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Photography QnA: Problems with Images

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Category: What's Wrong With My Photographic Technique? : Problems with Images

Have questions regarding resizing photos for websites? How about taking pictures without shadows? Check this section out to find some answers.

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Photography Question 
Tom R. Fleeman

member since: 4/26/2010
  21 .  aspect ratio
I need help with aspect ratio. I don't have a good grasp of this. I shoot a Nikon D7000 crop sensor. What sizes should I be offering to sale. I know some 8 x 10s are cropped bad. They don't fit the 8 x 10 frames at all. Is there somewhere I can look that would tell me what sizes I should offer that would fit what size frames? Thanks for any help.

Tom

8/12/2012 6:35:07 AM

  Tom, there's a long discussion (read through -- lots of stuff near the end) on this thread which I found through Google:
http://www.photographytalk.com/forum/freelance-photography/44800-aspect-ratio-vs-standard-matframe-sizes

Hope you get some answers there ...

8/12/2012 10:31:02 AM

Christopher J. Budny
BetterPhoto Member
chrisbudny.com

member since: 10/3/2005
  Hi Tom; is your out-of-the-camera image in the ratio of 2x3? (ie, my untouched Canon files are 5,184 x 3,456 pixels, which is 2x3 ratio.) Without cropping, that image can be enlarged to any other 2x3 ratio size, such as 4x6, 8x12, 24x36, etc. Some 2x3 ratios are common in frame/mat shops, so you don't have to go custom all the time on frame or mat purchases. Of course, you can crop to any other ratio you like, from square to other rectangles. But you need to be thinking about those possible crops at the time you compose the image in the camera--so that you build in enough "throw away" space to support your crop later, without cutting into the main subject.
Ready-made frames and mats come in so many sizes and ratios now, you should be able to accommodate quite a lot of variety---provided you're composing with enough breathing room to make those crops, later!

8/12/2012 7:15:07 PM

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Photography Question 
William West

member since: 7/24/2006
  22 .  How to Photograph Balloons with Studio Flash
I need some guidance on photographing balloons. In short, I will be shooting a subject against a black background. She will have balloons next to her. I have three strobes at my disposal.
While prepping for the shoot this evening, I took some practice shots using balloons similar to those we'll be using on the day of the shoot. I tried a single light with a beauty dish first - the highlights on the balloons were super hot - way too much. I tried a 46-inch octagonal softbox - still, the highlights are large and blown.
Before I continue with trial-and-error shooting, I thought I should ask the experts here! :-) Any advice? I want to minimize the highlights on the balloons as much as possible.
Thank you,
bill

8/8/2012 9:29:44 PM

  Hi Bill,
Balloons are difficult to shoot, as is any shiny spherical object. The key is to use a very large light source, like you were using a tent around a small piece of jewelry. I would bounce a light off of a large piece of white seamless paper, say 9X9 feet. This will give you a large highlight without a hot spot. Because the light source is large, the highlight will be much closer in value to the rest of the balloon. However you do the job, a large light modifier close to the balloons will work much better than a smaller light or a light at a greater distance.
Thanks,

8/10/2012 1:46:30 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Did you experiment with different angles also? You're always going to get a bright highlight, but if your light angle moves the highlight to the side, you might be more satisfied with that than if the highlight is towards the middle.

8/10/2012 3:05:28 PM

William West

member since: 7/24/2006
  Thanks everyone for your help.

With respect to angle - yes, I noticed I can hide some of the highlights by moving around the balloons. So I'm trying now to imagine how to set the lights and camera angle in such a way that hides the highlights as much as possible while also avoiding unintended spillover of the balloon lights onto the model, as well as getting the correct angle on the model and achieving the mood I want to create! :-)

8/10/2012 3:14:58 PM

Greg McCroskery
BetterPhoto Member
imagismphotos.com

member since: 2/27/2003
  Bill,

If I were shooting the session you describe, I would try layering two different shots in Photoshop. Shoot your subject with lighting set up for the best portrait lighting -- disregard the balloon highlights. Then do an ambient light photo using a large reflective surface to light the balloons -- you could do this shot without the subject even in the image, beforehand.

