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Lake Quinalt
  Lake Quinault
Lake Quinault
Using a polarizer to intensify the blue sky, I shot this with the intention of conveying a restful, relaxing day by the lake.
© Jim Miotke
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
 
 
 
Chad J. Perry

member since: 12/10/2002
    Color saturation is amazing! Are you using a polorizing filter?

12/10/2002 2:28:04 PM

 
Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
 

Thanks, Chad. Yes, this has been fully polarized to get that deep blue sky and saturated reds and greens.

Although I have learned over the years that a little polarizing goes a long way, I still can't live without this filter.

Thanks again for your comments.

 
Melissa Williams

member since: 3/29/2003
 

So a circular polarizer will enhance my blue skies? I didn't know that =) I was only using it to combat reflections on glass and water, etc. I'll be using it a lot more now!

 
Kelly Heaton
BetterPhoto Member
kellyheaton.com

member since: 3/19/2004
 

Nice Color...yes I get that feeling...I would like to be sitting there with a tall glass of ice tea , taking in some sun rays.....

3/31/2004 11:01:03 AM

 
Rick Richardson 

member since: 8/6/2001
 

Hey Jim, question for you: in this shot, are you using a polarizer with a digital camera or film? Do you think it is still a good idea to use this filter even though we can achieve this effect in PS? Thanks!!

9/19/2004 10:42:28 PM

 
Jim Miotke
BetterPhoto Member
BetterPhotoJim.com
Owner, BetterPhoto.com, Inc.
 

Thanks for your questions and comments.

Yes, Eric, I still do use the traditional polarizer often, even when shooting digitally. This image was created with a film camera, many years ago.

I don't use other filters, because I know I can duplicate the effect in Photoshop and, thus, shooting without a filter, I have more options than if I were to shoot one photo with a filter.

However, there is a trade-off. In order to create the effect in Photoshop, one needs to know the program and have the time to do the software work. So I still recommend shooting with a polarizer out in the field. I find the polarizer to be so helpful that I often shoot one photo with and one photo without it.

Thanks again for your comments. As the rainy days are coming on full force, I too could really use a day by the lake - soaking in the sunshine :^)

9/20/2004 9:31:03 AM

 
Riia Luhtanen
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 2/25/2005
 

Hi Jim, loking at your gallery, great photos. In this one, even though I see the composition (I'm learning that stuff, looking at lots of comments and critiques :) ), the white spots on the tree on the left distract my eyes from the purpose, or the point, of the picture, which I think is for the chairs to take you to the further-away object. The depth is excellent, as are in probably all of your pix where depth is wanted.

Take care, Riia

3/6/2005 12:10:51 PM

 
Rick Richardson 

member since: 8/6/2001
 

Riaa, I'm looking at Jim's shot with my 21" screen and don't see the white spots you refer to. Something that helped my perspective quite a bit was reading some of the late Galen Rowell's thoughts on why one does not always have to 'remove something undesirable' from every photo (ie: photoshop). Indeed, It can be satisfying to leave a photo, excepting on-lens filters, 'as shot'. Eric.

3/6/2005 6:52:36 PM

 
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