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Photography Question 
Benita R. Cloward
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/23/2004
 

Correctly exposing with sunflare & sunrays


 
  love trees at sunrise
love trees at sunrise
© Benita R. Cloward
Pentax *ist DS Dig...
 
  sun-kissed sun-flower
sun-kissed sun-flower
© Benita R. Cloward
Pentax *ist DS Dig...
 
 
Hey erveryone... I'm hoping someone here might be able to help me out.

I;m a huge fan of sunflare in a picture. But I am struggling with exposing the photo correctly so thagt I not only have the sunflare but the starshaped sunrays as well.

Does it have something to do with the shutterspeed? Does it have to be less?...Let's say 1/30s or slower? Or does it rely on the f-stop? Like I said... I've tried all different version... but I just don't seem to get the perfect equation. I'd really appreciate it if any of you might have some useful answers!

The 1st attached image was exposed at f16 @ 1/180s and is one of my few "lucky" shots where I was able to catch them.

The 2nd was exposed at f4 @ 1/750s...and shows the sunflare I love... but as you can see no real sunrays. :(


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7/31/2008 5:59:59 PM

 
W.   
The sunrays in your no. 1 image are the result of the sun coming through the raggedy foliage edge of the tree against the heavily contrasting (because it's the shadow side) foliage itself.
Your no. 2 image does not have those properties, hence no sunrays. A lot of flare, though. But flare is an optical aberration. The result of directly entering light which bounces of the lens element joins and the aperture. It is a condition lens builders abhor and try to minimize.
To create flare (which I would never do) you may have some success with a low quality (=cheap) lens shooting almost straight into the sun. Leave off the lens hood.
It will still be a matter of hit and miss, though.

Have fun!


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8/2/2008 12:37:04 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Star-shaped sunrays are created with a small aperture setting (like f-22) by letting only a tiny peek of sunlight appear from behind a solid object.
That object will of course silhouette and a natural starburst will encircle the point of bright light.
The objective is to get the starbust effect without the line of lens flare circles extending into the frame.
(a href=http://www.cammphoto.com/-/cammphoto/detail.asp?photoID=1695051&cat=25750>See example)

As "W" described, "lens flare" is perceived as an un-desirable anomaly that's usually best avoided.
(But there have been a few artistically contrived lens flare photos that look pretty cool.)

If you want to deliberately create them, just keep the sun anywhere within the frame except for dead-center.


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8/2/2008 3:49:16 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Sorry my Link didn't work last time.


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8/2/2008 3:57:48 PM

 
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