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SNAPSHOT - PHOTO NEWS FROM BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to SnapShot, the weekly newsletter on
the art of photography from
BetterPhoto.com


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IN THIS ISSUE - Tuesday, August 19, 2003
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* SPOTLIGHT: Got Awesome Photographs? Promote Them with a Deluxe BetterPholio™
* BETTERPHOTO: New Search Engine at BetterPhoto.com
* BETTERPHOTO: Feast Your Eyes on the July Contest Winners
* BETTERPHOTO: Four New Options in the Fall Line-Up of Online PhotoCourses™
* PHOTO TRIVIA QUESTION: Ethics of Photography / Origins
* THIS WEEK'S TIP: Growing Selections in Photoshop
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 1: Black Corners with Nikon Polarizer
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 2: Why Are My Uploaded Pics Blurry?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 3: Photo I.D. #
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 4: Lens Question
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 5: Incorrect ASA setting
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 6: I Need an Adapter and Don't Know What Kind
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 7: Black and White Print vs. Slide Film
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 8: 100 Foot Film?
* NEW PHOTO Q&A 9: How Do I Go About Selling Negatives?
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 1: Canon Rebel Ti - An Entry Level Camera?
* CONTINUING PHOTO Q&A 2: Eos 10D Cropping


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT - ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Got Awesome Photographs? Promote Them with a Deluxe BetterPholio™
With a Deluxe BetterPholio™, you can show off up to 1000 of your best images, set up slide shows, and create the look and feel you want... all in as little as 24-48 hours! Our Deluxe BetterPholio™ solutions give you a ONE STOP SHOP for getting your portfolio on the Web. And with our new Image Sales option, you can sell your images via the Internet! Learn more at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/sites4photogs/deluxeWebsites.asp


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WHAT'S NEW AT BETTERPHOTO.COM
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Welcome to the 126th issue of SnapShot!

Hi

Yahoo! We have posted the July photo contest winners. Congratulations to Tony Gough, Karen Spychalski, Kati Molin, Jean-François Schmutz, Anupam Pal, Elizabeth Stiles and all of the truly amazing photographers who placed as winners or finalists.

We are very excited to tell you about some wonderful new enhancements at BetterPhoto.com.

First, we have a new search engine. Finally! You can find what you're looking for in the QnA, photo discussions, courses and other sections of the site.

Also, we have four new exciting courses added to the Fall line-up - classes on everything from large format photography to photographing wildlife. Our newest instructors include George Schaub, Lewis Kemper, and Tom & Pat Leeson.

Enjoy and have fun photographing this week!
Jim Miotke
http://www.betterphoto.com/MG.asp?ID=124


*****
New Search Engine at BetterPhoto.com
Okay, so it's not an article but... Yahoo, anyway! We now have a new search engine at BetterPhoto.com! Use this new tool to find the courses, discussions, camera reviews, Q&A, and photos you have been looking for. You can also use it to locate cameras and other gear to buy at Amazon.com. You will find this new search box near the upper left corner of each page. Give it a spin!
http://www.betterphoto.com/home.asp


*****
Feast Your Eyes on the July Contest Winners
These award-winning photographs are so inspiring that they will knock your lens caps off and send you out the door with camera in hand... fully charged to get award-winning images of your own. For a great break to your daily routine, check out the 56 winning photos and the 317 contest finalists today:
http://www.betterphoto.com/contest/winners/0307.asp

View all of the beautiful contest finalists at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGall2.asp?catID=909


*****
Four New Options in the Fall Line-Up of Online PhotoCourses™
Tom and Pat Leeson and internationally recognized masters of wildlife photography. Their course will teach you how to capture those "once in a lifetime" wildlife moments when photographing the animal kingdom. The course includes lessons on how to find wildlife, stepping beyond ID photos, being prepared for action, and much more:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/LSN01.asp

Do you want to get the most out of your large format camera? Or have you been considering taking up this kind of photography? Then join Lewis Kemper, contributing editor to PC Photo magazine, to learn how to use a view camera to make great large format photographs. Topics include lens choice; rise and fall; tilt, shift, swing; and developing a workflow:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/LEW01.asp

