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Photography Question 
Sharon 
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member since: 4/23/2007
 

Reflections in Car Windshield


 
 
I went to my first car show this last weekend and I have reflections in the windhields of some of my photos while not in others. Would someone please tell me how I can avoid this in the future? Also, how can I remove it from an image in Photoshop?

7/20/2010 9:24:23 PM

 
Carolyn  M. Fletcher
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PickYourShots.com

member since: 10/6/2001
  Not much you can do about it..Use a polarizer, that helps a little, but from some angles, you will get reflections...also in the chrome bumpers.

7/21/2010 4:29:51 AM

 
Alan N. Marcus

member since: 3/4/2006
  Reflections can help or hinder. Sometimes we what reflections as they can make our images more appealing. Sometimes reflections are distracting. Your first defense is your view through the camera's viewfinder. We all need to pay more attention as we compose. Sometimes all we need to do is to change our position seeking a viewpoint that minimizes reflections.

When a change of position will not help, we mount a polarizing filter. This filter is the only accessory that can mitigate reflections. A polarizing filter looks gray but it has the ability to diminish reflections from many surfaces particularly glass and water. Additionally a polarizer will darken blue sky causing the clouds to stand out in bold relief. Most will tell you that the polarizing filter is the most valuable one to have in your gadget bag.

This filter mounts in front of your camera lens. The design of the filter allows you to turn it (rotate). You rotate as you compose because its effect as to reflection removal and sky darkening changes as you make this adjustment.

Polarizing filters come in two flavors. Linear, this is a standard polarizing filter, the type used with film cameras and as lenses in 3D movies and sunglasses. A linear work just fine most times but -- some cameras, particularly digital have within their auto focusing mechanism a polarizing filter. Thus sometimes if we mount a polarizing filter it will cause a malfunction. To avoid, most digital photographers purchase a Circular Polarizing filter. This filter is actually two filters sandwiched together. The first one does the polarizing deed and the second layer shuffles the polarized light in a way that it won't adversely affect your camera's automation. Thus the circular polarizer is now the most popular flavor.

You might want to try an experiment using the 3D movie glasses or polarized sunglasses. You can hold one of these lenses in front of your camera. Looking through the viewfinder at cars and glass windows, rotate this hand-held lens to see the different effects. You can take a picture or two to see how the polarizer effect reflections. No need to tell you that sunglasses and 3D movie lenses yield substandard results compared to a quality camera filters. However, while awkward to use, this experiment will give you a peek into the world of polarization.

7/21/2010 8:34:25 AM

 
Sharon 
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member since: 4/23/2007
  Carolyn & Alan, thank you both very much for taking the time to answer my question. I will have to buy myself a filter in the near future.

7/22/2010 12:04:41 PM

 

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