In Photoshop simply adjust the ambient exposure so that the background matches the flash lit exposure, and combine them doing a 'copy and paste', or layer and erase technique.

Assuming the balloons are relatively stationary, it should be an easy image to produce.

God Bless,
Greg

8/15/2012 6:49:22 AM

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Photography Question 
Tom R. Fleeman

member since: 4/26/2010
  23 .  camera focus
 
  not crisp!
not crisp!
Shot in part sun,f/5.6,1/1250,ISO-500,112MM, 5:31PM.
© Tom R. Fleeman
Nikon D7000 Digita...
 
Hi everyone. I think I have a focus problem with my camera or lenses. Most of my shots don't look crisp like I see a lot of shots online. How would I be able to check if I have (back or front focus) I have heard about online with Nikon cameras. I have D7000 and shoot with a #1986 80-200mm f/2.8 lense and hardly ever are my photos real crisp. Please help with any ideas. Thanks Tom

8/6/2012 10:50:32 AM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  First I'd like to find out if you're new to using digital cameras and know about the sharpening that needs to be done, and is done, to all digital shots because of the filter over the sensor that helps to prevent moire. Some people just don't know that you have to add some amount of sharpening to give a digital shot that edge sharpness.
You can check your focus by using a stationary object, something linear, and focusing on a point and seeing how it looks on the monitor. You can set up a line of objects on a table, use a tape measure, a pole or post outside, anything that you can see if the point of focus matches to where the camera picks.
Your baseball photo doesn't seem to be off. I'm not seeing a point of focus on the ground that is too far behind or in front of either of the players. You didn't indicate if that is a uncropped photo, auto focus or not. I'm also wondering if you're comparing that particular photo to something you've seen that was a tighter shot. If you're closer physically or closer because of a longer focal length, you're going to be able to see more texture detail, like in the glove, the hair, or fabric, than you would in a photo that's framed like your sample.
I don't spend much time browsing thru forums, but I've never heard of Nikons having a habit of having focus accuracy problems.

8/6/2012 1:13:55 PM

  As Gregory mentioned I also do not see anything wrong with your focus. For that matter your 26 year old lens that was designed for film does a superb job.

I believe that you are expecting results that are the same as those taken by experienced amateurs that specialize in Sports photography or Professional sports photographers. Both use both the best cameras and the highest quality lenses that they can get for their cameras. They operate their equipment without even thinking about it because they have done it so many times it is only natural for them.

Most use Full Frame cameras or in case of Canon some use the 4D which has a 1.3x crop whereas your camera has a 1.5x crop. The smaller sensor DOES make a difference. Their lenses start at 400mm and go up. In some cases up and up. $$$$$ :=) They also shoot wide open to make the DOF smaller therefore isolating the players even more. Also they have a little more room to move around which comes in handy especially when you are stuck in the bleachers.

Here is what you could have done to improve your photo. First shoot wide open. Second; the person in the background adds nothing to the photo. And finally third; zoom the full extent of your lens or nearly so. Do not be afraid to shoot in the vertical format although for this picture and your angle I doubt if it would have worked in this situation.

Considering your equipment and where you were, you did a fine job of capturing the action of the moment.


Lynn

8/6/2012 8:57:58 PM

  Oooops! The Canon should have been the 1D Mark IV. Also shoot RAW and when you sharpen have the photo at 100%. Be careful not to over sharpen. That is a problem we didn't have with film because we focused on the film grain.


Lynn

8/6/2012 9:07:05 PM

Tom R. Fleeman

member since: 4/26/2010
  Hi Lynn and Gregory. Thanks for your response. I have been shooting for about two years. Sports is my favorite but getting ready to do portrait photos also. Maybe I am too critical of my photos. I have Lightroom 3 for post processing, but haven't had to long just learning how to use it. And yes I am aware of sharpening, but just getting into lightroom. I think it will probably do a much better job of everything than what I have been doing. Thanks again both of you for the help and advise, I will use it to improve my skills. Thanks Tom.

8/8/2012 7:28:11 AM

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Photography Question 
Wendy Wyatt
shootinstarphoto.com

member since: 11/22/2008
  24 .  Covered Arena/Red Eye
 
I'm shooting my first barrel race in a covered arena. My quality stinks and I can't get rid of the "red eye" in the horses with my photo shop red eye tool. How can I make this subject much sharper and get rid of the reflection in the horses eye?

6/23/2012 5:59:39 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Had a explanation written out and thought of something that made think to start over before I hit the submit button. Tell what aperture and sync speed(shutter speed) you were using at the time of these pictures. And what mode you set the camera to. I don't know if the 1Ds has a program mode.
Judging from the pictures, it looks like you're in an in between area with the light in the arena, iso 800, and the strength of your flash. Only one picture looks like you're getting enough light from the flash. The other two you're basically getting just the available light. And they're a little under exposed.
So your flash doesn't seem to be strong enough to reach the distances you're aiming for. That could be due to what power setting you had it on, or what mode you had it on. So you're in between not enough available light for iso 800 to get a fast enough shutter speed to cut down the motion blur, but it gives you most of your exposure. And not enough light from the flash that you could use that to help freeze the motion and get a good exposure.
Now to get rid of the red eye, use the elliptical selection tool on the red part and desaturate the color out of it so that it looks like a regular catch light.

6/23/2012 7:37:37 PM

Wendy Wyatt
shootinstarphoto.com

member since: 11/22/2008
  I had it in manual mode, should I put it in Program? F2.8 at 250 was its limit.

6/23/2012 7:59:39 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Okay. Ordinarily I would say don't use program. But depending on what flash you have, if it's dedicated to Canon and has thru the lens metering, it might actually work.
But you are in that in between area. There's enough available light to get most of the exposure at iso 800, but not enough to give you a fast enough shutter speed and get a complete exposure.
And your flash wasn't strong enough to reach the distances.
So what you can do is try an iso of 400, and use a higher power setting on the flash. Reducing the iso will take some the exposure away from the ambient light and shift it to needing to come from the flash. And hopefully you'll be able to increase the power of it, because it already wasn't enough at iso 800. That way, some of the action stopping will come from the flash duration.
250 is a pretty good sync speed, so we can live with that. You still may get some ghosting.
Or you could try the highest iso setting your camera has and try going without flash. You may be able to get 1/500 if you take it up to iso 3200.
And also they seem to be out of focus. That will help improve the sharpness of them.

6/23/2012 8:29:42 PM

Wendy Wyatt
shootinstarphoto.com

member since: 11/22/2008
  Do you happen to know if a Canon Speedlite 580EX II is compatible with a EOS 1 Mark II? I've been reading my flash manual, and wonder if it's even compatible. Even though it fires and I can change some settings, when it comes to the symbol that is suppose to show up on my LCD monitor that means its compatible, it's not showing.

6/23/2012 9:45:15 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Canon website says E-TTL operation with all Canon digital slr cameras. However it also says the ability to control flash functions and settings from the camera menu is 1D mach III only. So I think that's the reason the symbol you're looking for is not there.
I'm used to using manual on my flash when it comes to using flash with a telephoto and action. And if your flash has a distance scale on the back, you can go that direction as another way of doing it. You can use the lens to find the distance of locations that you'll most likely get your pictures. And use the flash distance scale to determine which power level to use based aperture you want to use and how much available light there is.

6/24/2012 2:36:49 PM

Wendy Wyatt
shootinstarphoto.com

member since: 11/22/2008
  Sorry ,how do you do all that?

6/24/2012 5:17:12 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
 

If I felt I had to or it would be better to use flash, I'd decide which iso to use based on what I'd get with just available light. Like if iso 800 wouldn't quite get me the shutter speed I want, I might try iso 800 with flash, or drop down and use flash. And that would be for the reasons I said above about sometimes, based on light and sync speed, you might need to set things so that you're not in that in between area of not being able to freeze motion enough with not enough available light alone, and too much with available light and flash together.
So if I decided to use iso 400, I'd set the iso/f stop scale to 400. Second, using your barrel racing as an example, I'd use the lens to estimate distances. This is where I'm shooting from, that's where the horses circle around the barrels, you focus on the spots and check the lens to estimate how far it is.
If I were doing something like a football game, I'd judge it by knowing how much of the frame I wanted to fill with the players with the photos, and standing in this position I'll typically be at a good range for how most of the action plays out. So I wouldn't try shooting when somebody is say, head to toe in the frame, taking up less the half the viewfinder. I may still follow the action, focusing and being ready, but wouldn't bother taking a picture till the action came closer. Or I'd move closer before the play starts.
Third, once I estimated my distances, I'd choose a power setting that gave me enough to reach it with the extra amount of light from the flash. So using how the flash is set to in the picture, say iso 400 gave me a shutter speed around 100th at f/2.8. And I found that my shooting distance was around the 50-80 ft range. My sync speed is going to be higher than 100th, and that means using a power level that gives a little extra. And I see that 1/4 power is around f/2.8 for the distance I'm doing.
So I am going to get some exposure from available light, but because of the sync speed under exposing ambient light, and getting extra light from the flash but not quite enough for a f/2.8 aperture at that distance, you end up with a good combination.
It takes some practince and getting used to, and you're also going to be depending on some of the exposure latitude if you try it. I know it may sound like a whole lot, especially typing it out, but it really is something that when you start doing it more, you get a feel for it and know "this is my shutter speed in this kind of light, this is my sync speed, so if I use this power level on the flash, this is how my pictures will look".

6/25/2012 8:32:05 AM

Wendy Wyatt
shootinstarphoto.com

member since: 11/22/2008
  Thank you soooooo much, I'll try it this week and see what happens before the big barrel race the first weekend in July. Never have had to shoot without the sunlight. Nerve racking! Thank you again. I'm printing this all out and taking it with me.

6/25/2012 10:15:23 AM

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Photography Question 
Shannon Whit
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2011
  25 .  HOW TO GET CLEAR, SHARP, FOCUSED, NON BLURRY PHOTO
I would really like to go wherever I'm shooting and have 95%, if not 100%, of my pictures be sharp and crispy clear. I am not! All my gear is less than a year and I've been seriously shooting for a year so I'm certain it's me. I'm working with a Canon 7d, 24-70mm 2.8L USM, 100-400mm f4.5-5.6L USM and an 85mm. I also own a mono and tripod which I dont use everytime.I know what I'm using is decent glass. I enjoy shooting action, portraits, flowers and kids. Without seeing a sample of photos can someone tell me why I might have so many "soft" "hazy" non razor sharp pictures? Just yesterday I shot a matial arts event and many of my pics were hit & miss. My settings were TV, between 200 & 250 speed. It was indoors with all sorts of lighting -- fluorescent, mirrors reflecting my flash, lots of outside light coming in on one side of the room (north of the boxers), south of them the room was quite dim. I drove myself nuts constantly changing the ISO and speed based on where in the room I actually shot them. I was all over the place with my shooting performance. This happens too often. A week ago I was in St. Martin shooting carnival. This time outdoors at high noon until 5 PM. I wanted the eyes to be my sharpest in all the photos. Some had, most were too soft. Other event was my daughter's 8th grade dance -- some outside at 530 in the evening, the rest at night indoors. Eyes are just not as sharp as they need to be. Potentially pretty but hazy photos. Am I just moving too much? HELP!!! Thanks a million!!!