Or, if you use the full version of Adobe Photoshop, perhaps you'd like to try a more digitally oriented course with Lewis Kemper. In his second course, you will learn the important lessons for controlling exposure and color correction techniques in this exciting and essential software tool for digital and film photographers. Learn how to get the most out of your Photoshop!
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/LEW02.asp

Are you trying to get a decent black and white print using a digital printer? Black and white photos offer great tonal and textural play - a wide variety of available expressive renditions. Black and white images seem to cut right to the heart of the subject matter, without the 'distraction' of color. But with the arrival of digital printing techniques, black and white photographers have been left somewhat in the cold. Enroll with George Schaub - famed author and editor of Shutterbug magazine - for his excellent online photography course to learn how to print beautiful black and white images in the digital darkroom:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/GEO01.asp

Check out all of our classes at:
http://www.betterphoto.com/online-photography-courses.asp

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PHOTO TRIVIA QUIZ OF THE WEEK
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Last week, we asked:
Who is Edward Curtis primarily known for photographing and why is his work disregarded by many historians and cultural anthropologists?

The first, best answer - entered by BetterPhoto member Joseph Nicoloffis:
Edward Curtis photographed the American Indian. He has been accused of posing his subjects in such a way as to support his preconceived notions of Indian life.

To see all answers to this question, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp?stat=PRV

And Now... This Week's Photo Trivia Question - Origins - entered by BetterPhoto member Jim Miotke

What kind of photography was Julia Margaret Cameron known for? Where was she born?

Submit your own answer to this question by visiting:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/trivia.asp

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THIS WEEK'S PHOTO TIP
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Growing Selections in Photoshop
Here's a tip for all you who use Photoshop or Photoshop Elements... For an extremely easy way to make a selection, you can utilize Photoshop's "Grow" command. Simply drag a standard rectangular (or eliptical) marquee over the area that you want to select. Then go to the Select menu and choose "Grow"... Voila! Everything around your marquee within a certain color range will be selected. This command works best with highly contrasting colors because it uses the Magic Wand's tolerance option. So if you don't like the results, you might want to experiment with the different tolerances available in the Magic Wand's option bar. Or use one of the many other selection tools.

To learn more about selecting in Photoshop, take my "Photoshop for Photographers" photo course:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JCM02.asp

Or you can take Jim Zuckerman's "Creative Techniques in Photoshop" to learn how to make cool special effects in Photoshop:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/JZK03.asp

Or perhaps you would enjoy "Photographer's Toolbox for Photoshop: Exposure and Color Corrections" by Lewis Kemper:
http://www.betterphoto.com/photocourses/LEW02.asp

Top Ten Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/tips.asp

All Tips:
http://www.betterphoto.com/exploring/allTips.asp

Add Your Own Tip:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/login.asp?category=tip&inputType=tip

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ADVERTISEMENT
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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P.O. Box 2781
Redmond, WA 98073-2781 USA

To order online, visit:
http://www.betterphoto.com/product/ourProductDetail.asp?productID=1096


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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - NEW THIS WEEK
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NEW QUESTION 1: Black Corners with Nikon Polarizer
I recently bought a package of three Nikon filters (for a Nikon Coolpix 995). When I use the polarizer, I get black corners. Any way to avoid this?
Also there were two other filters included, an ND4 and an ND8. How does using these filters differ from using Exposure Compensation settings?
Thanks.
- Ira Thomas

ANSWER 1:
The black corners are most likely evident at a wide angle setting. It is actually the rim of the filter blocking the line of sight of the image to the sensor. If you look carefully at a bright image, you may be able to see the effect on the lcd screen. Try a little longer focal length. The ND filters are used to avoid overexposure on bright images and more particularly, they allow you to shoot with a wider aperture and hence a shorter depth of field when you may not otherwise be able to.
- Wayne Attridge

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6507

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6507

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*****


NEW QUESTION 2: Why Are My Uploaded Pics Blurry?
I submitted a photo, and it's blurry. Its does not look this way... the actual photo is very sharp. How can I correct this, and resubmit it for entry into the contest? Any help you can give me would be great, as these are the first pics I have submitted.
- Angie Wittmer

See Sample Photo - Asley's Smile:
http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=166315

ANSWER 1:
Did you scan the print in a flatbed scanner? The scanning process, whether we scan from a print or from the film itself, causes a slight blurring effect. Imaging software, like Photoshop or Elements has a sharpening function to deal with this. The preferred method is called "Unsharp Mask" in Photoshop. See what your imaging software instructions say about sharpening. See also the comments on sharpening at scantips.com.

