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Covered Wagon

  The Drinkard's Covered Wagon
The Drinkard's Covered Wagon
Our local power company puts out a monthly news magazine with their updates and local stories of interest. They ran an article about the Brownsville Museum (Linn County Museum, Oregon) I found very interesting. After reading the article I had to go and have a look. They have a covered wagon that is kinda special. According to June Schlosser, a volunteer at the Museum, it's the only authentic Oregon Trail covered wagon in a public collection. There are three other known authentic Oregon Trail wagons left in existence but they are in private collections.

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© Denny E. Barnes
Nikon D300 Digital...

 
  William and Martha Drinkard's Covered Wagon
William and Martha Drinkard's Covered Wagon
© Denny E. Barnes
Nikon D300 Digital...
 
 
 
Denny E. Barnes
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/19/2008
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    The wagon's story begins in Grundy County, Missouri. William and Martha Drinkard pioneered to Oregon because of the Civil War. When the war broke out in 1861, William enlisted in the Confederate Army and after several battles was captured by the Union forces. William was held at a prison camp in Illinois. In early 1865, Martha traveled from Missouri to Illinois to beg for his release. His release was on one condition, he never return to Missouri until after the war ended.

To honor the oath, William and Martha made plans to wagon train to Oregon. Since William couldn't set foot in Missouri, Martha alone sold their farm, bought a good wagon and chose her best horses for the trip. Martha and her four children traveled from Missouri to Iowa, picked up William and they were off to Oregon in the spring of 1865. The journey took six months. The Drinkards arrived in Linn County in September 1865 and spend some time in Brownsville before settling in Harrisburg, Oregon. The covered wagon spent many years in a machine shed. In the 1950s, the Drinkard's descendants built a new machine shed and donated the wagon to the Brownsville Museum.


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5/26/2011 7:55:35 AM

 
Denny E. Barnes
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/19/2008
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The Linn County Historical Museum is in the original Brownsville train depot. It is quite a place. It's not very big and they have used every square inch of it. Some of their displays are rather hard to photograph because you are too close and need a very wide angle lens. Besides the covered wagon there are a buckboard, general store, dress shop, dentist office, doctor's office, Indian artifacts, theater and hundreds of other historical items all from the late 1800s to early 1900s.
I'll post more images from the museum in the next few days...


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5/26/2011 8:09:39 AM

 
Bobby Ray Goodman
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/23/2006
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Hi Denny,WOW!!!Great info my friend.It almost look like a old Conestoga wagon.I think I would really enioy that museum.Aewsome capture and great detail!!!!


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5/26/2011 10:16:14 AM

 
Mike Clime
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2007
 

Wow, how cool is that to see one that was actually on the trail! My power company doesn't do anything like that, Denny!


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5/26/2011 12:36:21 PM

 
Tammy M. Anderson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/13/2007
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countryimpressions.net
 

Interesting info and great capture, Denny. Fabulous tones and details.


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5/26/2011 1:11:06 PM

 
Jeff W. Robinson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/17/2002
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Excellent capture and info Denny!


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5/26/2011 2:21:18 PM

 
Ron McEwan
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/3/2008
 

Love these things. I was the president of our museum here for a few years. Great information. I have followed the eastern part of the trail up through WY. Like to finish it some day.


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5/26/2011 2:49:57 PM

 
Ellen Hodges
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/19/2005
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Super interesting capture and info, Denny!!


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5/26/2011 6:35:16 PM

 
Robert K. Bemus
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/16/2005
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Wow, great shot and fascinating history, Denny!! Amazing stamina and grit those people had to make the westward trek...


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5/26/2011 7:25:41 PM

 
Denny E. Barnes
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/19/2008
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Thank you ever so much Bobby, Mike, Tammy, Jeff, Ron, Ellen and Robert!


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5/27/2011 11:28:27 AM

 
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