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Photography Question 
Linda McLellan
 

Photographing Reflections in Water Drops


Can anyone tell me how to shoot water drops to capture the image reflected in the water? Thanks!


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4/4/2004 6:12:06 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  You need a lens that can get close enough to the water drop so you can see the image. After that, it's just a matter of positioning the object behind the water drop, and positioning your camera so that the image appears clearly. And you focus on the water drop, not whatever's behind it. Because of the cohesive nature of water, a single drop has a curved surface, so it acts just like a glass lens. And if you have to add light to the subject, put the lights between the subject and the water drop, not between you and the water drop. It's really something anybody can do - you just need to be able to get a close enough image of the water drop for whatever's behind it to be visible.


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4/4/2004 2:17:23 PM

 
Greg McCroskery
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/27/2003
imagismphotos.com
  Linda,
This takes a little set up time and practice, but using a sheet of glass between your camera and the subject works well. First, apply a product called 'Rain-X' to the glass -- you can find it at your local auto parts store. 'Rain-X' is used on windshields to make water bead up, rather than spread -- in your photo application it will create distinct water beads on the glass pane. When you place your subject (flower, bug, whatever) beneath the glass (you will need to experiment with the distance) you will see little magnified images of your subject in the drops. Light your subject from below, and to the side of the glass and focus on the water drops. Here's a link to a rose image I did using this technique:
http://www.pbase.com/image/6975321.jpg
I look forward to seeing your results!
God Bless,
Greg


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4/5/2004 7:01:02 AM

 
Alisha May Furbish
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/5/2003
  I am so glad someone asked this question- I have been wondering how this is done. I tried this, and I don't know what I did wrong, but I couldn't get a reflection. At the risk of becoming irritating, let me add a few more questions:
How exactly is this set up? I did it flat, so the water wouldn't roll.
Do you use an eyedropper to apply the water?
I tried to visit the link above, and I was told " this page cannot be displayed", blah blah blah- I was so dissapointed- but I will keep trying. Thanks:)))))


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4/6/2004 8:16:05 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Well it's not really a reflection, it's light off the object passing through the water drop to you. Maybe you knew that, but you may have been doing something differently because you thought it was by reflection, so if you already knew that, didn't mean to be redundant.
Use anything to apply a water drop, you can even do it with rain in the little squares of a screen window. Lately you've probably seen the flower in the water so I'll use that example first.
You have your flower somewhere like on the floor. You have a piece of glass, like from a picture frame, find some way to hold/clamp it to something above the flower. Put your drop of water on the glass.
Then by adjusting the height of the glass from the flower, and by adjusting the height of your camera from the glass, you'll get the image of the flower in the water drop. Just like a regular maginfying glass. But you need a lens that lets you get a decent image of the water drop.
Put a drop of water on the clear part of a cd case and look through it at a key on your comp keyboard, you'll see it.
If you can't get one drop in a good sized image, put several drops on the glass. And if you have rain drops on your window, you can do it with outside stuff. Just back up or get closer to the window till you get a good image.


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4/6/2004 9:43:34 PM

 
Alisha May Furbish
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/5/2003
  Okay- that's exactly how I did it- on the floor, so I'm off to a good start! My digital macro mode isn't the best, but I have a +5 diopter for my Canon 35-80- think that will do the trick? I will attempt it again- thanks for the further explanation- I really appreciate it and will continue to try to see the link you posted!


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4/6/2004 9:56:00 PM

 
Greg McCroskery
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/27/2003
imagismphotos.com
  Alisha,
This is probably getting confusing -- you have two Gregory's responding!
I'm the one who posted the link -- try this: http://www.pbase.com/image/6975321
One suggestion I might make is to use a cardboard box with one side cut out of it. Drape a piece of black fabric inside the box so that it covers the bottom and sides of the box and place the sheet of glass over the top of the box. Place your subject (flower, or whatever) inside the box, beneath the glass and use the open side of the box to light your subject. If you apply 'Rain-X' to the glass you can spray or sprinkle water on the top of the glass and it will bead up nicely. Hope this suggestion helps.
God Bless,
Greg


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4/7/2004 6:52:57 AM

 
Alisha May Furbish
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/5/2003
  Great idea- thanks to both the Gregs! The box sounds perfect, I had the glass suspended between 2 chairs and the flower on a box and shadows everywhere- a disaster! Thanks again!


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4/7/2004 8:36:46 AM

 
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