Another possible cause is compressing a JPEG image too much before working with it. Scan and work your image as a TIF. JPEG it only just before you send it. Sharpen it cautiously once it is in JPEG mode. For this web page, try not compressing the JPEG image at all, or only to about a 10 (on Photoshop's scale).
Excellent portrait, BTW. I think it deserves consideration in the contast if you did nothing more to it.
- Doug Nelson

Visit DougNelsonPhoto.com - Doug's Deluxe BetterPholio™

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6499

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6499

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*****


NEW QUESTION 3: Photo I.D. #
A photo is submitted in the contest. When uploading it into my Gallery it's asking for a Photo ID #. Where is it?
- Karen J. Bernsee

See Karen's Premium BetterPholio™

ANSWER 1:
Hi Karen,

The PhotoID box is for when you want to resubmit a photo to the contest. You don't need to enter anything there if you are just trying to get a photo into your Premium BetterPholio™.

If you want to resubmit a photo to the contest, you and get the PhotoID# from the URL (the http: thing in the browser's location field) when looking at the enlarged view of the image, as well as several other places.

If you want to simply get an image to display in your Premium BetterPholio™, go to your admin pages and the Select Gallery Photos link.
- Jim at BetterPhoto.com

See Jim Miotke's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Jim Miotke's Deluxe BetterPholio™ - Miotke.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Jim Miotke:
Jim Miotke's Online Photography Courses

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6488

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6488

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*****


NEW QUESTION 4: Lens Question
Hi again,
I hear all this talk about 20 -310mm f2 (or something along those lines) about lenses. I have figured out the mm part is the zoom... (I think) but somehow I still can't manage to figure out what the f thing is. Does it have something to do with the depth of field?
Thanks for your help.
- Josh

ANSWER 1:
The f-number, also called f-stop, refers to the maximum aperture of the lens. It is expressed as a ratio to the focal length, so f/2 means an maximum aperture with diameter equal to 1/2 the focal length, f/5.6 is 1/5.6 of the focal length, etc. The larger the maximum aperture (smaller number), the more light the lens lets in.

The f-numbers are standardized to ease the calculation of proper exposure. Longer focal length lenses let in less light than shorter focal length lenses, but if two lenses are both set to the same aperture value, say f/4, they let in the same amount of light.

Because the area of a circle (the aperture) is calculated as a function of the square of its diameter, doubling or halving the area is a function of the square root of 2, approximately 1.4. A "full stop" change in exposure is 1/2 or double the amount of light on the film, so the progression of f-numbers for aperture settings is 1 1.4 2 2.8 4 5.6 8 11 16 etc. f/4 lets in twice as much light as f/5.6 and 1/2 as much as f/2.8.

Apertures have an effect on depth of field (the depth of a scene that is in apparent focus). Smaller apertures (larger f-numbers) give greater depth of field, larger apertures (smaller f-numbers) give shallow depth of field.
- Jon Close

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6485

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6485

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*****


NEW QUESTION 5: Incorrect ASA setting
I bought a box of 4 rolls of Fujicolor Superia X-TRA 400 ASA. Unfortunately I didn't notice they threw in a bonus roll that was 800 ASA.

So I shot a roll of 800 ASA film with my Nikon FE set at 400 ASA.

Can anyone give me an idea if there is anything I can ask the developing lab to do to compensate? Do I need to go to a special lab? Also, can they compensate enough for me to do the rest in photoshop?

