BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

To participate in the Forum, become a BetterPhoto member or Sign In.

 
Photography Question 
Erica T. MacDonald

member since: 3/5/2010
 

Macro Photography


 
  Closeup Flower 1
Closeup Flower 1
© Erica T. MacDonald
Canon Power Shot S...
 
  Closeup Flower 2
Closeup Flower 2
© Erica T. MacDonald
Canon Power Shot S...
 
 
I love taking pictures of flower closeups, but I usually only do it with my point-and-shoot Canon using macro. I don't currently have a macro lens for my Canon Rebel XS and want one. What type of macro lens should I use? What size and brand do you recommend for the sharpest photo? Can you please explain why you picked that particular lens too?
Thanks so much!

3/20/2010 7:19:54 AM

 
Carlton Ward
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Carlton
Carlton's Gallery
carltonwardphoto.com

member since: 12/13/2005
  Hello Erica,
There are a bunch of threads already on this subject, you can always search for a topic (macro lens) and read through them.
I have the Canon 100mm f/2.8 macro lens with a Pro-Master ringflash (the store didn't have the Canon MR-14EX). The lens is a 1:1 lens with focusing distance at about 1 foot away. They also just came out with an L lens with IS for shooters that use their macro lens for other type of shooting. I see no reason to upgrade to that lens as mine is sharp and I always use a tripod & manually focus - so I am not shooting fast paced like at weddings, etc..
There are a couple of courses here at BP for macro photography. There is a bit of a learning curve but once you have a few basics down, you can create some great macro images.
I have thought about selling mine as I want to get the Canon 180mm L macro lens.
Cheers...

3/20/2010 8:11:42 PM

 
John H. Siskin
BetterPhoto Member
John-Siskin.com
John's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Getting Started in Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Photography Lighting on Location and in the Studio
 
 
  Lizard
Lizard
Taken with a 63mm Zeiss Luminar, which makes the whole thing even more surprising. 1/60, Sunpak 611 flash, T-stop 8 (yes T-stop) at an ISO of 160. I really surprised he didnít run away.
© John H. Siskin
john-siskin.com
4-Week Short Course: Getting Started in Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Photography Lighting on Location and in the Studio
4-Week Short Course: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting
Kodak DCS 14N Digi...
 
 
Hi Erica,
I was out playing with a Zeiss Luminar lens, basically a microscope lens mounted on my camera. I am a little closer than 1:1 with the set-up I used. There are a lot of fun things you can do with microscopes. Here is an article on the subject: www.siskinphoto.com/magazine/zpdf/Microscope.pdf. There are a lot of very creative ways to do micro work that donít rely on proprietary lenses.
Thanks...

3/21/2010 8:54:29 PM

 
Ken Smith
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Ken
Ken's Gallery

member since: 6/11/2005
  The Sigma 105mm is very nice as is the Sigma 180mm ... and Carlton has already mentioned the Canon 100mm lens. All these are great lenses and John has a creative idea too!

3/22/2010 3:56:49 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
 
 
  1:1 Lifesize
1:1 Lifesize
© Bob Cammarata
cammphoto.com
Nikon D300 Digital...
 
 
A lens reversing ring is another commonly used technique for shooting close. These rings come in a variety of camera mounts and thread sizes and can be used to mount a standard lens backwards to increase image magnification. (A trade-off is that your ability to lock in on critical focus will be limited to moving the camera and tripod back and forth.)
Another option is to extend the rear element with a set of extension tubes or a bellows assembly. Depending upon the lens focal length and amount of extension, extreme magnifications are possible with no glass elements to compromise the integrity of the lens.
(...just my $.02)

3/28/2010 3:14:26 AM

 
Steve Jolicoeur

member since: 6/9/2006
  Question
Aperant dust on senser.
Right from new, I have what apears to be dust on the sensor, my luck , but the diferance is that between F2.8 and f9, it is not visable, F11 to f22 , very visable, other cameras its either there or its not.I have cleaned my lenses, I have blown the senser , nothing moves it , given that its only at those f stops, is it realy dust? It is on a D300 Nikon, vibrating senser does nothing, nor huricane blower, nor vaccum, and its definatly in camera.

4/6/2010 11:31:38 AM

 
John H. Siskin
BetterPhoto Member
John-Siskin.com
John's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Getting Started in Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Photography Lighting on Location and in the Studio
  Hi Steve,
I donít know, but this sounds like something on the lens, perhaps on the back. If it was on the sensor the aperture shouldnít affect it.
Good luck! John Siskin

4/6/2010 3:12:24 PM

 
Steve Jolicoeur

member since: 6/9/2006
  Hay John,
Thanks for the input, sorry for being in the wrong place also, Computer iliterate I am .
I have cleaned front and back of the lenses, also changing lenses does nothing , so it has to be in camera , definatly a diferant situation it is,i was hoping some one may have heard of such a delema?.I can fix the pictures , but I am getting tired of the extra steps . Thanks for the response .
Steve.

4/6/2010 3:56:49 PM

 
Lynn R. Powers
Contact Lynn
Lynn's Gallery

member since: 9/12/2006
  Steve,
Post a photo, it will let us see exactly what you are talking about.


Lynn

4/7/2010 1:29:23 PM

 

To participate in the Forum, become a BetterPhoto member or Sign In.
 

Copyright © 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc.ģ All Rights Reserved.