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Photography Question 
Carol Shagovac
 

taking pictures of red tail hawks


i am looking to take pictures of hawks. i've tried camcorders sony trv250 with picture taking options of 20x optical which on tape are fine but to print a picture is not so easy first you cant take a picture will recording because it comes out blurry. and you cant use a tri pod because they fly away to quick. sometimes if I had the right item to use I can get like maybe 40 feet close sum times im lucky enough to get closer. I also tried digital binoculars with built in camera which is lousy for pictures but good for seeing. I tried a point and shoot 170mm which was ok but still not a great close picture. I just got a slr 35mm they said would be better then a point and shoot regualar 170mm I still cant get a great close up. I know you've helped me a lot so far with answers. but what else can I try as in equipment wise without spending alot more money? less then 500.00? and also where can I find hawk shoots for taking pictures but also I would like to know what I can use outside in the wild for a hawk at least 30 feet away and still get a nice close up? I am sorry for bothing you again. thank you so much already for your help.


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3/1/2004 4:12:21 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  For actual wild hawks, you'll have to find a nest, or a place where they like to hang around a lot, place where they like to hunt, and set up a blind close enough to get a picture and wait. And I mean wait several hours. You can try setting a lure, like a fake field mouse, and try to get one to get close. But actual wild hawks are hard to get close to.
Any picture of one that you may have seen here was taken at a nature reserve, rehab facility, where you are allowed to take pictures of birds that are tame, used to being around people. So you can get a few feet away and take a picture.
Or you might possibly be able to get semi close to one if you see one perched on a street light and you are in your car. As long as you stay in your car, you can get kinda close. But you'll need to be careful and quick when you roll down your window and point your camera at it. Because that's when it will likely fly away. Birds will stay put sometimes, but as soon as you look at them, they'll take off.


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3/1/2004 4:34:51 PM

 
Carol Shagovac   THANK YOU VERY MUCH CAN YOU THINK OF ANYTHING ELSE I CAN USE LIKE A DIFFERENT LENSE ON MY SLR THAT GOES FURTHER DISTANCE? AND WHAT IS THE FURTHIEST PLACE YOU CAN TAKE A GOOD PICTURE OF A HAWK AND WHAT EQUIPMENT WOULD BE BEST FOR THIS A CAMCORDER OR A CAMERA?


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3/1/2004 5:13:16 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Not for $500. Any lens that you could use to get a close shot of a wild hawk without using a blind would be a few thousand. Even if you used a 200mm with a 2x converter, you're going over $500.
The furthest distance for a good photo is subjective, because it depends on if somebody wants to fill the frame, or they want a picture that you can tell it's a hawk.
Where I live you see them perch on streetlights along the highway, on electrical wires, sometimes you see them come down to catch something along the medium. You'll have to make several attempts until you get what you like.
A camera would be the best if you want a photograph, to me.


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3/1/2004 8:58:30 PM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  You should be able to find a decent 500mm f/8 mirror lens (also called "reflex") for your SLR for much less than $500. It'll be fairly sharp and relatively lightweight, but the drawbacks are:

(a) it'll be manual focus only, unless you have Minolta Maxxum and can use Minolta's autofocus AF 500 f/8 reflex (more expensive the typical 500 f/8 mirror lens at ~$560).

(b)its aperture will be fixed at f/8 so you need fast film to get a high shutter speed. Most SLRs will work in aperture priority autoexposure mode to set proper shutter speed.

and
(c) the out of focus highlights will appear as doughnuts.


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3/2/2004 8:33:54 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  I see sigma still makes one to fit an EOS for $400. A 600mm. The fixed f/8 is a drawback. But I always liked how the doughnut background highlights looked.
But the thing about being fairly sharp, I am apreihensive about. I have seen stuff from a mirror lens made by Samyang, but Sigma has a better reputation then they do. But that is an option to consider.
Sigma also makes one to fit a nikon and minolta. Didn't realize they were still being made. But it might work.


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3/2/2004 12:19:07 PM

 
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