharp
These days, many zoom lenses and even some of the fixed lenses you buy no longer have the hyperfocal settings to help you set up the maximum depth of field that you want. Using the hyperfocal theory, you can still focus about one-third of the way into the scene, and use your depth of field preview button to verify what will be sharp in the scene. It's dark in there - so if you pull your jacket or sweater, or a dark towel over your head, your eye's pupil will adjust for the light and you'll be able to see what's sharp.

Another easy method is to use a depth of field/hyperfocal chart. These handy charts are in every camera bag I own - and I use them regularly. I've photocopied one out of Outdoor Photographer (an old George Lepp column) and laminated it. While I still use my depth of field button to verify things look good, the charts are a quick way to set up the 'correct' focus point for getting the most focus depth possible in your scene. I rely on these when working on landscapes/scenics.

Visit the page below for a few depth of field charts that BetterPhoto member John Lind uploaded a while back:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=583

Buy Brenda's unbelievably beautiful book, "Creative Nature and Outdoor Photography" from Amazon.com via the following Web page. Or if you are already a fan, go write a brief review of Brenda's great book:
http://www.betterphoto.com/reviews/reviewItemDetail.asp?reviewItemID=1882

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: How Many Pixels Will I Need?
I have a Pentax Optio with 4 million megapixels. Would this give me a good result for a photo 8x10?
- Allan Fulcher

ANSWER 1:
Look at the pixel length of the best resolution this camera can do. See your manual for this. If it's 2400 pixels, or even a tad less, you're good to go. Most inkjet printers these days require 240 pixels per inch input to give true photo quality. When you want the very best image quality on this Optio, shoot in the TIF mode. A review I read in a computer mag said the Optio 4 megapixel model they reviewed could shoot in TIF. When you do that, you need to buy more storage cards of great capacity than the one that came with the camera. When you must have the very best image, this is the way to go.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7065

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7065

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*****


NEW QUESTION 2: What is Hyperfocal?
I would like to now how too shoot hyperfocal. I'm having trouble keeping everything in focus in landscapes.
- James Gregus

See James's Premium BetterPholio™

See Sample Photo - Sunny Path:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=205967

See Sample Photo - Two Birch Trees:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=205965

ANSWER 1:
James, quite simply, and avoiding the physics explanation, hyperfocal is a function of wide angle lenses. First off, you need a "near-far" relationship... something close and something far away. Set your lens at f/22 and focus 1/3 third into the film plane, NOT the scene. In other words, focus at the 1/3 point in the frame. Make sense?
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 2:
Hyperfocal is the nearest distance at which infinity falls within the depth of focus. When the lens is focused to the hyperfocal distance, depth of field will extend from about 1/2 that distance to infinity. It is a function of lens focal length, the aperture set, and the minimum "circle of confusion." The circle of confusion will vary by the size of the film format used, generall accepted as .025mm for 35mm film.

The formula for determining the hyperfocal distance is f^2/(F x d), where f^2 is the focal length squared, F is the aperture number, and d is the circle of confusion.

Examples:
The hyperfocal distance for 24mm lens and f/8 is 24mm^2/(8 x .025mm) = 2880mm or 2.88m (about 9.4 feet). Depth of field will be from about 4.7 ft to infinity.

For 50mm and f/16 the hyperfocal distance is 6.25 m (~20.5 ft).
- Jon Close

ANSWER 3:
Thanks to Tony Sweet & Jon Close for your information on hyperfocal distance. I'll try what you said and see how it works.
- James Gregus

See James's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 4:
James,
While you've been given some heuristics, and Jon has presented some of the math surrounding hyperfocal distance, it's still not quite that simple. Reason? The circle of confusion diameter is derived from several factors: print size, print viewing distance (or projection size and projection viewing distance for slides) and generally accepted acuity of the human eye.

IOW, depth of field is based on human perception. The *only* distance completely in focus in a photograph is the focus distance you set the lens for (critical focus). Something must be sufficiently out of focus before it will appear to be to the unaided human eye.

I am pleased to see Jon is using the tighter 25/1000ths mm for CoC diameter. It will likely lead to less trouble. Some depth of field models use looser values (as large as 0.033mm). The caution here is to understand that the larger you make the print and closer you view it, the more the apparent depth of field shrinks. What appears to be OK in a 4x6 print may be disappointing in an 8x10 or 11x14 size print . . . and I have seen 8x10's that were obviously done using a "hyperfocal distance" based on smaller print size.

