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Lydia Ivy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/14/2003
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Shooting TIFor JPEG


If I shoot in JPEG, then take my images right out of my camera & save them as TIFs, will the quality be the same as shooting in TIF? Thanks


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8/26/2003 10:32:10 AM

 
Wayne Attridge   If you shoot in JPEG format with your camera in order to get more pix on the memory card, the camera compresses the image. A JPEG image has much information discarded in order to make the file size smaller. This information cannot be retrieved afterwards by any current means. There is actually no purpose to saving these JPEGs as TIF files. If you want TIF files with all the data for the picture, you must shoot them as TIF and save them as TIF. You should burn a CD with the TIF files on it for archiving and then convert to JPEG for emailing, etc. So, the answer to your question in a word: NO.


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8/26/2003 8:55:37 PM

 
Lydia Ivy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/14/2003
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  Wayne, thank you for your response. I am no longer confused and will be shooting in TIF. The number of images I can shoot goes down dramatically. Do I just get a larger memory card/s?


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8/26/2003 9:16:11 PM

 
Wayne Attridge   You can buy a larger capacity memory card or more cards, whichever suits you. The larger cards are more economical than the smaller ones. Buy only what you need right now as the price is constantly dropping.


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8/26/2003 11:21:46 PM

 
Lydia Ivy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/14/2003
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  Hi Wayne, thanks again. Good to know.


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8/27/2003 2:45:30 AM

 
doug Nelson
DougNelsonPhoto.com
  It's true that there's no need to convert your JPEG's to TIFs out of the camera, except in this instance. If you plan to do edits in a lot of steps with SAVES, each save recompresses the image. You can protect it from overcompression by working it as a TIF. Having said that, some images will tolerate a few edits and saves. Some, however, won't.


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8/27/2003 7:26:00 AM

 
Jeff S. Kennedy   The difference in quality between TIF (RAW) and high quality jpeg is probably not even noticeable. The main advantage to shooting in TIF is the ability to tweak the image and adjust easily for exposure and white balance etc. later. I shoot weddings and portraiture. For weddings I only shoot the formals in RAW. The rest gets shot in jpeg. For portraits I shoot in RAW so that I can fine tune it later. It's not necessary to shoot in TIF all the time.


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9/1/2003 9:17:43 PM

 
Lydia Ivy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/14/2003
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  WAYNE, DOUG & JEFF, thank you for responding to my question, I have found your knowledge very helpful. I went right out and bought a 1GB CF. shooting in Super fine mode yields me approx. 69 images. Should I shoot some images in jpeg to get more pics. If yes, what kinds?

I have a Minolta 5.2 mega pixel Dimage 7. According to the manual RAW & Super fine on my camera are both TIF. The other settings,Fine, standard & economy are jpeg files. So what would the difference be between RAW & Super fine?
Thanks again...and again.


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9/2/2003 11:07:28 AM

 
Wayne Attridge   I don't know what the exact difference would be between RAW and superfine modes if they are both TIF. Your manual should give you a reasonable description. As far as shooting jpeg, these can be used in various qualities depending on their intended use. High for pix you want to enlarge and crop, or print and save as is. Medium for 4x6 printed snapshots. Low for pix you want to email to friends and family. The ones you want to shoot as TIF files are those that you want to manipulate, for example, in Photoshop where you may make changes to contrast, colour balance, or textures like canvas, and things of this nature. If you save these as TIF or PSD (photoshop files)after you have worked with them, you can do this over and over again without losing the picture quality. That is not possible with jpeg. You did not mention whether or not you even use Photoshop or the like, so you may find that jpeg is just what you want. Hope this helps.


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9/2/2003 2:32:20 PM

 
Lydia Ivy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/14/2003
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  Hi Wayne, thank you for your help. And yes, I have Photoshop. I consulted my manual and it appears the Raw image data is unprocessed and requires image processing before it can be used. To view the RAW data, I have to use my Dimage utility software, which reconstructs the image. For now as a beginner I think I will continue using TIF files since I am undecided beforehand as to which photos I may want to keep. Thank you once again.


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9/2/2003 7:14:24 PM

 
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