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Photography Question 
April M. Foran
 

How to improve wedding photos


Hello, I recently got married and my cousin shot my wedding. My photos are regular 4x6 prints developed from 35mm negatives. I wanted to know what the best way is to crop them and make them look professional. Should I buy software or is there a company that I could send them too? I also heard you can spray them to help preserve and if so where can I buy this?


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1/12/2003 9:37:23 PM

 
Andy 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/28/2002
  Can you tell us a little bit more about what resources you already have (PC with photo editing software, scanner, printer, etc.)? Of course if you can find a custom lab, you can bring the photos and the negatives in and tell them how you want the final photos to look like. Or you can send out your negatives to have them drum-scanned and do the editing yourself. Then print out the final image if you have a photo quality printer or send them out again to have them printed. The quality also depending on the quality of the negatives. Are they professional film? A find grain or high speed film? Do you want to enlarge them? You don't need to spray your photos if you frame your photos with non acidic material and do not put it under direct sun. BTW, congratulations.


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1/13/2003 8:48:27 AM

 
April M. Foran   Thanks Andy! At the moment I only have a PC but was looking to buy photo editing software, scanner, and a printer in the next 6 months. I wasn't sure if I could realistacally make reprints that have been edited and print them without buying really expensive equipment. I also wanted to enlarge only some of them for framing. Unfortunetly, I don't know anything about what film and speed she used. I will have to ask her. The only thing I know is she sent them off to be developed rather than have them developed by a local store. My photos will be in an album so should I spray them? Thanks for your help!


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1/13/2003 9:15:52 AM

 
Andy 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/28/2002
  I would not worry about the software that much because when you buy your scanner, there will be one that comes with it (most of the case). Usually the PhotoShop 5.0 LE version. I found it is good enough for me because I do not do heavy manipulation. A very good photo quality printer nowadays mostly cost under $200 if you do not plan to print larger than 8.5x11. It's the ink, not the printer and paper, that bites you. Depending on the resolution you scan your photos and how much you crop it, the quality may vary. If you do have a scanner, always scan your images at the HIGHEST resolution and SAVE the original image before croping or editing.


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1/14/2003 12:31:36 PM

 
Wayne Attridge   When you purchase a printer, take a serious look at the Epson. The ink is not dye based (like food colouring) but pigment based which means it contains finely ground colour powders that retain their colour much better over time. The dye based inks fade in direct light. So, be sure to research this before you buy a machine. Some retailers don't know and may lead you astray. Ask a reputable dealer. As well, I use a Canon flatbed scanner and am very happy with the results. I believe they are the only consumer brand sold by a camera company. They are reasonably priced also. Hope this is of some help to you.


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1/14/2003 7:06:41 PM

 
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