I won't go into the equations here (too much and too many), but will walk through the concept:
1. The *average* human acuity is about one arc-minute (1/60th degree). Remember the *average* means 50% of the population has slightly *greater* acuity.
2. Establish print size and viewing distance.
3. Using trigonometry, average acuity, and viewing distance, calculate the maximum diameter of a dot that is on the verge of being discerned as such, and not a point (the acuity angle).
4. Find the enlargement ratio from film to print (or projection) by dividing the print (projection) size by the film dimensions (35mm film frame is 24mm x 36mm). You will likely have to find the enlargement ratio by doing the math for both dimensions. Use the largest of the two.
5. Divide the largest allowable diameter "dot" on the print (or projection) by the enlargement ratio. This is the CoC to use in the equation Jon gave . . . the largest acceptable circle of confusion diamter on the film.

Remember to keep units of measure the *same*. I convert everything to millimeters before grinding out the numbers. Also remember when doing the trig you are working with a diameter, not a radius.
- John A. Lind

See John's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 5:
Hi James,

I also wanted to point out a few helpful depth of field charts that John Lind uploaded a while back:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=583
- Jim at BetterPhoto.com

See Jim Miotke's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Jim Miotke's Deluxe BetterPholio™ - Miotke.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Jim Miotke:
Jim Miotke's Online Photography Classes

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7062

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7062

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*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Deleting Photos From My Gallery
On going thru my gallery, I notice that I have a couple of picyures that I somehow uploaded more than once? How do I elinminate or remove those extra pictures. Also, what is the limited number of pictures that I can present in my Gallery?
- Allan L. Whitehead

See Allan's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Hi Allan,
To delete extra photos in your Premium BetterPholio™, simply click on the "Delete Altogether" option (in Your Selected Premium BetterPholio™ Photos section of your Admin center). Note that this will remove the photo completely from our BetterPhoto servers.

You are allowed to have up to 100 photos showing in your Premium BetterPholio™.

Thanks!
- Jim at BetterPhoto.com

See Jim Miotke's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Jim Miotke's Deluxe BetterPholio™ - Miotke.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Jim Miotke:
Jim Miotke's Online Photography Classes

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7058

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7058

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Lens Selection
I like taking portraits, both in the garage and outside. I have bought my first canvas backdrop and have some various lighting. I found a lens that describes what I would like to do. Uncertain if I really need. It is Minolta Maxxum 135mm f2.8 Autofocus Crossed X lens. I don't quite understand yet the different lenses. I have a 28 - 80mm and a 100 - 300mm. Any advise is much appreciated!
- Beki Felan

ANSWER 1:
You don't need it, Beki. What you have right now will do the job for you. Portrait lenses are in the of approx. 85mm to 200mm. You have that range already!
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7052

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7052

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: How to Shoot In Snow
Hi,
I wonder how to shot photos in snow - what is the best setting?
- Ziad H. Dabash

ANSWER 1:
Snowscape scenics are among the most difficult to expose correctly. Many come out with the snow rendered as a dull blue/grey color instead of white. Most in-camera meters are designed to turn the bightest component within the scene to a neutral grey. If at all possible, you should meter on a neutral colored object which recieves the same amount of light as the scene you intend to photograph, then, re-compose and shoot the scene at that setting. This will usually work out to become @ 1 to 1 1/2 stops over what your meter recommends as a correct setting... depending upon how brightly lit the scene is. Use this setting as a starting point, and bracket a half-stop under and over to be sure.
- Bob Cammarata

Visit cammphoto.com - Bob's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Ziad,
If you're using print film, there's also the challenge of getting the print lab to print it correctly. One-hour drugstore labs are notorious for not doing this very well. If you find a good consumer lab (one-hour variety) that makes prints well, treasure it . . . and most of all try to find out who's operating the lab equipment when you get the properly made prints. It is quite dependent on the person maintaining the equipment and operating the print machine.
- John A. Lind

See John's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7050

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7050

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: First Digital Camera
Any input about Sony's MVC-CD500 Digital Still Camera? I prefer Carl Zeiss lenses for their outstanding clarity... and this camera has one... plus 5.0 megapixel resolution... aside from that, I have no idea which digital camera to buy. Exactly what should I be looking for?
- Marty Cotter

ANSWER 1:
Marty,

Sony uses the Carl Zeiss lens name, they build to a set of specifications given by Carl Zeiss but the lenses are built by Sony. So the process of manufacturing is different. A real Carl Zeiss lens built by themselves are outstanding. In this case I would consider a Nikon 5700. It has wonderful ED glass. The metering on the 5700 is outstanding as well.
- Ryan Chai

