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Photography Question 
Sherrie K. Miller
 

push an pull


how do I push an pull film an what are the reasons for doing it? if you need more info I am shooting ith a 500mm lense outside mostly on sunnydays with wild life! I also would like to know what is the best film for this so I can get a good 8 x 10 without the grain look
thank you
SM


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4/4/2002 11:34:21 AM

 
Jeff S. Kennedy   Pushing a film is rating it at a faster ISO and having it developed for that new rating. One of the inherent problems when pushing film is that you end up with more grain. You are better off using a faster film if you anticipate needing that extra speed. If grain is an issue for you then I would suggest using a slide film like Provia 100F or 400F. Provia is an extremely fine grained film and pushes quite nicely. The disadvantage is that it is a slide film and prints may be more expensive to make. But with todays technology of scanning and outputing directly from the digital file it is a lot easier.


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4/4/2002 12:11:19 PM

 
Sherrie K. Miller  
 
 
wounderfull that answered my Q. now what can I do about light ... when taking pic. at church for easter an holy thursday I found the pic came out very granie, an dull little light an on some there were shadows as if a ghost were stnading in fromt of my flash! I do not know what happened can you tell me? ill put a pic on here for you to see!
thanks
SM


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4/4/2002 2:25:11 PM

 
Sherrie K. Miller  
 
  communion
communion
half of the pic is all dark
© Sherrie K. Miller
 
  Holy Thursday
Holy Thursday
grain loook
© Sherrie K. Miller
 
  washing of the feet
washing of the feet
half of pic is dark...
© Sherrie K. Miller
 
 
wounderfull that answered my Q. now what can I do about light ... when taking pic. at church for easter an holy thursday I found the pic came out very granie, an dull little light an on some there were shadows as if a ghost were stnading in fromt of my flash! I do not know what happened can you tell me? ill put a pic on here for you to see!
thanks
SM


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4/4/2002 2:26:42 PM

 
John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/27/2001
  Sherrie,

The grainy appearance occurs with underexposure of color negatives.

First, look at the negatives. Do they also show these problems? This will eliminate whether or not the printer did this when making the prints.

Second, it looks as if there was very bright, direct sunlight illuminating the subjects with people or other objects shadowing them. If so, a flash will not entirely "fill" the shadows. Direct sun is too bright and the shadows too deep. Your flash adds light everywhere, sunlit area and shadow alike. All it can do is slightly reduce the difference between the two.

Third, does your camera have a case or strap on it? Recreate how you were using it for these. Does the case nose or strap get anywhere near the front of the flash or the lens? I do keep cameras cased for storage, and do have straps on them. However, when using them I take the case nose off completely, and if I'm not keeping the strap around my neck (I usually do not when working events like these) I remove the strap. All my straps have "quick releases" near the camera body to allow easy removal. Both Tamrac [N45] and Domke [Gripper 7416] make excellent straps with secure QR's. I'm not that keen on the neoprene "shock absorber" straps. The Tamrac N45 and its neck padding is the *best* strap I've ever used.

-- John


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4/6/2002 6:11:45 PM

 
Victoria    Hi Sherrie,
I want to add to John's answers. I believe that the shutter was out of sync in these photos. Ive had this happen to me many times on accident because I just forgot to change the shutter speed when switching back and forth between flash and no flash. Usually the fastest shutter that can be used on many cameras when using flash is 90 and below. there are however some that will allow a faster shutter. (check your camera manual) So if u were using flash at a faster shutter than your camera allows, this will happen.


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4/7/2002 3:59:39 AM

 
John A. Lind
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/27/2001
  Victoria,
An out-of-sync shutter/flash timing is always a possibility with photographs properly exposed in one portion and badly underexposed in another. I did that *once* about 20 years ago.

With a focal plane shutter, the symptom for a shutter speed faster than the X-Sync speed (or shutters out of sync) is almost always a straight line dividing the underexposed portion from the properly exposed one. The effect has a unique, almost unmistakable appearance in the photographs because the shutter curtains are just in front of the film plane. For horizontal traveling shutter curtains, the photograph is divided vertically. For vertical traveling shutter curtains the photograph is divided horizontally.

The "flash sync" brought one other thought to mind though. I have seen similar photographs occur when more than one person fires a flash simultaneously. The shadows created by the other flash unit can produce similar symptoms. To occur in several photographs, all at the same event, would be exceedingly rare! The timing of the two photographers would have to be exactly the same.

-- John


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4/7/2002 9:44:39 AM

 
Jeff S. Kennedy   It definitely doesn't look like a sync problem because of the irregularity of the shadows. It looks like your flash was obscured by somthing.


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4/7/2002 12:47:24 PM

 
Victoria    The first one looked to me as flash sync problem. However the other 2 I think could be what John said "I have seen similar photographs occur when more than one person fires a flash simultaneously" I too have had this happen to me.
Sherrie, you asked If these could possibly be "spirit" photos. A hobby of mine being a paranormal investigator, I have taken and studied "spirit/ghost" photos. Dark shadows are usually known as "dark entites", however thats not always the case and since these were taken in a church, Im pretty sure thats not the case here. Since detail is lost when enlarging these photos due to the resolution and that I cant study the negs, I can not see enough details to be sure. If no one else was taking photos the same time you were and If you are really curious as to if these are "spirit" photos, a good site to post them for feedback is www.ghostweb.com.




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4/7/2002 2:36:53 PM

 
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