Kodachrome 64 Slide Film


Kodak

Categories: Reviews: Equipment : Film : Color Slide Film (35mm)

The Kodachrome 64 Slide Film

A classic (immortalized by Paul Simon in song) and a favorite of many, many photographers, this is a wonderful film. It is trusted by many for good reason; if you have ever seen a 25 year old Kodachrome slide, you know why.

The tight grain and natural, warm colors of this film will help produce stunning transparencies that can be enlarged many times.


2 Reviews  

Average Rating: 5 out of 5

5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras
 
Thomas J. Nadramia 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/10/2004 2:04:38 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/10/2004 2:04:38 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/10/2004 2:04:38 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/10/2004 2:04:38 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/10/2004 2:04:38 PM
Rating: 5 out of 5
Every time I get back a roll of Kodachrome slides (both 64 and 200 ISO), I just go "wow". To me, it's the best slide film out there, worth the extra hassle of having uses Kodak mailers to get it processed.

Tom N

4/10/2004 2:04:38 PM
 
John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/27/2001
5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras
Rating: 5 out of 5
It is the best of film and it is the worst of film. [Apology to Charles Dickens.] Which one depends on who you ask about Kodachrome. All agree that Kodachrome has a "look" unmatched by any other transparency film, and unrivaled archival in dark storage (not continuously exposed to bright daylight). KR-64 ("consumer") and PKR-64 (Professional) are the most popular speeds (25 and 200 are the other two). Originally created by Kodak in the mid-1930's, it has withstood the test of time and been *the* benchmark for color film standards ever since.

Color rendition is very accurate without undue saturation. Skin tones are excellent. In sunlight it has bright colors. Shadow brings out its richness.

What makes Kodachrome so different? It is one of the finest grain color films made and is processed K-14 instead of the E-6 used for all the Ektachromes, Fujichromes and Agfachromes. Grain and sharpness are barely exceeded by Kodachrome 25, and among the E-6's it's rivaled only by Fuji's Provia 100F. Why does the K-14 process make a difference? Kodachrome's emulsion layers are thinner without the dye linkers E-6 emulsions have making for sharper contrast edges and less susceptibility to irradiation. The yellow layer in particular helps set it apart from the E-6's.

Yes, the emulsion and its processing have evolved some over time. Don't let this fool you. The secret, and why my K-14 Kodachrome 64's look just like my father's K-12 Kodachrome II's is in the basic _concept_ behind its processing.

Want images that have the classic "look" of National Geographic images in the '50's, '60's and '70's? Want images with very high resolution and color accuracy? Try some K-64. Have it direct printed to reversal paper or Ilfochrome paper by a good lab. It "blows away" color negative prints. Nothing else like it!

-- John

 

2 Reviews