BetterPhoto.com - Become a better photographer today!
EMAIL:
PASSWORD:
remember me:     
     


BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

To participate in the Forum, become a BetterPhoto member or Sign In.

 
Photography Question 
Hope Anderson

member since: 11/12/2005
 

Picturing People Wearing Eyeglasses


How do you take a picture of a child with eyeglasses and not get a reflection of the glasses?

11/23/2005 4:59:31 AM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/4/2004
  There are a few tips to photographing anyone with glasses.
- First make sure your subject's body is angled - and that you have brought their nose around so you have full eyes.
- Make sure the glasses are all the way back on the nose.
- Have them lean towards you - this would be from the waist.
- Lower the subject a little or raise the lights a tad more.
Try these things - one or all should help. A person who wears glasses 75 percent of their day should be photographed in them.
And a little light on the very top of the frame is acceptable if you can't get rid of it.
I do hope this helps.
Debby Tabb

11/23/2005 6:08:15 AM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/3/2005
  Or try a circular polarizer filter. It cuts off glare on cars with shiny chrome ... great ...
Craig-

11/23/2005 8:14:38 AM

 
Jason Kesselring
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 11/14/2005
  If you know the person wears glasses before the shoot, you can ask them to bring frames without lenses in them. Or you can tilt the glasses down a bit as well.

11/23/2005 8:26:53 AM

 
Craig m. Zacarelli
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/3/2005
  Just have them remove the offending glasses.
Craig

11/23/2005 9:23:44 AM

 
Elzbieta Stanczak

member since: 8/31/2005
  What kind of pictures do you have in mind? Candid? Studio portraits? I try not to use flash at all (unless it's off the camera or the child is not looking straight into camera - if it's not reflecting off the lenses, it usually reflects off frames and produces at least some glare). I usually use natural light only and try to remember that the angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection. It is simple but you will need a lot of practice; I practiced with some good results - my daughter has been wearing glasses full time since she was 15 months and she is 6.5 now). But still when we go to have her pictures taken (Passport only - renowned photo studio in DC area)- they still have problems, and we usually don't like the results, and they use flash for this kind of photos.

11/28/2005 2:07:46 PM

 
Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/17/2005
  Hi Hope!
The rule is that angle of incidence = angle of reflection, as Debby said. The trick to photographing people with eye glasses is to ensure that your lights aren't set to bounce reflections directly back into your lens, producing a fireball in the subjects lenses. If you're using an on-camera dedicated flash (like a Polaroid passport camera), then you're going to have some problems and sure, at that point, you'd probably do better using available light.
A polarizer has little value in these situations unless you can adjust it while your light source is actually on. Otherwise, you're just guessing at the setting for both lights and filter. Unless you have modeling lights on your strobes, that's pretty tough to do. Even if you don't use strobes with a modeling light (to enable you to actually see if there is any glare or reflection before releasing the shutter), you can try setting up some sort of strong directional light, for example, a photo flood in a clamp-on socket, attached right next to your lighting source. Looking through the viewfinder at your subject, if you don't see your flood light reflected in the subject's glasses, you'll probably avoid the glare/reflection.
If you do use strobes with modeling lights, then all you need to do is adjust either the light or subject or camera angle to the subject or all three until you no longer the modeling lights reflected in their glasses. Lastly, what I always do in such cases is take some with their glasses on and some off. Glasses can make a good prop for the subject to hold, depending on your framing.
Seewhatimeanhuh?
Mark

11/28/2005 2:40:33 PM

 
anonymous A. 

member since: 9/19/2005
 
 
 
If you still have glare on the specks after following all this good advise, or want to fix existing photos, you can select the lenses in your editing program and either reduce the saturation, selectively clone out the reflections, or if the eyes are too obscured, clone them in from another source....

11/30/2005 10:56:26 AM

 
anonymous A. 

member since: 9/19/2005
 
 
 
If you still have glare on the specks after following all this good advice, or want to fix existing photos: Select the lenses in your editing program and either reduce the saturation, selectively clone out the reflections, or if the eyes are too obscured, clone them in from another source ...

11/30/2005 10:56:44 AM

 
Rhonda L. Tolar

member since: 3/19/2004
  This is what I learned in one of my photography classes: If you need the flash, take the subject's glasses and tilt the ear pieces up, just a little - it reduces that angle of reflection they were talking about before.
If you have enough available light and are just using the flash to get the catchlights in the eyes ... here is another trick my teacher told us
Point your flash straight up, and attach a white plastic spoon on the back of it. Just where the bowl of the spoon comes over the top. The flash will bounce off the spoon just enough to put the catch lights in the eyes. It won't be enough light to provide any fill flash, though.
Good luck!

11/30/2005 12:05:39 PM

 

To participate in the Forum, become a BetterPhoto member or Sign In.
 

Copyright 1996-2014 BetterPhoto.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved.