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Miriam 02

 
 
David J. Ebert     Awesome Picture! I would love to know how you kept the flowers in colour. Did you recolour a B&W or cut and paste - or what!!! THUMBS UP!!


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10/20/2004 8:10:13 AM

 
Oscar J. Martinez
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/3/2003
 

David: Thanks for your comments. It is very easy to do this effect with Photoshop. Just open the picture, duplicate the layer, go to Image, then go to adjustments, then go to Hue/Saturation and make the picture black and white. Then take the eraser and start erasing the object you want in color. What happens here is that you are erasing the layer you have in black and white, and you will see the layer behind (in color). Save it, and that's it. More questions? Do not hesitate to write. Maybe somebody expert in PS can tell us how to do this better that I am explaining.


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10/20/2004 11:26:00 AM

 
Marianne Jensen
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/9/2003
 

There are several ways to "Colorize" in Photoshop. Here's one more. This method results in a smaller file and a little better Black and White image:

  • Open your image in Photoshop (full version). Click on the "new adjustment layer" icon at the bottom of the Layers Palette. (It looks like a circle that is half white/half black).
  • Choose "Channel Mixer". A dialog box will come up. Look to the bottom left of the box and click "monochrome". Click OK and your image is now Black and White.
  • Open your Layers Palette and note your new adjustment layer. It comes with a Layer Mask.
  • Simply put: A white mask allows the adjustment to show. A black mask turns the adjustment off.
  • The colors on your Tools Palette should be black and white. Press D on your keyboard if they are not. Now choose a soft brush about the size of the area you want to bring color back to.
  • Look at the top toolbar for the brush properties. If you want to bring back the color completely, leave the brush opacity at 100 percent. Lower the opacity if you want only part of the color to come back.
  • If you make a mistake, just switch your color to White and paint over the area again.
  • When working with Masks, don't think of the Black and White as color but as "On and Off". White is ON. Black is OFF.
  • Switch back and forth between black and white until your image is as you'd like. Use a hard brush when you want a very precise edge.
    Masks are wonderful because they add very little to your file size and they leave your original in tact. Almost every adjustment in Photoshop can be done with an Adjustment layer. You can then use the attached Mask to undo portions of your adjustment that might have been too strong in some areas.
    Have fun!


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    10/20/2004 5:41:34 PM

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    Oscar J. Martinez
    BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/3/2003
     

    Thank you, Marianne. This is why I like BetterPhoto.com, you always learn something new. Let me tell you that the little I know of Photoshop, I have learned it by myself. I never received a lesson until now, from you. Thanks. By the way, what do you think about my picture above?


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    10/21/2004 5:47:55 AM

     
    Marianne Jensen
    BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/9/2003
     

    Oscar,
    I think your composition is very creative!


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    10/21/2004 7:17:49 AM

     
    Amalia Sylvia Ms Arriaga Salinas
    BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/1/2001
    Contact Amalia Sylvia
    Amalia Sylvia's Gallery
     

    Oscar , esta es una excellente fotografia, muy original y con una perspectiva muy diferente. Felicidades!,
    Amalia


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    11/18/2004 7:23:11 AM

     
    Ron Burgis  

     
    Another option is to leave a little color on the rest of the picture. It's a little complicated but well worth it. It's a combination between your method and Marianne's.

    Open the image, make a copy, go to "Image - Adjustment - Desaturate"(make it B&W)add a layer mask (square with hole in it below layers palet).

    Select the paint brush as described above and paint with black to bring back the color to what you want.

    To leave some of the color in the background do the following.

    Make another copy of the background,
    move it to the top. Make an adjustment layer (the half moon thing at the bottom of the palet) of Hue/Saturation. Slide the saturation slider to the left to remove some or most of the color. Then paint on the "layer mask" as you did befor to bring back the full color as before.

    This method lets go back to add more or less color or B&W to your picture.

    Ron B


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    11/18/2004 9:06:22 AM

     
    Oscar J. Martinez
    BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/3/2003
     

    Amalia:
    Qu gusto y qu honor recibir un comentario de la mejor fotografa de Monterrey y sus alrededores. Muchas gracias. Sigo aprendiendo un poquito ms cada da gracias a Betterphoto.
    Durante la semana del 22 al 26 de nov voy a estar en tu ciudad tomando fotografas. Despus te mando algunas para que las critiques. Saludos y de nuevo gracias.


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    11/19/2004 6:04:28 AM

     
    Oscar J. Martinez
    BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/3/2003
     

    Thank you Ron. I will practice your advise. The bad news is that I am not an expert with this tool. By the way, do you know how can I change the background of a picture? for example, if I have a picture of my daughter in my backyard, how can I change the backyard for a beach, for example? I would appreciate your comments.


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    11/19/2004 6:10:38 AM

     
    Ron Burgis  

     
    Oscar.....that is the key (and hard part) of photoshop....making selections.

    Using your bride as an example, we can move her to a studio backdrop or beach or anything else you have a picture of.

    First...make a copy of the background
    Next...you have to make a selection of only the bride. You can try "Filter-Extract" (works pretty good on some pictures, but not on others) or the "Lasso" tool.

    The extraction tool will remove all the pixels but the bride, after the extraction you will probably have to "clean up" the extraction (adding pixels that were remover and removing pixels that weren't.

    The lasso tool selects the bride. You have to go to "select-inverse", the delete. With luck you will have a layer with only your bride. The hard part is making a clean selection of the bride, including all her dress, hair and nove of the background. The bad needs is the only way to get better is to practice & practice. The eraser and history brush will become your best friends!

    After you're happy with your bride, open the picture you want her to go into. Click and drag the layer with the bride into the new picture. You might have to use the free transform to adjust her size to fit the new picture. With luck it will look pretty good.

    Once you perfect that part of it, it will be time to learn more ways to fine tune you selections.

    If you don't get a concussion beating you head against the wall before you get good, it will open up a whole other world!

    Ron B.


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    11/19/2004 7:32:00 AM

     
    Ron Burgis  

     
    BetterPhoto.com Editor's Pick   Shaylee's Montage
    Shaylee's Montage
    f2.8m 1/160 sec.,flash fill. Nikin 80-200 Lens at 200mm
    © Ron Burgis
    Nikon D100 Digital...
     
    Oscar.....that is the key (and hard part) of photoshop....making selections.

    Using your bride as an example, we can move her to a studio backdrop or beach or anything else you have a picture of.

    First...make a copy of the background
    Next...you have to make a selection of only the bride. You can try "Filter-Extract" (works pretty good on some pictures, but not on others) or the "Lasso" tool.

    The extraction tool will remove all the pixels but the bride, after the extraction you will probably have to "clean up" the extraction (adding pixels that were remover and removing pixels that weren't.

    The lasso tool selects the bride. You have to go to "select-inverse", the delete. With luck you will have a layer with only your bride. The hard part is making a clean selection of the bride, including all her dress, hair and nove of the background. The bad needs is the only way to get better is to practice & practice. The eraser and history brush will become your best friends!

    After you're happy with your bride, open the picture you want her to go into. Click and drag the layer with the bride into the new picture. You might have to use the free transform to adjust her size to fit the new picture. With luck it will look pretty good.

    Once you perfect that part of it, it will be time to learn more ways to fine tune you selections.

    If you don't get a concussion beating you head against the wall before you get good, it will open up a whole other world!

    Ron B.


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    11/19/2004 7:42:22 AM

     
    Marianne Jensen
    BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/9/2003
     

    Hi Oscar,

    Here's another method that you might like. It's great for beginners because it's very easy and fun.

    1. Open the new background image and the image of your daughter.

    2. Make the new background the same size and resolution as your daughters image. This is important.

    3. Select the "move" tool. Hold the "shift" key and then drag your daughter's image on top of the new background. Holding the shift key while dragging will line the images up perfectly. You will now have two layers. Your daughter should be on top.

    4. Use the Lasso tool to draw a quick selection around your daughter. It doesn't have to be exact because you will fix that later.

    5.With the selection active, click on the Layer Mask icon at the bottom of the Layers Palette. It is the second icon from the left and looks like a square donut.

    6. Now the time consuming part! You are going to use the mask to fine tune the selection. Use Black to bring more of the background through. If you make a mistake, then use White to correct it. Keep going back and forth between black and white until it is perfect.

    TIPS: A. Make SURE you are working on the mask. You will see the mask icon beside the "eye" of the layer. B. Use a soft brush to begin with and then a hard brush for a precise edge. C. When you are totally done, you can also apply a slight gaussian blur to the mask to make the transition look even better.

    Have fun!


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    11/19/2004 8:41:52 AM

     
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