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Photography Question 
Robyn Gwilt
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/15/2005
robyngphotography.com
 

Advice for Office Furniture Shoot


Hi. I'm going to be shooting some office furniture. We're hiring a studio (100sqm) that comes with an infinity curve, 1x 600w, 2 x 400w ( I also have 2 x 400w lights), brollies, silver brollies, octo box. Any ideas/tips on
a)lighting set-up/positioning of lights.
b)I'm going to shoot with a Canon 5D Mk II. I have a 24-105mm IS L lens (will this be wide enough so that I don't get the "keystone" effect on legs?), or shall I shoot with my Sigma 17-70 lens? The client wants the images on a nice crisp white background, for use in brochures, etc.
Any tips or suggestions will be gratefully accepted.
Thanks.


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9/23/2009 3:53:45 AM

 
John H. Siskin
BetterPhoto Member
John-Siskin.com
John's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Getting Started in Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Photography Lighting on Location and in the Studio
  Hi Robyn,
You will want to use a longer focal length, rather than a shorter one to reduce any keystone affects. Regardless, you will probably need to use Photoshop to perfect the perspective of your product. I would start by placing a large light source - perhaps a big umbrella - above the subject. You could use a boom for this, but you may be able to find a position with a regular stand that will work. You will need another light, probably about level with the product; the best position will depend on the reflections in the product. Of course, you will need a couple of lights on the background, or you will need to clip the background out of the image. I prefer clipping, since it lets you drop in anything, and the background light can sometimes be too bright. Product photography is fun!


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9/29/2009 10:22:49 PM

 
Robyn Gwilt
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/15/2005
robyngphotography.com
  John, are you saying then that the 24-105 won't be ideal?
I'll have limited "step back" space in the area I'm shooting.
I can put the 17-70 on the 30D but that gives me about the same as the 24-105 on the full frame. I have a 70-200 IS lens, but that's going to be too much surely!
Thanks
Robyn


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9/30/2009 12:38:58 AM

 
John H. Siskin
BetterPhoto Member
John-Siskin.com
John's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Getting Started in Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Photography Lighting on Location and in the Studio
  Hi Robyn,
In your original post you suggested the 17- 70 as an alternative lens, and it was this lens that I though you shouldn't use. The 24-105 should give you the right focal length. I would guess that 80mm will be about right.
Thanks, John Siskin


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9/30/2009 9:53:44 AM

 
Robyn Gwilt
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/15/2005
robyngphotography.com
  Ok, great. Thank you very much.


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10/1/2009 1:27:39 AM

 
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