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Category: New Questions

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Photography Question 
Carlene M. Shea

member since: 4/24/2008
 

Panning: How to Do It?


I purchased a Fujifilm Finepix S700 and am trying to do panning but I am getting confused with it. I have tried different shutter speeds and aperture settings, but it seems I'm doing something wrong. Any advice or info would be great.

4/24/2008 6:48:55 AM

 
W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
"it seems Im doing something wrong" is not exactly a clear description of your problem, Carlene...

4/24/2008 7:16:18 AM

 
Carlene M. Shea

member since: 4/24/2008
  Sorry W.S, I should have explained. In my book its telling me to set my shutter speed at 4 secs. to 1/1000 but when I go to do this on my camera the shutter speed only ranges from 1" to 4", Im sorry if Im not making sense, Im very new to this., Thanks

4/24/2008 10:57:43 AM

 
W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
"In my book"

What book?

"its telling me to set my shutter speed at 4 secs. to 1/1000"

Which is it? 4 seconds or 1/1000th? And why is your 'book' telling you that?

"but when I go to do this on my camera the shutter speed only ranges from 1" to 4"".

According to http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/specs/Fujifilm/fuji_finepixs5700.asp your S700 has a shutter speed range from 1/1000th to 4 seconds. Aren't you interpreting an abbreviation wrong?

4/24/2008 11:23:20 AM

 
Carlene M. Shea

member since: 4/24/2008
  "In my book" meaning the book that came with the camera explaining to me how to use the camera.This is what is written on a page in the book....
Setting the shutter speed
1.Press exposure compensation button to open the setting screen
2.press the arrows to select shutter speed
3.press the shutter button to take pictures
4.Check shutter speed setting 4 sec. to 1/1000 sec
I am merely trying to understand this a little at a time.

4/24/2008 12:54:03 PM

 
W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
Would that be in a chapter titled "Shutter Speed Priority"?

4/24/2008 1:04:38 PM

 
Carlene M. Shea

member since: 4/24/2008
  Yes, its just a single page titled shutter priority AE

4/24/2008 1:51:17 PM

 
W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
  Select a shutter speed and the camera will pick the corresponding f/stop (provided it is within its range at the set ISO rating).
For panning to get a relatively focused subject against a speed-streaked background you will need a slowish shutter speed, like 1/30th or 1/15th, and practice tracking your subject evenly while exposing.
You'll have many, many misses and just very rarely keepers. But when you do, they'll be great! It's worth the effort, so keep at it!
Have fun!

4/24/2008 2:54:22 PM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/21/2004
  wait,if you can't pan to start with,you can't slow the shutter speed down.a 4 sec pan?now a 1/4 sec pan,1/250th?starting point.
eh well.

4/24/2008 9:06:53 PM

 
W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
Don't let Sam confuse you, Carlene. Just set a slowish shutter speed (between 1/2 and 1/30th) and start taking lots of tracked photos.

Good luck.

4/25/2008 10:02:56 AM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/9/2005
  Carlene,
W.S. is right about speeds when panning. Anything slower than 1/4 sec is quite difficult. Anything faster than 1/125th won't get you the effect; so use speeds between the two. It is possible to do a very slow pan, but that will require a tripod with a fluid head, a steady hand when panning and some serious ND filters.
Panning takes practice, so just go practice tracking your subject. Start by keeping the subject centered. When you are good at that, you can move on to off center tracking for more creativity.
Your shutter speed as well as the effect you get will depend on the subjects speed. A human runner can easily be panned with a nice streaked background at 1/15th sec. An Indy race car will produce the same effect at 1/125th since the car is going 200 MPH!
all the best,
Pete

4/25/2008 6:07:07 PM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/21/2004
  no,no, no.
4 secs at a 1000ths shutter speed?ghosts?
an owners manual said that?
I don't care how big the pitchfork or shovel is,ya can't fling that much crap.
well now lets go messin.again.
1000ths at f4?well even at f5.6.might want f8 at 1/1200.
it was contradictory.
ya posted wrong henry the eighth.

4/25/2008 6:16:23 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 8/9/2005
 
 
 
Carlene,

Maybe a photo will help.

This car was travelling about 200 mph.

My shutter speed was 1/125th sec. That is a pretty fast pan. This is a difficult subject to pan.
Any verical movement while panning would have ruined this shot; hence the need to practice.

Attempting a successful pan on this car at 1/30th or slower would be pure luck to get a good shot..so you see, your shutter speed will totally depend on the subjects speed or movement.

Pete

4/25/2008 6:23:52 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  It's all in the "follow-through" (...just like golf.)
When you practice panning on moving objects, time your exposure to keep up with the speed of the passer-by so it will remain within the same portion of the frame during the time the shutter is open.
When you press the shutter on an SLR, the viewfinder will black out when the mirror flips up and the shutter opens. With a successful pan, you will see the subject re-appear in the same position in the viewfinder after the exposure ends.
The speed at which it's traveling (and also the distance from the subject to the background) will determine the degree of background blur you will achieve. Your practice session should include having your subject in the front third of the frame (...so it appears to be running or driving INTO the scene rather than OUT of it).
A good panning tripod head will eliminate camera-shake on those longer exposure times with slower subjects. As others have mentioned, this technique takes a good deal of practice to get decent results.

4/25/2008 7:18:23 PM

 
Carlene M. Shea

member since: 4/24/2008
  Thanks everyone for all your input...as I said, Im new at this and in utter confusion, but if time lets me, I will get it in the next while. Im trying to find time to get out and try some shots, I live in the country so finding anything moving faster than a slug is a task..that is unless I go to the drive through at Tims, lol, again thanks for the help and I will keep you posted on my progress!

4/26/2008 10:26:53 AM

 
W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
"Im new at this and in utter confusion"

Keep repeating that mantra and you will never learn.

So, forget that self-hypnosis and start enjoying the world around you through a viewfinder.

Good luck!

4/26/2008 10:34:33 AM

 
Carlene M. Shea

member since: 4/24/2008
  Im just stating the truth, I didnt say *I will never learn* Im merely saying that I am confused. I do know that with a little time I will get it all in my head and love it more than I do now! With the hectic job I have, taking photos is my way of giving myself a treat and a little of *me* time....loving it!!

4/26/2008 10:58:33 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  Carlene,
I know what you mean by "me time".
The time we spend behind our cameras is often the only thing that keeps us sane in a world gone crazy.

You've inadvertently given me an idea to possibly try one day...panning a slug or snail to show its motion.
No joke!
With a multi-second exposure time in extreme macro, it might indeed be possible to get a sharp subject against a blurred background.

Like Pete H. and I stated before, the speed of the subject (relative to the distance of the background) will determine the effective shutter speed to imply motion.
This should work...even if at a snail's pace.

4/26/2008 5:15:25 PM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 1/21/2004
  oh geeez,
what are you trying to pan?

4/26/2008 9:06:38 PM

 

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