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Photography Question 
Alex T. Mizuno
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/28/2007
 

How to Shoot Wide Angle with Hot Spots


I've been shooting interiors of churches with a 18-135mm zoom lens. First I zoom into stained glasses to meter (they are usually much brighter than the entire church interior), then I zoom out for the final composition to read the exposure for the entire scene. I shoot two different exposures for the stained glasses and the entire interior and use HDR in PS.

Now, my question is, if I use a wide angle prime lens or a wide angle zoom lens, how do I read stained glasses? Should I use a spot meter or a gray card? Is there any way to balance the lighting with a wide angle lens? I appreciate any tip!


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7/3/2008 12:08:41 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Add light with flash or shoot for the windows and shoot for the room and combine the images.


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7/3/2008 12:49:17 PM

 
Alex T. Mizuno
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/28/2007
  Thank you for the tips, Gregory! I'd rather not use flash because many churches don't welcome use of the flash. Also, it's a bit difficult to read only the windows when you use a prime lens.


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7/3/2008 1:02:33 PM

 
Bob Fately   Alex, the exposure for the stained glass window will not change just because you change your lens/angle of view. So spot metering the window, or even using the telephoto or zoom lens to meter the window itself as you do now. CHange to the W/A lens and use that exposure setting, then take another and combine as you already do.

A grey card won't help for exposure purposes like this - cards are used for reflected light readings and the exposure setting you get will be appropriate as an average reading - it won't be able to hone in on the proper exposure of the window.


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7/3/2008 2:47:04 PM

 
Alex T. Mizuno
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/28/2007
  Thank you Bob! I'd like to make sure if I'm getting your suggestion correctly. I can use the spot metering on the stained glasses even with a prime (wide angle) lens without going close to the glasses (in many cases, going close to the glasses is physically impossible)?


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7/3/2008 3:05:52 PM

 
W.   
Correct, Alex.

Have fun!


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7/3/2008 3:19:52 PM

 
Alex T. Mizuno
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/28/2007
  Thank you W.S. for clarifying!!


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7/3/2008 3:36:13 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
 


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7/3/2008 8:01:17 PM

 
Alex T. Mizuno
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/28/2007
  Yes, your Highness. Jolly good, jolly good.


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7/3/2008 8:09:26 PM

 
W.   
Your "Highness"?
That is an insult! ERII, a.k.a. QEII, is not a lower ranking princess, but a reigning monarch. Commonly, but WRONGLY, known as "the Queen". The correct address form is "Your Majesty".

Why is "the Queen" wrong? Because a Queen is the female spouse/consort/wedding partner of a King, a reigning monarch, but is NOT a reigning monarch herself.
ERII/QEII is a reigning monarch.


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7/4/2008 12:16:44 AM

 
W.   
ERII/QEII is a reigning monarch. Thus she is formally a King, not a Queen, in the eyes of the law/constitution.


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7/4/2008 12:19:31 AM

 
Alex T. Mizuno
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/28/2007
  Thank you for enlightening me, W.S. ! That's what I like about BP. I learn something everyday :)


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7/4/2008 12:57:16 AM

 
Alan N. Marcus   Hi Alex,

Many family events take place at a church, mosque, synagogue, etc. Likely, flash is inappropriate. Often you can take pictures using existing light if you find a secluded vantage point like a balcony etc.

Likely your shots include the stained-glass windows. Generally, they will be quite bright and thus they end up “blown-out” when your exposure is adjusted for the interior. Not much you can do as a countermeasure. A seasoned professional on assignment might consider bringing in elaborate supplemental lighting.

If you must get both interior and stained-glass, sometime luck is on your side. This is mainly a matter of timing. What you want is late afternoon or early morning or heavy cloud cover. The idea is to pick a time-of-day when the windows are not receiving direct sunlight. If you are lucky, the windows will record along with the interior.

As to exposure: Zoom in close to the stained-glass, fill the entire frame. This permits your camera’s metering system to get a handle on stained-glass exposure. Note the exposure as indicated, or partially depress the shutter release to lock-in the settings. Then back-off to recompose, complete the exposure stroke, or re-set the camera to the previously metered settings.

As a rule-of-thumb, stained-glass illuminated by bright sun usually records well if the camera is set 3 f/stops larger in aperture than the setting used for the outdoor lighting conditions. Example: Camera set to 100 ISO, outdoor exposure 1/125 sec. @ f/16. Try inside using 1/125 sec. @ f/5.6. (Rule-of thumb not guaranteed).

Alan Marcus (truly marginal technical gobbledygook)
ammarcus@earthlink.net


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7/4/2008 8:37:37 AM

 
Alex T. Mizuno
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/28/2007
  Hi Alan,

Thank you very much for the great tips! It sounds like a simple thing but I did not think of choosing time of the day to shoot. As a matter fact, one priest suggested me to come early in the morning to shoot so that I can get a good lighting on the stained glasses.

Opening up 3 stops from the outdoor exposure is a great tip too. I experiment this next I have a church shoot.

Again, thank you for your kind tips, Alan! I really appreciate them.

Alex


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7/7/2008 2:04:18 AM

 
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