ANSWER 2:
If you're astute enough to know about Zeiss optics, I doubt if you'll be really happy with this grade of digital. If this camera does not capture in TIF or raw mode, you'll have compromises associated with JPEG only capture to deal with. I have a Sony JPEG only camera. Without going into detail, my next digital will be from a company that makes cameras.
Look for a good buy on a Contax Aria or RTS-series SLR and use Zeiss lenses. If the cost of the camera is too steep, find a late Yashica SLR that takes Contax lenses. The buy a film scanner and learn Photoshop. This will give you high resolution, high color bit digital that will be a match for your excellent optics.
I think Canon's D1S with the full 35mm frame-sized CMOS (capture device) will come down in price, or the CMOS will be available on other Canon SLR's. There is an adapter available from bobshell.com that allows you to use Contax lenses on a Canon EOS. The drawback is the wait for this to happen. If you're willing to live with the multiplier factor that goes with a CMOS smaller than the 35 frame, use Contax lenses on a Canon 10d.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7042

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7042

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Comparing Od Pentax K1000 to the ZX-M
When I was in junior college (I'm 40 now), taking photography, I started out using a Pentax K1000 and loved it. I had that camera for a long time. My ex-husband sold it (long story), and later I bought a Canon Rebel X. Although the Rebel takes good pictures, I am *not* comfortable with it. It feels too small, there are too many buttons, and I don't like having less control. I'd like to get another Pentax K1000, but I want to buy a new (or like new) one. Finding one from a reputable dealer is difficult. I've considered the Pentax ZX-M, but I'm uncertain that I'd like the bar meter (in the viewfinder). [I'm worried that, at my age, I won't be able to see it that well.] Can you tell me if the ZX-M would be as good as the K1000? Am I the the only one on earth who *prefers* the old manual "tank" cameras to the new-fangled dinky automations?

Thanks.
- Rhonda Fremen-Young

ANSWER 1:
The most reputable dealer I know of is KEH.com out of Atlanta. I've never had a problem with them, and, unlike some of the NY operators, they are kind and courteous.
Don't be afraid to buy used from them. I think you'd love a Pentax MX. The Pentax A and K-series lenses are superb, and the M's are merely excellent. See a site on Pentax at http://www.bdimitrov.de/kmp/ for more Pentax suggestions.
You're hooked, as I am. Once you've used a simple, straightforward mechanical camera, these plastic ones never feel right.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Hey, Doug!
Thanks for your help!
I'll check out the Pentax site you mentioned. And thanks for letting me know that I'm not the only one who likes the more straightforward cameras.
Best wishes to you!
- Rhonda Fremen-Young

ANSWER 3:
Rhonda,
I second the motion to check out KEH for used equipment. They are the "gold standard" for used dealers. I recommend the "EX" or better condition equipment. The next grade down are in very good working condition, but will show wear, an indication that some of the useful life has already been consumed by previous owners. For more sophisticated metering in Pentax K-mount camera bodies, consider the K2DMD, LX, or ME Super (not the plain ME). These three have aperture priority AE in addition to manual control.

I wouldn't characterize most older, manual gear as "tanks" though, not unless you're describing a Nikon F2 or F3. :-)

Would settle for descrobing them as having a solid feeling and "heft" to them. The lenses also have smooth turning, damped focus rings and smooth detents on aperture rings. This is my biggest complaint about the new plastic wonders; focus rings feel like plastic grinding on plastic (almost as bad as fingernails on a chalk board). I believe there's a visceral connection between photographer and the equipment being used. The two must become "one" for best results.

As you might guess, I use older cameras/lenses and don't need (or want) the automagic gizmos. Most of them are 15-25 years old; one RF is 50 years old. They're still churning out photographs much like the day they were new, and all of them have been heavily used. I'd rather have them overhauled by someone who specializes in working on the particular make/model than to replace them with any of the new wonder-bricks.
- John A. Lind

See John's Premium BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7037

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7037

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: Extension Tubes
I have a Nikon N80. A 28-105 lens with macro, and a 70-300 lens. All Nikkor. I am planning to get a set of extension tubes.
Could you give me some tips about

* brand and quality you would reccomend
* tips I should consider before I purchase this.

This is not cheap and I don't want to waste my money.
Thanks a lot.
- Paulina Michaud

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Visit socwellphotography.com - Paulina's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Paulina,

You will love having extension tubes! They are a lot of fun, and open up a whole new world. After you get them I highly recommend goung to a park with flowers and a playground and not taking them off the lens.... Make yourself see through them.

I have a Nikon system as well, and you will do well with the Kenko extension tube set for Nikon AF. You will find, however, that you will not use the autofocus much... if at all. Since there is no glass in the tubes there is no reason to pay all the extra money for Nikon. The set of 12, 24 and 36mm are about $140 at B&H.