Obviously a novice,
D Dean
- D Dean

ANSWER 1:
I used to work in a photo lab... maybe you can ask them to develop your roll at a certain speed. I am not sure if that will work for color film or not. The other option is, maybe they can push it a few stops. I am not sure if that will help either though. I think if you tell them your dilema, they will find a way to help you. Just make sure you bring it to a GOOD photo lab (people that accually know what they are doing) and not some place like Walmart. You can ask them if they do their own color adjusting. They can probably help you the best.
- Tiffany M. Barkevich

ANSWER 2:
I think it'll be just fine. Most all color print films developed in C-41 process show little if any effect from push/pull development processing. Most color print film, especially ISO 400-800 have extremely wide exposure latitude, giving good results with exposures from -2 stops to +3 stops from optimal. You effectively gave the roll of 800 +1 stop of exposure compensation. I'd just have it developed normally.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 3:
Dear DD:
John's right: One stop of overexposure is not enough to present serious difficulties to the lab when it comes to printing a very decent photo. If anything the exposure error was in the right direction. You'd rather overexpose color negative film slightly than underexpose it.
- Maynard McKillen

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6476

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6476

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*****


NEW QUESTION 6: I Need an Adapter and Don't Know What Kind
Hi, I am very new to using a SLR and am trying to learn with help from other people, and reading as much info as I can get my hands on. I recently purchased a lens from a seller of an online auction and it doesn't fit my camera. The guy that I purchased it from said all I need is an adapter and it will solve the problem.

The problem at hand is... there are about twenty different adapters for sale on auction and I have no clue as to what I really need. The camera I have is a Minolta 700X. The lens is a Tamron SP 60-300mm 1:3.8-5.4 (These are the numbers on the lens. As you can tell I have no idea what they mean.) I bought this lens because the guy told me it would do awesome sports shots and that is the real reason I got into the SLR. I wanted to enjoy a baseball game and get some photos that didn't look like I flew over the stadium in a helicopter snapping away.

If anyone has information on this I would really appreciate your help. I have this terriffic looking lens and have no clue as to whether it will do what I want because it doesn't fit. Thanks a bunch.
- Terry McClain

ANSWER 1:
You need more information on the lens you bought. Tamron makes their lenses in many mounts to fit different makes of cameras. If this lens is made with the Nikon, or Pentax, or Canon mount you need to insist that the seller take it back.

However, Tamron also makes manual focus lenses with a "universal" mount they called "Adaptall", and the adaptor for each camera mount is sold separately. I suspect that is what you have. If so, you need the Adaptall mount for Minolta MD. B&H has them for about $35.
See http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=NavBar&A=search&Q=&ci=300 (the Tamron Adaptall mounts are listed on page 4 of that link).

You'll note that on page 1 of the above link that there is a less expensive (~$15) "general brand" T-mount to Minolta MD adaptor. I don't know if the Tamron Adaptall is the same as the T-mount.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
Dear Terry:
The Tamron 60-300SP was an adaptall series lens. Look for the M/MD adapter using John's link to B&H.
The T-mount John mentioned is a different animal from the Tamron adaptall series adapters, and while it serves a similar function, it would not help mate your lens to the Minolta body. A T-mount is used, typically, to mate a thread mount lens to a camera body that takes bayonet mount lenses. I suspect your 60-300 lens does not have threads at the back end, but a rather complicated looking bayonet- design mount, which mates to the Tamron Adaptall mount.
You may want to buy a T-mount for your camera, however, if you ever plan to mount it to a telescope, which is one other purpose for a T-mount...
- Maynard McKillen

ANSWER 3:
Thank you both so very much. I appreciate your help. I purchased the adapter and it works great. Once again, thank you.
- Terry McClain

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6474

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6474

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*****


NEW QUESTION 7: Black and White Print vs. Slide Film
What is the difference between print B&W film and slide B&W film? Can they only be used with certain cameras? I have been trying to do research to find out, but haven't come across anything helpful yet.
- Penelope D. Lamb

ANSWER 1:
Hi Penelope
As long as you camera and film are 35mm, you can use them when ever you want. The only difference I can think of between the two is when you get them developed, the color of the black on the slide film might be a tiny bit purple-ish.
- Tiffany M. Barkevich

ANSWER 2:
As Tiffany stated, you can use either slide or print film interchageably in your camera. Choose which you want based on what you want as final output (prints or slides).