5/24/2012 9:24:49 PM

Shannon Whit
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2011
  I should've read my post before pressing send. I apologize for my spelling and grammar errors!!

5/24/2012 9:43:24 PM

  Shannon, you have got some impressive gear (camera & lenses).

From your description above, I *see* that you shoot in quite challenging lighting conditions and on top of it your subjects are moving i.e you are trying to not only freeze motion but also be able to focus on the eyes of a moving subject so they are tack sharp. IT IS NOT EASY TO ACCOMPLISH SO YOU ARE NOT ALONE !!!

Here is what I'll do:

1. Find the sweet spot (aperture) of all your lenses, its usually between F/7.1 to F/11 for many of the lenses) and try shooting with this f/stop. This will mostly work for outdoor events with reasonable daylight and will not work if you are shooting in low lighting conditions, such as interior.

2. Raise your ISO as much as you reasonably can, specially for inside shots, this will help you give a faster shutter speed for freezing action.

3. Add a battery grip to your camera body, which will give you more frames/second on your 7D, this will increase your chances of getting a decent action shot.

4. Focusing on the eyes of a moving subject is the most difficult of the above and requires a lot of practice, practice, and practice.

5. And shoot hundreds of frame when shooting sports or other action, its what the pros do too.

Getting 95% of the low-light action shots sharp and crispy clear is well beyond the capability of the current camera gear available in the market, IMHO.

My 02 cents :)

UB.

5/24/2012 10:19:37 PM

Christopher J. Budny
BetterPhoto Member
chrisbudny.com

member since: 10/3/2005
  I seldom photograph people or action, so I'm sure I'm not the best to chime in---however, you said your shots were between 1/200th and 1/250th... but you didn't say what lens. Those speeds may not be fast enough to reliably eliminate camera movement handheld, if say, you were using the zoom at 300 or 400mm. And for martial arts, you may want something to really freese motion, say, 1/500th or faster? Generally, 1-over-the-focal-length is a rule of thumb to eliminate camera motion blur (assuming you're a steady shooter.) But if you're in TV mode, and you dial in say, 1/400, I thought the camera will adjust ISO for you (or adjust aperture)? Not sure why you'd have to constantly change the ISO yourself?

You may also be having trouble hitting the exact focus mark you want or need---what autofocus setting are you using on the camera? If you're on the teensy precision-spot focus mode, you may want to select one of the broader modes, or the zone option instead and give that a try?

And of course, as you no doubt know, every photo has to be further sharpened in post-processing! ;)

5/25/2012 7:03:54 AM

Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member
cammphoto.com

member since: 7/17/2003
  Given your list of equipment, I too would have to default your dilemma to "human error"...sorry.

A fast shutter, and a critically focused subject, are the requisite ingredients for success with action sequences.
Perhaps stepping up the ISO (manually), then trusting your own reflexes to trip the shutter while your auto-focus takes control might help.
Personally though, I'd flip off the auto focus, use manual focus, concentrate critical focus on my primary point of reference...then fire a burst of shots at 1/500 second or faster when the action ensues.

