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Photography Question 
Daryl R. Lucarelli
BetterPhoto Member
daryllucarelli.com

member since: 3/25/2004
 

Shooting JPEG and Raw ... At the Same Time


I have read and understand a medium amount about Raw. I usually always shoot in JPEG, because I am a little PS shy, but I can do layers, curves, masks, etc. Here is my question: Why do the new cameras shoot in Raw and JPEG at the same time? And when is this used best and why? And why not for that matter? Thanks.

1/6/2006 4:02:17 PM

 
Bob Fately

member since: 4/11/2001
  Daryl, the difference between the two formats is basically what the computer processor in the camera itself does once you snap the shutter.
Raw, as the name implies, is the essentially unadulterated data streamed off the CCD chip. Each manufacturer (and sometimes each model) has its own proprietary format of Raw, but in general, Raw files are not compressed - this means they're both bigger than JPEGs and, thus, fewer fit on a memory card, and are slower to load to the card. On the other hand, they are analogous to the concept of a negative, in that they contain all the data the CCD sensed which you can then manipulate later to improve shadow details, etc.
JPEG is a lossy compression scheme - meaning that you can save file space on the cards (thus fit more) and they can be loaded more quickly to the memory as well. They are created by the camera's processor, as per whatever instructions the manufacturer programmed there. They have less dynamic range, and, as JPEGs, can suffer new data loss each time they are saved and resaved. On the other hand, for many uses, the dynamic range is enough and the additional speediness and space savings are worth JPEG being used.
So, if you are shooting something all "artsy" and want the maximum amount of data to be able to play with in Photoshop, use Raw. If you're shooting snapshots of the family gathering, where prints won't be made larger than 5x7 anyway, use JPEG.
Now some cameras can save both formats simultaneously - so, for example, a wedding shooter could make quick & dirty proofs while still at the reception hall from the jpegs and still have the full-data Raw files to touch up and manipulate back at the lab.

1/6/2006 5:38:28 PM

 
Sharon  Day
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Sharon
Sharon 's Gallery

member since: 6/27/2004
  I like shooting both Raw and JPEG on vacation for the same reason. Instant feedback without the hassle of dealing with Raw files. I know of no easy way of viewing them in Windows without opening them in a Raw converter first. If you have a duplicate JPEG and Windows XP, you can just view them in Windows Picture and Fax Viewer and know what you have without all the hassle.

1/6/2006 8:40:59 PM

 

BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/28/2003
  I can shoot Raw for my main images, but also have a small JPEG for proofing and Web galleries. It's the best of both worlds.

1/7/2006 5:05:58 AM

 
Dirck Harris

member since: 4/9/2003
  Microsoft now has a RAW viewer available that can be downloaded so you can view RAW (or NEF, Nikon's version) files easily. You can get it here:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=d48e808e-b10d-4ce4-a141-5866fd4a3286&displaylang=en

Dirck Harris

1/10/2006 3:59:31 AM

 
Sharon L. Weeks
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/4/2002
  Actually, this is another question. When shooting in RAW, will using a Circular Polarizing filter screw things up? And if so, how?
Thanks
Sharon W

1/10/2006 7:44:57 AM

 
Bob Fately

member since: 4/11/2001
  Sharon, in short - no - as these are two unrelated issues.

Polarizing filters cut out certain light rays; circular polarizers are necesary with modern cameras so as not to confuse their auto-focus and metering systems.

RAW is merely a file format, in essence; different from TIF or JPEG or the dozens of other graphical file formats but just a format nonetheless.

1/10/2006 8:19:20 AM

 
Sharon L. Weeks
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 10/4/2002
  Thank you, Bob. I guess I should have known that! Am new to RAW so am dancing around it. Will be ready to dive in as soon as my new camera gets here! Thanks again.
Sharon

1/10/2006 8:26:50 AM

 
Daryl R. Lucarelli
BetterPhoto Member
daryllucarelli.com

member since: 3/25/2004
  Bob, Sharon, Jerry, and Dick- Thanks so much for your responses and input....this is all very helpful and I really do appreciate your time and effort here in helping out. Thanks. Daryl

1/10/2006 9:19:40 AM

 
James R. Glidewell

member since: 7/5/2002
  "I know of no easy way of viewing them in Windows without opening them in a Raw converter first."

Microsoft now has an add-on for Windows Explorer that allows you to view raw files as thunbnails. I'm not sure where it is so you may have to look around a little on the Microsoft site. It may be part of the Power Toys or something.

1/11/2006 7:15:00 AM

 
Gen Nagase
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/31/2003
  Microsoft Window Explorer's RAW image viewer does not support all types of RAW image files.
I have not found the complete list of supported cameras, but if you have (more or less) high end Canon or Nikon, it's really good.

1/11/2006 7:52:23 AM

 
Gen Nagase
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 5/31/2003
  The location of the add-on is posted above by Dirck,..., it's at:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=d48e808e-b10d-4ce4-a141-5866fd4a3286&displaylang=en

1/11/2006 8:07:43 AM

 
Don Guilmette

member since: 1/27/2006
  I heard that you can use the raw+L (uncompress)the "smooth one" to shoot B&W and you'll get the raw in B&W and the jpeg L in color..

1/27/2006 6:07:46 PM

 

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