There is only one B&W slide film that I know of, Agfa Scala 200x. It requires a unique development that is done by only a few labs. See
http://www.agfa.com/photo/products/film/professional/bwrevfilm/

for more information.

Kodak's T-MAX 100 B&W print film can be processed into B&W slides by exposing the film at ISO 50 instead of 100, and using Kodak's T-MAX 100 Direct Positive Film Developing Outfit. See Kodak Technical Publication J-87 for more information:
http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/j87/j87.jhtml

Both the Agfa Scala 200 and Kodak T-Max 100 will result in true black and white slides without color casts.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 3:
Thank you guys very much. I just bought 15 rolls of B&W print film and I am looking forward to taking alot of pictures :)
- Penelope D. Lamb

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6471

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6471

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*****


NEW QUESTION 8: 100 Foot Film?
I was looking for film on a web site and I came across a link that said 100 foot rolls. I wasn't sure what they were and there was no descripion. Can somebody please help me.
- Penelope D. Lamb

ANSWER 1:
Professional photographers who use a lot of film (or anyone for that matter) can buy their film in rolls of 100 feet and fill their own cartridges with as many shots as they want. It is a bit cheaper in bulk but you beed to buy a proper dispenser and blank rolls to refill.
- Michael Kaplan

ANSWER 2:
Thank you very much.
- Penelope D. Lamb

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6470

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6470

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*****


NEW QUESTION 9: How Do I Go About Selling Negatives?
My father-in-law passed away a couple of years ago. He was a professional photographer for over 40 years. In 1962 while working for the Berkeley Gazette, he shot pictures of President John F Kennedy. I believe it was at the Graduation Ceremony at the college.

We would like to check into selling the prints and negatives.

Any advice?
- Donna

ANSWER 1:
I'd first research whether you father owns the rights to these images, or if they actually belong to the newspaper he was working for when he took them. I know possession is 9/10ths of the law, but it's that last 1/10th that keeps lawyers in Mercedes. ;-)
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
I know that they are his. He NEVER sold negatives. But now that he is gone, my mother-in-law does not want them.
- Donna

ANSWER 3:
Hey Donna,
are you SURE you want to sell the negatives? I dont know, but I think they will be worth even more money in the future. At least to a photographer, negatives are the most important thing to keep. But that is just my opinion.
- Tiffany M. Barkevich

ANSWER 4:
Dear Donna:
I'm not sure how much time and energy you care to invest in this matter, but here are several ways to proceed.
It's possible that UC Berkeley, some Kennedy archives, or a private archive may be interested in the images. If so, the next challenge is to get the images appraised. After you have some idea of their value, you might consider donating the images to an archive. This might, and you'll want to research this also, might be a tax deductible donation.
Barring this angle, you may still want to get them appraised, and sell the images on ebay, or have the appraiser help you find a buyer.
- Maynard McKillen

ANSWER 5:
If they are rare, good photos, you may want to look into licensing the prints and keep the negatives. There will never be any more taken and they should retain or increase their value. That way, you would get the best of both worlds.
- Wayne Attridge

ANSWER 6:
I absolutly agree with Maynard. You should really consider what was said on these comments. Wayne makes an even better point (which is similar to mine with some added extras) as far as I'm concerned, my point still stands. Selling your negatives, to a photographer, is like selling their soul. If you are only interested in the money, I would still hang on to the negatives. They're antiques!
- Tiffany M. Barkevich

ANSWER 7:
Thanks for all the wonderful suggestions.
I think you are ALL right about the selling of the negatives, but I am interested in getting them appraised. Any suggestions on how to go about this?
Thanks
- Donna

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6467

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6467

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PHOTOGRAPHY Q&A - CONTINUING FROM PREVIOUS NEWSLETTER
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CONTINUING QUESTION 1: Canon Rebel Ti - An Entry Level Camera?
Okay, so everyone says the Rebel Ti is an "entry level" camera. My question is what makes it so basic? It has complete manual focus and exposure and autoexposure (from what I understand) so what's the deal? If I want to get a camera that won't be practically useless to me in a few years, what do you suggest?
- Josh

ANSWER 1:
Hi Josh
In my opinion, no camera is completely useless. One of the main reasons why it is considered basic, is because you can't really do as much as you would want to compared to a manual camera. Plus, the instructions for it are easy to understand for someone who doesn't know "the basics".