5/25/2012 2:52:50 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  It's better to help a studying baker if they let you taste the cake. Otherwise you'll get a long list of possible explanations.
Lenses do have the spots where things are sharpest, but they may not necessarily apply to what you find wrong with your pictures. It may not even be something that if you did use the "sweet spot" aperture, that you would tell right away. Which it seems you're looking at your pictures, and it's immediate that you feel "that's not right".
One thing when people complain about lack of sharpness is they may mean not sharp as is not in focus, or not sharp as in blurred. If it's focus, the first thing I'd suggest is go back to your pictures and see if there is any spot that seems to be sharp. Any picture from the carnival where you look at the eyes, they're not sharp enough, but maybe the ear is. Or the hair is a good place to look. Think about what people were doing at the time you took the picture, including you. If you were using auto focus, maybe you were using focus lock, and somebody moved afterwards. Or the al servo was hunting. If you weren't using auto focus, your technique and/or timing could need some work.
Depending on focal length and f/stop, even I've got pictures that can show you how you can have one eye is clearly the point of focus and the other isn't.
If the martial arts are from motion blur, look at the photos and compare the background to the fighters. If the background is okay but the fighters a blurry, then you might just need a faster shutter speed. If the background or anything that wasn't moving is blurry, you're not steady enough + a faster shutter speed. Look to see if in any of the pictures, the body looks okay, but the hands, feet, maybe the head are too blurry. Better timing and technique can help that.
Anything you call haze, maybe that's coming from some back lighting. Glare from the flash in the mirror. Or if the windows were really big, too much wrap around light.
And like Chris said, you do need to add some sharpening because of the high pass filter thing that covers the sensor. That's something that comes with digital.

5/25/2012 2:57:18 PM

Shannon Whit
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 9/8/2011
  Hi all!!

Thank you soooo much for your valuable responses! I sure do appreciate it!!! I'm reading, rereading, making notes and will be practicing this weekend. Now, my follow up question: taking action shots out of the equation... Making regular portrait shots, let's say outdoors... Getting them focused as well... Your input please. Thanks again!!

P.S. I did not know that photos needed to be further sharpened in post processing. I have not learned nor purchased editing software just yet because I really wanna learn what I need to learn and practice as much as I need to practice before moving on to that aspect...

5/25/2012 8:28:24 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Didn't your camera come with something, like a basic version of Photoshop? What's on the Digital solutions disk that's listed as coming with the camera?
Doing regular portraits, the same fundamentals apply. If you're using auto focus, you have to be aware if your focusing points are reading the right area, depending on the narrowness of the depth of field. If you're using manual focus, you have to be aware if you're actually focused on the right spot and not maybe just a little off. That can take some time to get the hang off if you've switched to a better lens. Or to a camera with a brighter viewfinder. What may in the moment look to be on point is actually just slightly off but looking thru better optics in the viewfinder. Until you look at the pictures on screen and find the focus point is a little ahead or behind what you were initially aiming for.
You can practice manually focusing by trying to focus on things around the house Switching between things far away to close, and mixing in things that are slight differences in distances. All while trying to do quickly. You can practice follow focusing on traffic going by.
If you use auto focus, try experimenting with a different number focusing points.

5/26/2012 8:53:11 AM

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Photography Question 
Jaime A. Schulz
BetterPhoto Member
jaimeann-designs-photography.com

member since: 6/27/2007
  26 .  Getting Large Groups Shots to be in Focus
I will be doing a large group of 30 plus people portrait session. Im having a heck of a time now getting all the people in foucs when I do small group shot like at a wedding. I have a Nikon D5100 and have read lots on it but its just not working for me. This will be outdoors. Here is a list of my equipment and settings Ive tried. PLEASE HELP with tips on exact camera modes/settings, which lense is better...

Gear:
Nikon D5100
Lenses Nikkor AF-S 35mm 1:1.8G
Tamrom 17-50mm F2.8
Nikon Spead Light SB-900

Settings Used:
AF-S / Metering (Matrix) / AF (Area Mode)
Shoot in Aperture

Any tips on what other set your camera to for group shots outside and then inside a low lit area would be GREAT!!

Cheers,
Jaime

5/15/2012 4:26:19 PM

Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  How you group them can make things easier. If you can fit 8 in a row, with four rows back that's 32 total people. Outside you can use the flash so that with the sunlight, you get a small aperture. More depth of field.
Indoors you might have a place so that you can shoot down on the crowd, thereby decreasing the differences in the distance from where you shoot from to the front and back row.