Here is a sample image I took with extension tubes.

Have Fun!
- Chris L. Hurtt

See Chris's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 2:
Paulina,

My upload didn't work. Go to my gallery if you wish and look towards the bottom... you can see examples there where I used the tubes.

Also, I just went to your site... Great pictures! You have a great eye for color!
- Chris L. Hurtt

See Chris's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Chris,
Thanks a lot for taking the time in answering my question and provide so useful details. I'll get my toy today :)

I will now go and visit your gallery.
- Paulina Michaud

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Visit socwellphotography.com - Paulina's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=7033

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=7033

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
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CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Photo Printers
I'd love to have a photo printer, but don't know where to start, so I thought I'd go to my new-found friends at BetterPhoto and ask for your advice.

My daughter and I have a very enjoyable small business doing outdoor family pix, children's candids, family reunions, a few weddings, etc. We let the photo lab do the printing and enlargements that people request, but I'd like to dip my toe into some of the editing for photos of my family, landscapes, etc.

I'm not happy with most of the prints I get from my HP all-in-one. I'd like the prints to last, so do I need to have a printer that uses special archival inks and papers? Thanks for your help.

Here is what I have to work with: a 3 megapixel Olympus digital, a nice Minolta SLR--I order the prints on CD when I have my film processed, and Photoshop Elements 2--having fun learning this!

If you have suggestions, please include the brand, model number and price. Thanks.
- Charlyce Altom

ANSWER 1:
Hi Charlyce:

Hands down! My recommendation is the Epson 2200 for about $700. It may sound like a good piece of change, but if it's your business, no matter how small, quality, speed, ease of use, and maintenace should be of paramount importance. This printer has it all. Every pro I know has one.

Good luck!
- Tony Sweet

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Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 2:
Tony, for those of us who can't afford to spend $700 on a printer right now, what Epson or other brand do you recommend? How about a list of printers in order of their 'greatness'!

Would you stick with Epson all the way, or do you think HP has one in there somewhere? I like the roll-paper feature of the 2200, but it's not my number one priority. Getting a professional color print is #1.
- Piper Lehman

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Visit pipershots.com - Piper's Deluxe BetterPholio™

ANSWER 3:
Hi Piper,

A professional level printer, although quite inexpensive by conventional standards, costs some bucks to most people. The 2200 is what every pro, that I know of, uses.

You can also look for refurbished 1270 and 1280 Epson printers, which are outstanding. Try calling Epson to find out where refurbs are available.

Good luck!
- Tony Sweet

See Tony Sweet's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Tony Sweet's Web Site - TonySweet.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Tony Sweet:
Image Design
Fine Art Flower Photography

ANSWER 4:
I have been using an epson 890 for about 3 years. I think that the price has come down to about $300. I does beautiful borderless photos. It is the same as an epson 1280 except that the max width is 8 1/2. It can accomodate roll paper, though I have not found a good way to uncurl this paper after printing. I buy 4x6, 5x7 and 8x10 premium glossy photo paper from epson online. There shipping is a flat $1.50 and there is no state sales tax to my area. Sorry if this sounds like a commercial, but I print many photos and like this printer. Another thought is that the key to good prints is the right paper that matches one of your driver settings. Hope this helps.
- Mary Binford

ANSWER 5:
I noticed the Epson 2200 only makes prints 13" x 44". What if you want to go bigger than the 13" size? Do you send out the work then? What lab do you recommend?
- Holly Higbee-Jansen

See Holly's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 6:
I agree with Tony. If you can swing it at all, go with the Epson 2200. I'm so glad I did. The inks are lightfast up to 100 years, and you can purchase papers other than Epson, that work beautifully with this printer, and I've found the Epson ink cartridges at a great price online at www.galleryprint.com. I do a lot of fine art photography which is shown in galleries... this printer is fantastic.
- Shirley Cross

See Shirley's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 7:
Ink Jet lays on the surface of a piece of paper. Burn your images to a CD and go to a local lab, Target, or a pro lab and use emulsion paper that goes thru regular developing chemistry.
Protect your images with Shurgard lacquer spray by McDonalds. Ink is expensive on ink jet printers and the makers know that. You'll never re-coupe your investment in an expensive ink jet. Should you insist on a printer for your home use, consider the Kodak 8500. It uses a subligmation process that make a print that is virtually impossible to tear in half and the detail and color is fantastic. ($1,000 and $1.75 average cost per 8X10 sheet)

Good Luck
- Gregg Vieregge

ANSWER 8:
Without trying to plug a specific seller: There are some mailorder outfits like mwave.com that sell the Epson 2200 for $589, and Epson 1280 for $380.
- Alan