Regaurdless, the Rebel is a cool camera, I have used it a few times myself. The only thing that I am conserned with is how much they cost. I really don't know. All that I am saying is, you might be able to find a great camera that is used (and probably BARELY used) for cheaper. I don't know much about specific types of cameras, but I know that they have used camera shops and typically they will give you some honest advice about buying a used camera.
- Tiffany M. Barkevich

ANSWER 2:
Okay, but can't you set the aperture and shutter speed on the Rebel Ti? Because if you can't set your own DOF, it's no good to me.
- Josh

ANSWER 3:
I just downloaded the instruction booklet of the Canon Rebel Ti and it has manual focus and aperture settings it even has that "bulb" setting your supposed to use for fireworks. And one of the coolest features I saw was the DOF preview button. so I think I am going to go with this camera... if anyone can't find anything wrong with those statements...
- Josh

ANSWER 4:
Hey Josh,
The Rebel Ti IS a cool camera. I had my own fun with it. And besides, if you really like the camera, don't let anyone tell you any differently. What I figure is, as long as your comfortable with what you are working with, your photos will let that show. I can tell you it is no fun trying to learn a new camera that you know nothing about. In the end, of course, it is fullfilling! But enjoy your Rebel Ti. I know that a lot of other people do.
- Tiffany M. Barkevich

ANSWER 5:
The Canon Rebel Ti is considered by many as an entry-level camera because, comparitively, it is very inexpensive. Sure it costs more than used manual focus cameras - but if you want to have the autofocus option (I know I would), then the Rebel series are all excellent cameras to work with.
- Jim at BetterPhoto.com

See Jim Miotke's Premium BetterPholio™
Visit Jim Miotke's Deluxe BetterPholio™ - Miotke.com

Take an Online PhotoCourse™ with Jim Miotke:
Jim Miotke's Online Photography Courses

Read this Q&A at BetterPhoto.com:
http://www.betterphoto.com/forms/qnaDetail.asp?threadID=6497

Answer this question:
http://www.betterphoto.com/QnAredirect.asp?threadID=6497

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*****


CONTINUING QUESTION 2: Eos 10D Cropping
Can anyone please explain the cropping on this camera. Also, when the camera crops the photo does it decrease the megapixels down to 3 megapixels?
- Eric Hamlin

ANSWER 1:
The 10D uses lenses designed for 35mm film. These lenses are designed to fill the 24mm x 36mm frame of film. On the 10D, however, the digital image sensor is smaller than 24mm x 36mm. Hence the image provided is cropped in comparison to 35mm film. It does not affect the megapixel count.
- Jon Close

ANSWER 2:
The actual term is not crop which may be why there is a bit of confusion. It is actually a Focal Length Multiplier.

It is similar to cropping a picture (thus the term crop factor' but it is actually because the sensor is smaller than a 35mm frame, it just sees a smaller angle when shooting thru the same lens as a 35mm.

Different cameras have different amounts of compensation to figure out the equivalent coverage of a 35mm lens. The Canon EOS-10D for example is 1.6x the focal length of a 35mm lens so that 50mm lens that so many people have would be 80mm on the Canon. If the sensor is 6MP like on the Canon then you get a 6 MP image. It is just not using the complete lens surface available. This is good for most things but bad in another way.

The Good is your telephoto/zoom lenses now have a greater reach. Your 200mm lens is now the equivalent of a 320mm. Also the weakest quality of a lens is the corners and because of the smaller CMOS/CCD imager you do not use as much of the corner so you would find sharper corners on a picture taken with the 10D than if that same lens was on a 35mm film or full frame camera (like the 1Ds).

The Negative is your wide angle lenses are now not as wide. Your (or my) 15-30mm wide zoom becomes a 24-48mm equivalent lens.

Hope this helps you understand the "crop" factor of the new imagers. There is a wonderful article with examples if you care to read more at the Luminous Landscape site: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/dslr-mag.shtml
- Michael Kaplan

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