5/15/2012 5:01:57 PM

  Jamie, for the size of the group ie., 30 plus you'll be shooting at, I'll pick the Tamron only because of its wide angle reach, and especially so when shooting indoors in cramped spaces. The Nikor 35mm on your cropped camera is actually a 52mm on a full frame, a difficult focal length when taking shots of a group as large as you have here. You'll have to zoom out with your legs and resultantly the faces of the people may become too small on print. Therefore, I will also try shooting with the Nikor 18-55mm (if you have one) which comes with the Nikon bodies as a standard lens. Its fabulous glass, and in my experience it does a great job of shooting groups.

Shoot at f/8 or above. Ideally find the sweet spot of this lens which should be somewhere between f/8 to f/11 and trying shooting that in your test runs and shoot test shots on the exact spot (both indoors and outdoors) at the exact time of day you intend to do the real shooting. Shooting f/8 or above will ensure that you achieve a reasonable dof so that all the group members are in sharp focus.

Make sure that you shoot in RAW both outdoors and especially when shooting indoors. Put the WB to "sunlight" when shooting outdoors, even when you are shooting in the shade outdoors. For indoors either shoot in Auto WB setting or depending on the type of lights indoors, adjust you WB accordingly.

Since this is quite a large group, make sure to capture at least 5-10 shots to avoid unintentional funny expressions, moving hands/heads, closed eyes, etc. Before you shoot tell them to remain still, look into the camera, and depending on the occasion ask them to give you a nice smile ;)

If you have no choice but to shoot on bright sunny day outside without shade, suggest to use the speed light and if possible a side-light from slightly above the group in order to avoid unwanted shadows on the faces.

Gregory is right wrt the rows formations. If possible,let the shorter people stand/sit in the front row and medium ones in the middle rows and the taller ones in the rows behind. Focus on a person who is almost dead center of the group.

Wish you all the best. Let us know how did it go once its done.

UB.

5/15/2012 9:34:15 PM

Jaime A. Schulz
BetterPhoto Member
jaimeann-designs-photography.com

member since: 6/27/2007
  Thanks Gregory that make sense with lining them up and focus in the middle or 1/3 back from the front. Usman, Thanks for your tips as well. I only have these lenses. I have to purchase them separate when buying my camera so it didn't come with a lens. Do you think a longer lens would be beneficial for large group shots or outdoor wedding group shots to get them in better focus??? I will play around with my f-stops and find its sweet spot! I only shoot in jpeg. Im not familiar and have not ever shot in raw and really dont want to start now. I know some people say it the best, but Im been trained in jpeg and only have software for this.

My questions still now is on the camera settings.

AF-S or AF-C or AF-A / Metering (Matrix) or (Single Point) / AF (Area Mode) (Single Point Area)

WHAT SHOULD I REALLY BE SETTINGS BE FOR A GROUP SHOT???

THANKS MUCH FOR THE HELP!
Jaime

5/16/2012 7:12:22 AM

  Its never too late, Jamie. Start shooting in RAW. I believe the RAW converter can be downloaded from Adobe's site as Adobe Camera RAW, make sure to download the latest version, and its FREE too. It is specially useful when shooting in low light conditions.

The Nikor 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 costs just around a 100 bucks, which is extremely cheap when it comes to buying Nikon glass!!

Now coming direct to the settings, here is what I'll choose:
AF-S (Auto Focus - Stationary/Single) which makes sense as the group will hopefully be standing/sitting still.
AF-C (Auti Focus - Continuous) is usually used for focusing on moving objects. You don't need this here.

For metering, I'll select the Center weighted, I am assuming you will compose the group shots putting the people in the center of the frame. However, you may also want to check the Matrix metering option too, as it gives very good results in places where there are not much difference in dark and shiny areas.

Since I am not a pro photographer and have only been shooting friends/family groups lately, so I am also learning.

I am sure someone else with greater experience/expertise will also chime in soon.