ANSWER 9:
Hello:
Hopefully this information is found useful. I discussed questions and concerns about prints and printers with an Epson representative. I was told, that, the Epson inkjet 820 and the older 1270 have the same "guts" inside.
The down side is this printer can only print 8x10 size. However, it sells for approximately 80 dollars.
While I don't have the experience others have that have addressed this question, I've had nothing but great pics and results.
- Peter A. Gonzalez

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CONTINUING QUESTION 2: How to Resize a Digital Photo for Lab Printing
We are so very brand new at this! We've just bought a Canon S30, and are snapping away like maniacs. When we submit the shots we want printed to our local photo shop, our dog's ears and/or tail are cut off on a 4x6 print when they seem to be all there when viewed on the computer! We have Zoom Browser, which came with the camera, and also Adobe Photo Deluxe.
- Liz Na Webber

ANSWER 1:
The Canon S30 creates images in 1:1.333 aspect ratio (example 1600 pixels wide x 1200 pixels tall). The width is 1.333 times the height. A 4x6 inch print is 1:1.5 aspect ratio. To fill a 4x6 inch print, your image has to be enlarged to 4.5x6 inches, and then the extra 0.5 inch of height is cropped off.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
P.S.
The 1:1.3333 aspect ratio was chosen as it is a perfect match to most computer monitors. The thinking was to match the digital camera's images to its most likely use: Web pages and emailed photos. Unfortunately, it is not a commonly used print size.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 3:
P.S.S. ;-)
To get a "full frame" print you need to request that the printer not fill the long side. Have them enlarge to 4x5.3333 and leave the extra 2/3 inch of the print blank.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 4:
Jon has described your problem well. Here are a couple more ideas. Don't know how much resolution your images have. If they can withstand enlargement to 5x7, try that size. If not, then try asking for 4x5 or 3-1/2 x 5 prints. All three of these standard print sizes are closer to the 3:4 aspect ratio of your camera than a 4x6 is. If you're using a consumer lab, they may not be able to do 4x5's, but it's worth asking. It's one of the two sizes pro labs use for medium format proofs (the other is a 5x5 square).

BTW, the 4x6 print size was created because it exactly matches the 2:3 aspect ratio of 35mm film, but it doesn't match much of anything else very well.
- John A. Lind

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ANSWER 5:
Now to throw a monkey wrench in the mix. Most smaller frames you'll find at typical department stores and consumer labs conform to the 3:2 (2:3 or 1:1.5) aspect ratio (actually this should be called resolution ratio). Then there's your 8x10 which 1:1.25. The botton line is send your film or digital prints to a pro lab that can print any size print you want. It is all too confusing. I always shoot at 3:2 when shooting digitally because I always send my digital prints to a pro lab. If you have a Cord Camera in your area they offer any size print you want.
- George E. Givens Jr

ANSWER 6:
I still don't understand this. I have tried everything. My camera's image size is 2560 x 1920. Now Ofoto will not crop any image that has a 1:1.25 aspect ratio, which this does not. This is for a borderless print in 8x10. I want to save as much of the photo as possible, but I can't figure out what the pixels would be to give this ratio. To make matters worse I found this on the net, and it seemed COOL but that's not going to work either as far as my figures do this to that aspect ratio.
Surely there is some way to do this rather then to cut off half your photo for a borderless print! Please check this out below and any help would be wonderful as I am so tired of trying this.
http://home.cinci.rr.com/creek/frontier_resize.htm

- Cheryl Meisel

ANSWER 7:
Cheryl,

For maximum content on the 8x10 print (borderless), the long edge must be cropped from 2560 to 2400 pixels. Divide 1920 by four and then multiply the result by five. The print is an 8:10 aspect ratio (same as 4:5 and 1:1.125). This doesn't lose "half" the photo, only about 8% (about 1/12th).

I deal with this all the time when working with film, both 35mm small format and 645 medium format. Typically a slight amount of room along the long edge must be left in composing the photograph for the cropping necessary to get it onto a print. The one exception is from 645 to a 5x7 print that requires taking a very slight amount off of the short edge. BTW, 645 medium format is the same as most digitals, including yours, with a 3:4 aspect ratio, and cropping for standard print sizes bigger than the anomolous 4x6 (created solely for 35mm) isn't much.
- John A. Lind

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ANSWER 8:
Yes John thank you and I did know it was 2400 pixels I did the math 1000 times lol. I also know I was making it much bigger when I said half lol. But it is a good part of the photo and I just thought maybe there was another way but I guess not. Ahhhhhh well I guess I will SHOOT for that or try to in the future lol. Thanks!
- Cheryl Meisel

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