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Photography Question 
Kathryn Wesserling
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
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Today's POTD (9/12/13)


I'd like some learning time on today's POTD. It was a Finalist in the Catch-All category for July, and I loved it, but was so confused. To me, it looks as though it would have to be a Digital Darkroom piece to achieve those wonderful effects. The settings that were used are available with the image.

Would some of you more knowledgeable photographers look at it, and tell me how it was done? It's so fascinating, but I cannot figure it out (and it's driving me nuts!) Thanks.

http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?photoID=14013063&catID=58181&contestCatID=10&rowNumber=3&camID=


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9/12/2013 6:46:21 AM

 
Nikki McDonald
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/6/2006
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  Like you, Kathy, I think it's beautiful and the joyous energy is incredibly contagious. I don't think it's highly processed - late day light coming through the water spray and a fast enough shutter speed to freeze the action and spray would be enough. He might have enhanced the color, too. Look at the nearest figures - they look absolutely "normal".

And there's no restriction on processing in any category at BP that I know of - hasn't been for years. My biggest problem is often that I cannot create an image that has enough over-the-top "darkroom" work on it to qualify for the DD category LOL


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9/12/2013 7:19:24 AM

 
Kathryn Wesserling
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
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  Here are the settings...
f/11, 1/640 second, ISO: 200, Focal Length: 185mm

Someone else suggested it was back lighting which made a lot of sense. I just couldn't figure it out by myself. I think it was the normalcy of the nearest figures that threw me off - almost like selective coloring.

There are so many photographers (Jessica Jenney is one of them) who uses textures to change camera images into near paintings. Anything like that, I consider DD and have entered a few of my pieces into that category. Maybe, that's why they never get picked - they aren't DD enough.

Thanks for your input, Nikki - it's helped me.


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9/12/2013 8:26:42 AM

 
Richard Lynch
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/12/2005
  It looks to me like there is the possibility that highlights were shifted towards red. That is not at all hard to do with Photoshop and color balance, though it is quite possible that the color was either natural (because of lighting conditions) or simply enhanced (saturation). A variety of simple enhancement techniques can be used to achieve this type of result -- it really depends on what the original image looked like.


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9/14/2013 11:22:37 AM

 
Kathryn Wesserling
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
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  I think it was confusing because the two foremost figures have different colors and tones than all the rest. I just couldn't figure out how the tonality was achieved.

Thanks for chiming in, Richard... I still have so much to learn.


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9/14/2013 11:40:15 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Back light, late day orange tint, and lots of water reflecting and refracting.
He may have used curves to clear some washed out haze you can get from back lighting. To make it look clearer. Like how you can use them to make the bars disappear on zoo shots.
But the two kids in front are on the outside edge of the water spray. Or just closer to the camera. Fog looks thickest away from you. So there's nothing unusual about them appearing clearer.
And everything you don't see about the location is playing a part in adding fill, adding color, providing a dark background.


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9/15/2013 8:27:02 AM

 
Kathryn Wesserling
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/21/2005
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  Again, I'm learning more (that zoo bar reference intrigues me because that's become a more frequent problem.) Focal Length is what you're talking about, Gregory - the two kids opposed to the others?

The more information that you all have added have made this image even more fascinating. There is much to it that I obviously did not comprehend. Thank you.


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9/15/2013 9:04:37 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  There's isn't more to it that you wouldn't see in many other outdoor situations. You've seen hazy looking skylines before. There's just as much stuff floating in the air where you are. You're just trying to look through so much of it.


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9/15/2013 2:14:16 PM

 
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