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Category: New Questions

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Photography Question 
Tara R. Swartzendruber

member since: 3/28/2007
 

Yellow in Studio


 
  model
model
studio lighting. Camera manual, ISO 100, 1/125, Aperature f10
© Tara R. Swartzendruber
Nikon D80 Digital ...
 
 
Yikes! All the photos I shot last night have a yellowish tint to them on the white background. I didn't change anything in my studio set-up or camera that I know of, so why would this be? Sometimes, I get a slightly bluish tint, but never so much yellow.

8/20/2009 8:17:38 PM

 
Carlton Ward
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Carlton
Carlton's Gallery
carltonwardphoto.com

member since: 12/13/2005
  Hi Tara,
You need to use a gray card and set your white balance. Shooting Raw will allow you some leeway for correction but its best to get it right from the start. What we see and what the camera sees are 2 different things. Our brain knows the background paper is white but it sometimes tricks us in different lighting because we already know its white, so it doesn't seem to change from looking at it in different lighting temps even though it has changed.
Take a practice shot with the gray card in the photo - try to get it positioned where your subject is so that the light hitting the card will be the same as the light on your subject.
Check the photo in PS or other editing software and see if you need to warm or cool your white balance until the gray card looks accurate.
You also need to be aware of walls and ceiling color because they can cast their color onto your subject.
I sometimes get lazy with my white balance when out shooting snapshots and I usually have mine set around 5500 for outside normal shooting. I like a little warmer tone :) But shooting inside, I try to get everything correct from the start.
Richard or John can probably explain this better than me and Richard probably has a link for a tutorial.
Hope this helps.

8/20/2009 10:22:47 PM

 
Tara R. Swartzendruber

member since: 3/28/2007
  I have tried to set custom white balance in the studio, but can NEVER get it to work. It shows that it didn't register. (any thoughts here?) So, since I don't change my studio set up much, I have light amounts and camera setting that work for me most of the time. I have been shooting in there for 2 years and have never had such yellow shots. That's why I'm wondering if something else is wrong.

8/21/2009 6:39:59 AM

 
Carlton Ward
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Carlton
Carlton's Gallery
carltonwardphoto.com

member since: 12/13/2005
  Hi Tara,
I haven't tried this product but it advertises to be simple & accurate.
http://colorright.com/
I am intirgued and may buy one as well :)
Cheers,
Carlton

8/21/2009 8:36:07 AM

 
Tara R. Swartzendruber

member since: 3/28/2007
  how is this different than an expodisc? I've seen these advertized too.

8/21/2009 11:05:13 AM

 
John H. Siskin
BetterPhoto Member
John-Siskin.com
John's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting
4-Week Short Course: Getting Started in Commercial Photography
4-Week Short Course: Portrait Photography Lighting on Location and in the Studio
  I donít think the background comes across as very yellow in the sample, but uploads arenít the same as real files. I would set the lighting and then take a shot with a gray card in the set. Then I do the white balance after the shoot in Adobe Raw or the proprietary program from the camera manufacturer. This is easy and quick. The reason you have a problem is that your camera is on auto color. Unfortunately, this is not always right, no auto system is always right. So the skin tones of the subject may have caused the shift in color. This is a good reason to always shoot in raw, as you could fix this easier and quicker when you convert from raw file to whatever file type you need. On many occasions, I shoot with my camera at a specific setting, as Carlton suggests. Then I use the computer to create pleasing color, which works well. If I need accurate color, as with coping artwork, I will always use a gray card.

8/21/2009 11:08:07 AM

 

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