Rolleiflex T Medium Format Camera


Rollei

Categories: Reviews: Equipment : Cameras : Other Film Cameras : Medium Format

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8 Reviews  

Average Rating: 4 out of 5

4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Golden Cameras
 
Michael C. McCourt 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/21/2005 8:15:26 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/21/2005 8:15:26 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/21/2005 8:15:26 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/21/2005 8:15:26 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/21/2005 8:15:26 AM
Rating: 4 out of 5
I bought it in New York. I wanted a classic medium format that I could afford and something with histroy behind it. It dates around 1945. Good camera. The ground glass is in pretty good condition and is feels good in my hands, like a mini tank. Takes pretty good pictures. Great converstation piece.
8/21/2005 8:15:26 AM
 
linda ozag
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/8/2005
5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/14/2005 5:31:43 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/14/2005 5:31:43 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/14/2005 5:31:43 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/14/2005 5:31:43 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 8/14/2005 5:31:43 PM
Rating: 5 out of 5
great looking negatives
8/14/2005 5:31:43 PM
 
Paul Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/31/2004
4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/3/2005 7:05:44 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/3/2005 7:05:44 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/3/2005 7:05:44 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/3/2005 7:05:44 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/3/2005 7:05:44 AM
Rating: 4 out of 5
I love the larger negative size and reflex finder that you look down into. I don't like the limit of 12 exposures on a roll. I no longer use the Rollei TLR because 120 film is no longr available.
1/3/2005 7:05:44 AM
 
Paul Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/31/2004
4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/1/2005 8:00:32 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/1/2005 8:00:32 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/1/2005 8:00:32 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/1/2005 8:00:32 AM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 1/1/2005 8:00:32 AM
Rating: 4 out of 5
Many years ago, I used several Rollei TlR cameras. These cameras had an advantage when taking pictures of subjects who were camera shy. Just hang the camera at your waist, look down at the focusing screen and take the picture. You could turn your body in one direction and point the camera in another direction. I liked the bigger negative size, too, but the limitation (at that time) to 12 exposures was a negative. I eventually switched to 35mm to get 36 exposures before having to reload.
1/1/2005 8:00:32 AM
 
Peter Falkenberg 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 7/31/2004 6:55:50 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 7/31/2004 6:55:50 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 7/31/2004 6:55:50 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 7/31/2004 6:55:50 PM 5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 7/31/2004 6:55:50 PM
Rating: 5 out of 5
The Rolleicord I own was made in 1953. It came before the Rolleiflex. It uses a square format and a little difficult to get used to at first. The lens is flawless and the only negative I can think of is the viewfinder which is darker than most.
7/31/2004 6:55:50 PM
 
Michael E. Brodie
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/28/2004
4.5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5/21/2004 11:10:57 AM 4.5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5/21/2004 11:10:57 AM 4.5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5/21/2004 11:10:57 AM 4.5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5/21/2004 11:10:57 AM 4.5 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 5/21/2004 11:10:57 AM
Rating: 4.5 out of 5
My Rolleiflex TLR (Twin Lens Reflex) has one of the sharpest and highest contrast lenses I've ever used. It's one of the finest picture taking machines I own even though this one has no meter, no provision for 220 film and shows its ground-glass image reversed left-to-right. Transparencies as well as negatives are joy to behold. I got it second-hand, had it reconditioned and was immediately offered twice as much for it as I had put into it. I politely declined the offer, the camera store owner smiled and said he would say the same thing to me if the roles were reversed. I've never been disappointed. Because the leather case is old, some of the stitching has come loose so I have to be very careful not to let it become worse. There aren't many places left that can do that kind of repair work.
5/21/2004 11:10:57 AM
 
Erik Moon 3 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/9/2004 7:06:09 PM 3 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/9/2004 7:06:09 PM 3 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/9/2004 7:06:09 PM 3 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/9/2004 7:06:09 PM 3 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 4/9/2004 7:06:09 PM
Rating: 3 out of 5
This camera is a great way to try medium format photograghy. I purchased mine for $400, used of course. Because this camera is all manual and no meter with it, it can be very challenging to use. The optics are oustanding. I love the quality of the images I get from this camera.
4/9/2004 7:06:09 PM
 
John R. Keistler 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 3/12/2003 6:30:24 PM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 3/12/2003 6:30:24 PM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 3/12/2003 6:30:24 PM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 3/12/2003 6:30:24 PM 4 out of 5 BetterPhoto Cameras 3/12/2003 6:30:24 PM
Rating: 4 out of 5
I first learned photography on a Yashica-Mat TLR in the sixties in school. I have always loved twin-lens photography since. I primarily photograph with Leica reflexes, but the TLR occupies a definite place for me.

For the beginning darkroom worker, medium format is so much easier to work with than 35mm! Every little speck of dust isn't enlarged so much--it's much more forgiving of darkroom errors.

The square format is ideal for these cameras because it doesn't require turning the camera in a specific orientation. Besides, one can easily crop in the darkroom with the large negative.

The twin-lens configuration, where the phootgrapher looks down into the groundglass, can be ideal for portrait photography, where the subject doesn't get the sensation of being 'aimed at'. This is what I still prefer these camera for--people. Most TLR's use a taking lens of around 75-80mm--a little short for a classic 'portait' lens, but close. Simply concentrate your subject in the central part of the groundglass, and crop in the darkroom if desired. For me, I prefer using the whole frame. Again, there is the flexibility of the square format. I generally have an idea of what I want the photo to accomplish before I take it, so there's no great deliberation afterward.

The Rollei TLR's are all excellent, at least those made within the past 50 years. You can't go wrong with any of them. They are beautifully constructed and extremely durable if maintained. They are as quiet as an M6 Leica. They are often lighter today than some of the 35mm SLR's, and some are smaller also!

Limitations? Only one focal length. However, take a look at the classic photos with the Rollei TLR! Not suitable for every photo situation, but then, no camera is. A single focal length is a great teacher of camera technique and composition. From time to time when I feel I'm being confused with my 12 Leica lenses, I pull out a Rollei for a month and recharge my batteries.

Buy any good Rollei TLR; it's an investment and a camera that can stay with you for life--and then some!

3/12/2003 6:30:24 PM
 

8 Reviews