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Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Rachel E. Youngs
 

Starting Out in Photography


Hi, I'm very interested in photography and just got my first camera. I'd like to start my way to becoming a pro - could someone tell me where do I start?
I want to mainly photograph horses but I don't want to stick to just one area.
If someone could help that would be great.

Thanks


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1/2/2004 4:38:28 AM

 
Kerry Drager
BetterPhoto Member
Kerry's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: Creative Close-ups
  Hi Rachel: First of all, congrats on getting your first camera! As for where to start, you've certainly come to the perfect place - BetterPhoto! Ideally, your photographic development should involve the following:

- Get out and shoot WHENEVER you can. Along the way, try to slow down and really think about your subject and about the best way to photograph it (i.e., horizontal or vertical format, moving in closer or to the side, zooming in or zooming out, etc.). This process is the first step in proceeding beyond the snapshot stage!

- Read absolutely EVERYTHING you can about photography - from BetterPhoto's how-to articles/discussions to print magazines to how-to books.

- Look at photographs at EVERY opportunity. This includes magazines and books, of course, but also the wonderful photography displayed right here at BetterPhoto ... including the winners and finalists of current and past contests, AND the work of individual photographers at their Member Galleries or Deluxe Web Sites.

- When you see a photo you like, try to figure out what you like it - i.e., the light, the composition, the angle of view, etc. If you're not sure how a particular technique was used in a BP discussion or contest photo, then be sure and ask the photographer!

- An important tip about looking at great photography: Do NOT get discouraged ... after all, absolutely every experienced photographer started out as a beginner, too!

- Also, be sure to check out BP's excellent lineup of online courses - and consider signing up for a class ... if not for the Winter session, then perhaps the Spring session. Online education can be a relatively easy - and enjoyable - way to quickly boost your skills!

- As your own photography develops, you'll want to start paying attention to how and where photos are sold - i.e., cards or prints at a local gallery or shop; magazines, calendars and other print publications; online outlets; portrait or studio work; stock photo agencies, etc.

Hope this helps, Rachel ... good luck!


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1/3/2004 1:16:39 PM

 
Rachel E. Youngs   Hi Kerry,

Thanks so much for you info its really opened my eyes. I'm getting out and now looking at everything as a photo.
I can't believe how much is out there that would make good photos. I see everyday things in a different way.
The info on BP is great to.
Thanks so much for your help Kerry.
Hope you'll see my photos around.


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1/6/2004 4:15:29 AM

 
Kerry Drager
BetterPhoto Member
Kerry's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: Creative Close-ups
  Hi Rachel: Thanks for the follow-up ... I'm so glad I could be of help!! All the best in your photographic pursuits!!


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1/6/2004 8:08:28 AM

 
Carey Yazeed   Hi Rachel:

Your local library is a good place to start with reading materials and some areas have photography clubs where members get together once a month to discuss photography.


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1/6/2004 2:55:27 PM

 
Rachel E. Youngs   Hi Carey

Thanks I'll look into a photography club. Sound like they would be good.

Thanks


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1/7/2004 8:34:16 PM

 
Phil Ramey   Hi Rachel:
There are several "basics" that was recommend to me by some great crime scene photographers with the state police. Check your libray fist but a few of the books I read where Professional Secrets of Natural Light Portrait Photography by Allen Box, Zone System byBrian Lav. Send me an email if you want somemore reference matterials and digial "how to" things. What kind of camera did you get again?

Hope this helps, Phil


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1/16/2004 9:05:32 AM

 
Phil Ramey   Hi Rachel:
There are several "basics" that was recommend to me by some great crime scene photographers with the state police. Check your libray fist but a few of the books I read where Professional Secrets of Natural Light Portrait Photography by Allen Box, Zone System byBrian Lav. Send me an email at peramey2@juno.com if you want somemore reference matterials and digial "how to" things. What kind of camera did you get again?

Hope this helps, Phil


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1/16/2004 9:06:39 AM

 
Rachel E. Youngs   Hi phil

thanks for the reference. I'll be heading to the libray straight away.

I got a 35mm.

Just finished my first film and can't wait to see what they look like.

Thanks For the help. Is it ok if I keep your e-mail on hand?

Rachel


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1/16/2004 10:25:40 PM

 
Matthew D. Koller   Definately take kerry's advice, as well as every body elses at this site. Everyone has their favorite aspect of photography, and it sounds like horses are a passion for you.

Like Kerry stated "realy think about your subject."

Pre-Visualization is Key to taking Photographs not snapshots.

Try to visualize what your final print will look like and what you are trying to express.

Read. Read. Read. And have lots of patients. Take photos as often as you can, but do not get disappointed when all of them don't turn out. It does not happen. especially when starting out. Be happy with the photos that make you happy.

A hard lesson That took me a while to swallow was the fact that not every one will like my photos. Big deal, If I like them they ispire me to take more. That is what leads to a craving for knowledge and experience.

Good Luck and Good Choice

-Matt www.mdkphoto.com


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1/17/2004 1:38:36 AM

 
Rachel E. Youngs   Hi Matt,

Thanks for the advice. I was a little worried about what people think about my photos but hey if I like them. The way I now look at it the more photos I take the better I should get.
Horses are my passion and the good thing I can use my own horse as my main subject which is great.
thanks For the advice
I'm doing a lot of reading now.. :)
When the photos are done i'll show you guys some and you can tell me what you think. :)
Cya later
Rach


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1/17/2004 3:25:40 AM

 
Phil Ramey   Rachel:
Oh, 35mm film. Most everyone is getting away from that format and going over to digital capture. But its really about getting your composition down at this point so 35mm should be fine for a while. If you want to start editing your photos by cropping or color balance on the computer, you can always ask the lab to print your photos and burn them onto a CD for you. You can get Adobe photoshop elements and edit the photos on your computer. I would make the transition to digital as soon as you can. You can take the shot, and review it right on the spot, and learn from your mistakes much faster then waiting to get the film back and trying to remember your f-stop ect. Also, you do not need to use filters for outdoor or indoor shots with digial for color balance! I like the Canon rebel digital for price but I like the Nikon lenses for quality. If you already have a lense for what ever type of camera you have, go with that digial body. Get a canon, or get a Fuji S-2 for nikon lenses. So its up to you and I would recomment going to helix camera and video.com to get some good comparisons. Most digial cameras of pro quality come with adobe photoshp, fyi. The Natural Light Portrait book should be great for your horses! Same concept just replace the people subject with horses. He goes over the angle of light techniques so you dont get that burn hot spot on the top of the subject ect. Really great for shooting outdoors

Hope that helps, Phil


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1/21/2004 8:54:22 AM

 
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