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Photography Question 
Mike  Johansen
 

Black and White from Color Film?


First of all, thanks to everyone who contributes to the many questions. My question: I have been asked to provide some outdoor black and white shots for interior design, approximately 20 x 30 size, using medium format (6x4.5 or 6x7). I've always shot color, and my lab says to continue and they will process in B/W. I will practice this weekend, but have never looked at any subject and "imagined" B/W. Any suggestions/tips, etc.?


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4/30/2004 1:17:34 PM

 
Jordan    In general, for shooting B/W, I've always looked for things like shape and texture to make the images interesting - or even certain kinds of lighting. Don't look for vivid color to make the image appealing to look at.


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5/3/2004 1:20:24 PM

 
Robert Bridges   many many years ago ( I refuse to say how many) when I was into B&W in a big
way I bought some gel filters from Kodak (which they probably still make) and
fitted them over a pair of glasses. Essentially, these filters changed the world into
brown and white. You might get some and play.


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5/4/2004 9:41:24 PM

 
Dan    If you use digital, color can be convered using software to convert it to BW... Photoshop

tool bar>
Image>
Adjustments>
Desaturate


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5/5/2004 8:56:11 AM

 
russ bronson   We played in the darkroom last year with some 35mm color film of 9/11, and printed in black and white. What we got was a very interesting soft finish, and the larger we printed, of course the softer we got. It was a stunning effect, but if your client is after sharpness in these huge prints, I don't think that even the large format negative is going to help you. For that size of print, I would staying with black and white film, but only speaking from my one experience.


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5/6/2004 4:06:21 PM

 
James C. Ritchie
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/17/2004
 
 
 
You can convert color images to BW, but be careful how you do it.


Dan said...
-------------
If you use digital, color can be convered using software to convert it to BW... Photoshop

tool bar>
Image>
Adjustments>
Desaturate
-------------


I've found the best thing to do is 'convert to grayscale' instead of using 'desaturate'. The "SHELL" sign in the photos below is yellow with red letters. The 2nd image has been 'converted' to grayscale; the 3rd image was desaturated. Notice that the letters are plainly visible in the 2nd image, but they nearly disappear in the 3rd image. (Also notice the subtle loss of contrast.)

[Note - This was done in Corel PhotoPaint. I assume Photoshop would produce similar results.]


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5/28/2004 5:55:33 PM

 
James C. Ritchie
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/17/2004
 
 
 


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5/28/2004 6:06:13 PM

 
James C. Ritchie
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/17/2004
 
 
  <B>Color</B>
Color
© James C. Ritchie
Nikon F-801 (N8008...
 
  <B>Color converted to greyscale.</B>
Color converted to greyscale.
© James C. Ritchie
Nikon F-801 (N8008...
 
  <B>Color desaturated</B>
Color desaturated

Desaturation caused the red letters on the yellow "SHELL" sign to nearly disappear. There is also a slight loss of contrast.

© James C. Ritchie
Nikon F-801 (N8008...
 
 
Converting to grayscale vs. desaturation.


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5/28/2004 6:42:06 PM

 
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