Hope this helps.

UB.

UB.

5/17/2012 3:16:56 AM

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Photography Question 
Diane L. Thomas
BetterPhoto Member
dlthomasphotography.com

member since: 4/21/2004
  27 .  batch editing
Is there a way to batch edit all photo's in lightroom 3.2.

3/11/2012 4:08:02 AM

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Photography Question 
Diane L. Thomas
BetterPhoto Member
dlthomasphotography.com

member since: 4/21/2004
  28 .  lightroom
I bought lightroom 3.2 and when I take to CS3 to edit it works great but when I save the photo I can't save as a jpeg. It only saves as a Tiff. then I can't upload to FB or anywhere. How do I get around this.

3/8/2012 9:27:32 AM

Christopher J. Budny
BetterPhoto Member
chrisbudny.com

member since: 10/3/2005
  Are you running into a problem with 8-bit vs 16-bit? I seem to recall 16-bit mode won't allow JPG, but 8-bit will. (ie, in Photoshop anyway, its under Image... Mode) and you can drop to 8-bit. Then "JPG" becomes an option in the File... Save As menu.

3/8/2012 1:24:32 PM

Diane L. Thomas
BetterPhoto Member
dlthomasphotography.com

member since: 4/21/2004
  OK I'll try that and let you know. thanks.

3/8/2012 5:15:07 PM

Diane L. Thomas
BetterPhoto Member
dlthomasphotography.com

member since: 4/21/2004
  Thank you Christopher, you solved my problem. It worked great.

3/11/2012 4:04:50 AM

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Photography Question 
Frank P. Luongo
Contact Frank
Frank's Gallery
francislphotography.com

member since: 6/7/2004
  29 .  How to transfer photos from Gallery to Deluxe webs
 
I have a gallery that has been inactive for about 10 years over to a new deluxe website?
I was swept by the digital age.
Now I have hudreds of photos stored in my computer hard drive I also want to I also want to upload.

2/28/2012 10:30:58 AM

Christopher J. Budny
BetterPhoto Member
chrisbudny.com

member since: 10/3/2005
  Hi Frank... I think I follow your question---I see 9 images in your "Basic Gallery"---if you want those displayed (and any others you'd previously uploaded to BP in the past) in your new Deluxe Gallery, you should be able to do this:

1. Go to your Basic Gallery Member Center.
2. Click the link there for "Admin Center" of your Deluxe Website.
3. Once there, click the tab near the top center for "Photos"
4. On the next screen, under "Photo Categories", click "Select & Categorize"

That should give you a searchable view into all the photos you've ever uploaded to BP under your Basic Gallery. You can then choose which to "activate" for display in your new gallery. You can also create albums/categories, to group themes, etc.

For uploading, not much has changed. There is a bulk uploader tool, and a single-image uploader as well; once uploaded, just go to your Admin Center again, to activate/categorize, etc.

2/28/2012 11:03:23 AM

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Photography Question 
Nancy Barnhart
Contact Nancy
Nancy's Gallery

member since: 8/7/2007
  30 .  locked images
I am trying to access a photo for a course assignment and can't. It is on a cd and it says it's locked when I go to save it.
I use google chrome...what do I do to unlock the photos?
THANKS.
Nancy

2/16/2012 4:41:07 PM

Christopher J. Budny
BetterPhoto Member
chrisbudny.com

member since: 10/3/2005
  Are you trying to save the file back onto the CD, because you probably can't do that---unless the CD is a rewritable one, and your CD drive burns discs.
Have you tried saving the image to your hard drive/C: drive? Or copying it from the CD to C: first, before opening it?
Is this a BP course, by chance? (Perhaps you will need to contact the instructor, if so.)

2/17/2012 5:48:07 AM

  Thank-you Christopher.

You have a great eye for design in your photos! Wonderful.

Thanks again.

Nancy

2/17/2012 7:01:37 AM

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